Deep Thought: Should “we” get involved in politics?

After listening to this podcast S2E4 – Jesus Jukes , from youtube.com
“Published on Jan 11, 2017

You seem interested in what people want, but what about what God wants? You just got Jesus Juked! Bobby and John explore what, why, and how not to apply Jesus Jukes into your conversations. We chit-chat about a heartwarming story from Red Lake Falls and a touch a little more into Christians and politics. Our segment today: Would you rather – Jesus edition.

This was supposed to be episode 5, but recording for episode 4 didn’t happen, so 5 now became 4. Which means, we skipped a step in John’s Coffee Corner, but trust me, it’s still good.

…my friends co-host together, it made me “search” on this topic..

Wayne Grudem – Does ‘political’ involvement distract from the gospel? – Part 1


“Published on Mar 7, 2014

Website http://www.christian.org.uk
Facebook http://www.facebook.com/christianinst…
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Our usual weekly news video is taking a short break, and will be back soon.
So over the next few weeks, we’re going to bring you a serialised talk by Wayne Grudem entitled; Does ‘political’ involvement distract from the gospel?
Wayne says there are 5 wrong views of Christian influence on politics, and one right view.
This week he explores his first ‘wrong’ view; – Government should compel religion.”

*should we do “evangelism” or “politics”?

I’m still adding to this , so feel free to come back. Thanks for checking this blog out! 🙂

Thoughts, suggestions, feedback, etc..?

Good News Sociology
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Spotlight: Who was Martin Luther King Jr.?

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. drmartinlutherkingjr.com
The Greatest Orator For Peace And Love
“..The ultimate weakness of violence
is that it is a descending spiral,
begetting the very thing it seeks to destroy.
Instead of diminishing evil, it multiplies it.
Through violence you may murder the liar,
but you cannot murder the lie, nor establish the truth.
Through violence you murder the hater,
but you do not murder hate.
In fact, violence merely increases hate….
Returning violence for violence multiples violence,
adding deeper darkness to a night already devoid of stars.
Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that.
Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that.
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr…”

Martin Luther King, Jr. – Mini Bio


“Uploaded on Jan 8, 2010

A short biography of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. He is widely considered the most influential leader of the American civil rights movement. He fought to overturn Jim Crow segregation laws and eliminate social and economic differences between blacks and whites. King’s speeches and famous quotes continue to inspire millions today.

20 Interesting Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Facts todayifoundout.com
“1) His name was originally Michael, not Martin. His father was also Michael King, hence why Martin Luther King Jr. was originally named Michael King Jr. However, after a trip to Germany in 1931, Michael King Sr. changed his own name in homage to historic German theologian Martin Luther. Michael King Jr. was two years old at the time and King Sr. made the decision to change his son’s name to Martin Luther as well….

3) King wasn’t the only one to die at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis on April 4, 1968. After he was killed, one of the hotel workers, Lorraine Bailey (who was also the wife of the motel owner and who it was named after), upon seeing King get shot, had a heart attack and later died from this.

4) Also on the day King was killed, he was out on the balcony for a smoke. While you’ll be hard pressed to find a picture of him smoking, he smoked regularly, though had a habit of hiding this partially due to the stigma, particularly within the church at the time, but also because he didn’t want his kids to take up smoking, and so didn’t like pictures of himself doing it, nor did he like to smoke when they were around. …

7) He almost didn’t become a minister. After graduating from college, he still had serious doubts about Christianity and the Bible and told his father (who was a Baptist minister, as his grandfather had also been) that he didn’t want to be a minister and instead was considering becoming a doctor or a lawyer. He later decided that the Bible had “many profound truths which one cannot escape” and chose to become a minister, entering seminary at Crozer Theological Seminary in Pennsylvania. …

10) King convinced “Uhura” on Star Trek, Nichelle Nichols (who incidentally later went on to work for NASA), to continue on with the role after the first season. Nichols stated he told her not to leave the show because she was not only playing a black person as a main character on TV, but she was also playing a character that didn’t conform to the stereotypical black person of the day, usually portrayed. Rather, Uhura was portrayed as an intelligent member of the crew and an equal to those around her….”

*see Nichelle Nichols imdb.com
“..was born Grace Nichols on December 28, 1932 in Robbins, Illinois. She began her show business career at age 16 as a singer with Duke Ellington in a ballet she created for one of his compositions and later sang with his band. After switching to acting, she was twice nominated for the Sarah Siddons Award for best actress in “The …..”

SPEECHES

The Archive | The Martin Luther King Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social … thekingcenter.org

“..There are nearly a million documents associated with the life of Martin Luther King Jr. These pages will present a more dynamic view than is often seen of Dr. King’s life and times. The documents reveal the scholar, the father, and the pastor. Through these papers we see the United States of America at one of its most vulnerable, most honest and perhaps most human moments in history. There are letters bearing the official marks of royalty and the equally regal compositions of children. You will see speeches, telegrams, scribbled notes, patient admonitions and urgent pleas. This spotlight shows you a glimpse of the remarkable history within this collection…”
The Speeches of Martin Luther King Jr. npr.org
Remembering Key Addresses, Sermons by the Civil Rights Leader
Martin Luther King, Jr. | National Archives archives.gov

“..Martin Luther King, Jr.

On August 28, 1963, Martin Luther King Jr., delivered a speech to a massive group of civil rights marchers gathered around the Lincoln memorial in Washington DC. The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom brought together the nations most prominent civil rights leaders, along with tens of thousands of marchers, to press the United States government for equality. The culmination of this event was the influential and most memorable speech of Dr. King’s career. Popularly known as the “I have a Dream” speech, the words of Martin Luther King, Jr. influenced the Federal government to take more direct actions to more fully realize racial equality.

Mister Maestro, Inc., and Twentieth Century Fox Records Company recorded the speech and offered the recording for sale. Dr. King and his attorneys claimed that the speech was copyrighted and the recording violated that copyright. The court found in favor of Dr. King. Among the papers filed in the case and available at the National Archives at New York City is a deposition given by Martin Luther King, Jr. and signed in his own hand…”

Martin Luther King – I Have A Dream Speech – August 28, 1963 (Full Speech)


“Published on Jan 21, 2013

Subscribe
-~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
I Have a Dream Speech
Martin Luther King’s Address at March on Washington
August 28, 1963. Washington, D.C.
..”

Related:

My Country ‘Tis of Thee (arr. D. Willcocks) — Washington National Cathedral Choir , from youtube.com

Martin Luther King Speaks! “I’ve Been to the Mountaintop” (Full) , from youtube.com
“Published on Jun 10, 2015

Martin Luther King Speaks! “I’ve Been to the Mountaintop” (Full)
3 April 1968 Memphis, Tennessee. Would would become King’s final speech, he talks in support of striking Memphis sanitation workers.

Martin Luther King’s Final Speech: ‘I’ve Been to the Mountaintop’ — The Full Text By THE REV MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. MEMPHIS, Tenn., April 3, 1968 abcnews.go.com

Thank you very kindly, my friends. As I listened to Ralph Abernathy and his eloquent and generous introduction and then thought about myself, I wondered who he was talking about. It’s always good to have your closest friend and associate to say something good about you. And Ralph Abernathy is the best friend that I have in the world. I’m delighted to see each of you here tonight in spite of a storm warning. You reveal that you are determined to go on anyhow.

Something is happening in Memphis; something is happening in our world. And you know, if I were standing at the beginning of time, with the possibility of taking a kind of general and panoramic view of the whole of human history up to now, and the Almighty said to me, “Martin Luther King, which age would you like to live in?” I would take my mental flight by Egypt and I would watch God’s children in their magnificent trek from the dark dungeons of Egypt through, or rather across the Red Sea, through the wilderness on toward the promised land. And in spite of its magnificence, I wouldn’t stop there.

I would move on by Greece and take my mind to Mount Olympus. And I would see Plato, Aristotle, Socrates, Euripides and Aristophanes assembled around the Parthenon. And I would watch them around the Parthenon as they discussed the great and eternal issues of reality. But I wouldn’t stop there.

I would go on, even to the great heyday of the Roman Empire. And I would see developments around there, through various emperors and leaders. But I wouldn’t stop there.

I would even come up to the day of the Renaissance, and get a quick picture of all that the Renaissance did for the cultural and aesthetic life of man. But I wouldn’t stop there.

I would even go by the way that the man for whom I am named had his habitat. And I would watch Martin Luther as he tacked his ninety-five theses on the door at the church of Wittenberg. But I wouldn’t stop there. I would come on up even to 1863, and watch a vacillating President by the name of Abraham Lincoln finally come to the conclusion that he had to sign the Emancipation Proclamation. But I wouldn’t stop there.

I would even come up to the early thirties, and see a man grappling with the problems of the bankruptcy of his nation. And come with an eloquent cry that we have nothing to fear but “fear itself.” But I wouldn’t stop there. Strangely enough, I would turn to the Almighty, and say, “If you allow me to live just a few years in the second half of the 20th century, I will be happy.”

Now that’s a strange statement to make, because the world is all messed up. The nation is sick. Trouble is in the land; confusion all around. That’s a strange statement. But I know, somehow, that only when it is dark enough can you see the stars. And I see God working in this period of the twentieth century in a way that men, in some strange way, are responding. Something is happening in our world. The masses of people are rising up. And wherever they are assembled today, whether they are in Johannesburg, South Africa; Nairobi, Kenya; Accra, Ghana; New York City; Atlanta, Georgia; Jackson, Mississippi; or Memphis, Tennessee — the cry is always the same: “We want to be free.”

And another reason that I’m happy to live in this period is that we have been forced to a point where we are going to have to grapple with the problems that men have been trying to grapple with through history, but the demands didn’t force them to do it. Survival demands that we grapple with them. Men, for years now, have been talking about war and peace. But now, no longer can they just talk about it. It is no longer a choice between violence and nonviolence in this world; it’s nonviolence or nonexistence. That is where we are today.

And also in the human rights revolution, if something isn’t done, and done in a hurry, to bring the colored peoples of the world out of their long years of poverty, their long years of hurt and neglect, the whole world is doomed. Now, I’m just happy that God has allowed me to live in this period to see what is unfolding. And I’m happy that He’s allowed me to be in Memphis.

I can remember — I can remember when Negroes were just going around as Ralph has said, so often, scratching where they didn’t itch, and laughing when they were not tickled. But that day is all over. We mean business now, and we are determined to gain our rightful place in God’s world.

And that’s all this whole thing is about. We aren’t engaged in any negative protest and in any negative arguments with anybody. We are saying that we are determined to be men. We are determined to be people. We are saying — We are saying that we are God’s children. And that we are God’s children, we don’t have to live like we are forced to live.

Now, what does all of this mean in this great period of history? It means that we’ve got to stay together. We’ve got to stay together and maintain unity. You know, whenever Pharaoh wanted to prolong the period of slavery in Egypt, he had a favorite, favorite formula for doing it. What was that? He kept the slaves fighting among themselves. But whenever the slaves get together, something happens in Pharaoh’s court, and he cannot hold the slaves in slavery. When the slaves get together, that’s the beginning of getting out of slavery. Now let us maintain unity.

Secondly, let us keep the issues where they are. The issue is injustice. The issue is the refusal of Memphis to be fair and honest in its dealings with its public servants, who happen to be sanitation workers. Now, we’ve got to keep attention on that. That’s always the problem with a little violence. You know what happened the other day, and the press dealt only with the window-breaking. I read the articles. They very seldom got around to mentioning the fact that one thousand, three hundred sanitation workers are on strike, and that Memphis is not being fair to them, and that Mayor Loeb is in dire need of a doctor. They didn’t get around to that.

Now we’re going to march again, and we’ve got to march again, in order to put the issue where it is supposed to be — and force everybody to see that there are thirteen hundred of God’s children here suffering, sometimes going hungry, going through dark and dreary nights wondering how this thing is going to come out. That’s the issue. And we’ve got to say to the nation: We know how it’s coming out. For when people get caught up with that which is right and they are willing to sacrifice for it, there is no stopping point short of victory. We aren’t going to let any mace stop us. We are masters in our nonviolent movement in disarming police forces; they don’t know what to do. I’ve seen them so often. I remember in Birmingham, Alabama, when we were in that majestic struggle there, we would move out of the 16th Street Baptist Church day after day; by the hundreds we would move out. And Bull Connor would tell them to send the dogs forth, and they did come; but we just went before the dogs singing, “Ain’t gonna let nobody turn me around.”

Bull Connor next would say, “Turn the fire hoses on.” And as I said to you the other night, Bull Connor didn’t know history. He knew a kind of physics that somehow didn’t relate to the transphysics that we knew about. And that was the fact that there was a certain kind of fire that no water could put out. And we went before the fire hoses; we had known water. If we were Baptist or some other denominations, we had been immersed. If we were Methodist, and some others, we had been sprinkled, but we knew water. That couldn’t stop us.

And we just went on before the dogs and we would look at them; and we’d go on before the water hoses and we would look at it, and we’d just go on singing “Over my head I see freedom in the air.” And then we would be thrown in the paddy wagons, and sometimes we were stacked in there like sardines in a can. And they would throw us in, and old Bull would say, “Take ’em off,” and they did; and we would just go in the paddy wagon singing, “We Shall Overcome.”

And every now and then we’d get in jail, and we’d see the jailers looking through the windows being moved by our prayers, and being moved by our words and our songs. And there was a power there which Bull Connor couldn’t adjust to; and so we ended up transforming Bull into a steer, and we won our struggle in Birmingham. Now we’ve got to go on in Memphis just like that. I call upon you to be with us when we go out Monday.

Now about injunctions: We have an injunction and we’re going into court tomorrow morning to fight this illegal, unconstitutional injunction. All we say to America is, “Be true to what you said on paper.” If I lived in China or even Russia, or any totalitarian country, maybe I could understand some of these illegal injunctions. Maybe I could understand the denial of certain basic First Amendment privileges, because they hadn’t committed themselves to that over there.

But somewhere I read of the freedom of assembly. Somewhere I read of the freedom of speech.

Somewhere I read of the freedom of press. Somewhere I read that the greatness of America is the right to protest for right. And so just as I say, we aren’t going to let dogs or water hoses turn us around, we aren’t going to let any injunction turn us around. We are going on.

We need all of you. And you know what’s beautiful to me is to see all of these ministers of the Gospel. It’s a marvelous picture. Who is it that is supposed to articulate the longings and aspirations of the people more than the preacher? Somehow the preacher must have a kind of fire shut up in his bones. And whenever injustice is around he tell it. Somehow the preacher must be an Amos, and saith, “When God speaks who can but prophesy?” Again with Amos, “Let justice roll down like waters and righteousness like a mighty stream.” Somehow the preacher must say with Jesus, “The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, because he hath anointed me,” and he’s anointed me to deal with the problems of the poor.”

And I want to commend the preachers, under the leadership of these noble men: James Lawson, one who has been in this struggle for many years; he’s been to jail for struggling; he’s been kicked out of Vanderbilt University for this struggle, but he’s still going on, fighting for the rights of his people. Reverend Ralph Jackson, Billy Kiles; I could just go right on down the list, but time will not permit.

But I want to thank all of them. And I want you to thank them, because so often, preachers aren’t concerned about anything but themselves. And I’m always happy to see a relevant ministry.

It’s all right to talk about “long white robes over yonder,” in all of its symbolism. But ultimately people want some suits and dresses and shoes to wear down here! It’s all right to talk about “streets flowing with milk and honey,” but God has commanded us to be concerned about the slums down here, and his children who can’t eat three square meals a day. It’s all right to talk about the new Jerusalem, but one day, God’s preacher must talk about the new New York, the new Atlanta, the new Philadelphia, the new Los Angeles, the new Memphis, Tennessee. This is what we have to do.

Now the other thing we’ll have to do is this: Always anchor our external direct action with the power of economic withdrawal. Now, we are poor people. Individually, we are poor when you compare us with white society in America. We are poor. Never stop and forget that collectively — that means all of us together — collectively we are richer than all the nations in the world, with the exception of nine. Did you ever think about that?

After you leave the United States, Soviet Russia, Great Britain, West Germany, France, and I could name the others, the American Negro collectively is richer than most nations of the world. We have an annual income of more than thirty billion dollars a year, which is more than all of the exports of the United States, and more than the national budget of Canada. Did you know that? That’s power right there, if we know how to pool it.

We don’t have to argue with anybody. We don’t have to curse and go around acting bad with our words. We don’t need any bricks and bottles. We don’t need any Molotov cocktails. We just need to go around to these stores, and to these massive industries in our country, and say, “God sent us by here, to say to you that you’re not treating his children right. And we’ve come by here to ask you to make the first item on your agenda fair treatment, where God’s children are concerned.

Now, if you are not prepared to do that, we do have an agenda that we must follow. And our agenda calls for withdrawing economic support from you.”

And so, as a result of this, we are asking you tonight, to go out and tell your neighbors not to buy Coca-Cola in Memphis. Go by and tell them not to buy Sealtest milk. Tell them not to buy — what is the other bread? — Wonder Bread. And what is the other bread company, Jesse? Tell them not to buy Hart’s bread. As Jesse Jackson has said, up to now, only the garbage men have been feeling pain; now we must kind of redistribute the pain.

We are choosing these companies because they haven’t been fair in their hiring policies; and we are choosing them because they can begin the process of saying they are going to support the needs and the rights of these men who are on strike. And then they can move on town — downtown and tell Mayor Loeb to do what is right.

But not only that, we’ve got to strengthen black institutions. I call upon you to take your money out of the banks downtown and deposit your money in Tri-State Bank. We want a “bank-in” movement in Memphis. Go by the savings and loan association. I’m not asking you something that we don’t do ourselves at SCLC. Judge Hooks and others will tell you that we have an account here in the savings and loan association from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

We are telling you to follow what we are doing. Put your money there. You have six or seven black insurance companies here in the city of Memphis. Take out your insurance there. We want to have an “insurance-in.”

Now these are some practical things that we can do. We begin the process of building a greater economic base. And at the same time, we are putting pressure where it really hurts. I ask you to follow through here.

Now, let me say as I move to my conclusion that we’ve got to give ourselves to this struggle until the end.

Nothing would be more tragic than to stop at this point in Memphis. We’ve got to see it through. And when we have our march, you need to be there. If it means leaving work, if it means leaving school — be there. Be concerned about your brother. You may not be on strike. But either we go up together, or we go down together.

Let us develop a kind of dangerous unselfishness. One day a man came to Jesus, and he wanted to raise some questions about some vital matters of life. At points he wanted to trick Jesus, and show him that he knew a little more than Jesus knew and throw him off base…. Now that question could have easily ended up in a philosophical and theological debate. But Jesus immediately pulled that question from mid-air, and placed it on a dangerous curve between Jerusalem and Jericho. And he talked about a certain man, who fell among thieves. You remember that a Levite and a priest passed by on the other side.

They didn’t stop to help him. And finally a man of another race came by. He got down from his beast, decided not to be compassionate by proxy. But he got down with him, administered first aid, and helped the man in need. Jesus ended up saying, this was the good man, this was the great man, because he had the capacity to project the “I” into the “thou,” and to be concerned about his brother.

Now you know, we use our imagination a great deal to try to determine why the priest and the Levite didn’t stop. At times we say they were busy going to a church meeting, an ecclesiastical gathering, and they had to get on down to Jerusalem so they wouldn’t be late for their meeting. At other times we would speculate that there was a religious law that “One who was engaged in religious ceremonials was not to touch a human body twenty-four hours before the ceremony.” And every now and then we begin to wonder whether maybe they were not going down to Jerusalem — or down to Jericho, rather to organize a “Jericho Road Improvement Association.”

That’s a possibility. Maybe they felt that it was better to deal with the problem from the causal root, rather than to get bogged down with an individual effect.

But I’m going to tell you what my imagination tells me. It’s possible that those men were afraid. You see, the Jericho road is a dangerous road. I remember when Mrs. King and I were first in Jerusalem. We rented a car and drove from Jerusalem down to Jericho. And as soon as we got on that road, I said to my wife, “I can see why Jesus used this as the setting for his parable.” It’s a winding, meandering road. It’s really conducive for ambushing. You start out in Jerusalem, which is about 1200 miles — or rather 1200 feet above sea level. And by the time you get down to Jericho, fifteen or twenty minutes later, you’re about 2200 feet below sea level. That’s a dangerous road. In the days of Jesus it came to be known as the “Bloody Pass.”

And you know, it’s possible that the priest and the Levite looked over that man on the ground and wondered if the robbers were still around. Or it’s possible that they felt that the man on the ground was merely faking. And he was acting like he had been robbed and hurt, in order to seize them over there, lure them there for quick and easy seizure. And so the first question that the priest asked — the first question that the Levite asked was, “If I stop to help this man, what will happen to me?” But then the Good Samaritan came by. And he reversed the question: “If I do not stop to help this man, what will happen to him?”

*see Luke 10

That’s the question before you tonight. Not, “If I stop to help the sanitation workers, what will happen to my job. Not, “If I stop to help the sanitation workers what will happen to all of the hours that I usually spend in my office every day and every week as a pastor?” The question is not, “If I stop to help this man in need, what will happen to me?” The question is, “If I do not stop to help the sanitation workers, what will happen to them?” That’s the question.

Let us rise up tonight with a greater readiness. Let us stand with a greater determination. And let us move on in these powerful days, these days of challenge to make America what it ought to be. We have an opportunity to make America a better nation. And I want to thank God, once more, for allowing me to be here with you. You know, several years ago, I was in New York City autographing the first book that I had written. And while sitting there autographing books, a demented black woman came up.

The only question I heard from her was, “Are you Martin Luther King?” And I was looking down writing, and I said, “Yes.” And the next minute I felt something beating on my chest. Before I knew it I had been stabbed by this demented woman. I was rushed to Harlem Hospital. It was a dark Saturday afternoon. And that blade had gone through, and the X-rays revealed that the tip of the blade was on the edge of my aorta, the main artery. And once that’s punctured, your drowned in your own blood — that’s the end of you.

It came out in the New York Times the next morning, that if I had merely sneezed, I would have died. Well, about four days later, they allowed me, after the operation, after my chest had been opened, and the blade had been taken out, to move around in the wheel chair in the hospital.

They allowed me to read some of the mail that came in, and from all over the states and the world, kind letters came in. I read a few, but one of them I will never forget. I had received one from the President and the Vice-President. I’ve forgotten what those telegrams said. I’d received a visit and a letter from the Governor of New York, but I’ve forgotten what that letter said. But there was another letter that came from a little girl, a young girl who was a student at the White Plains High School. And I looked at that letter, and I’ll never forget it. It said simply,

“Dear Dr. King, I am a ninth-grade student at the White Plains High School.”

And she said,

“While it should not matter, I would like to mention that I’m a white girl. I read in the paper of your misfortune, and of your suffering. And I read that if you had sneezed, you would have died. And I’m simply writing you to say that I’m so happy that you didn’t sneeze.”

And I want to say tonight — I want to say tonight that I too am happy that I didn’t sneeze. Because if I had sneezed, I wouldn’t have been around here in 1960, when students all over the South started sitting-in at lunch counters. And I knew that as they were sitting in, they were really standing up for the best in the American dream, and taking the whole nation back to those great wells of democracy which were dug deep by the Founding Fathers in the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution.

If I had sneezed, I wouldn’t have been around here in 1961, when we decided to take a ride for freedom and ended segregation in inter-state travel.

If I had sneezed, I wouldn’t have been around here in 1962, when Negroes in Albany, Georgia, decided to straighten their backs up. And whenever men and women straighten their backs up, they are going somewhere, because a man can’t ride your back unless it is bent.

If I had sneezed — If I had sneezed I wouldn’t have been here in 1963, when the black people of Birmingham, Alabama, aroused the conscience of this nation, and brought into being the Civil Rights Bill.

If I had sneezed, I wouldn’t have had a chance later that year, in August, to try to tell America about a dream that I had had.

If I had sneezed, I wouldn’t have been down in Selma, Alabama, to see the great Movement there.

If I had sneezed, I wouldn’t have been in Memphis to see a community rally around those brothers and sisters who are suffering.

I’m so happy that I didn’t sneeze.

And they were telling me –. Now, it doesn’t matter, now. It really doesn’t matter what happens now. I left Atlanta this morning, and as we got started on the plane, there were six of us.

The pilot said over the public address system, “We are sorry for the delay, but we have Dr. Martin Luther King on the plane. And to be sure that all of the bags were checked, and to be sure that nothing would be wrong with on the plane, we had to check out everything carefully. And we’ve had the plane protected and guarded all night.”

And then I got into Memphis. And some began to say the threats, or talk about the threats that were out. What would happen to me from some of our sick white brothers?

Well, I don’t know what will happen now. We’ve got some difficult days ahead. But it really doesn’t matter with me now, because I’ve been to the mountaintop. And I don’t mind.

Like anybody, I would like to live a long life. Longevity has its place. But I’m not concerned about that now. I just want to do God’s will. And He’s allowed me to go up to the mountain. And I’ve looked over. And I’ve seen the Promised Land. I may not get there with you. But I want you to know tonight, that we, as a people, will get to the promised land!

And so I’m happy, tonight.

I’m not worried about anything.

I’m not fearing any man.

Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord.

Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Nobel Peace Prize Lecture from Oslo, 11 Dec. 1964 (full audio)

Tribute

-Music

“We Shall Overcome” (“trying” to ) Play by Piano (October 28th 2010) , from youtube.com

Learned anything new? What else do you know that wasn’t mentioned about MLK Jr.? What are some ways “we” can keep his dream alive?

Good News Sociology
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Deep Thought: What “good” has come out of this #StandingRock ?

Awareness of Native Tribes

Since this movement, the nation and worlds’ interest has grown on understanding of knowing more of the indigenous people..

Standing rock news | standing rock protest | 7 history lessons of the Dakota Access Pipeline


“Published on Nov 18, 2016

standing rock news | standing rock protest | 7 history lessons that help explain the Dakota Access Pipeline protests
The safety of the water supply is the immediate issue at Standing Rock, but the discussions at camp go well beyond Dakota Access. There’s talk of treaties, discovery doctrines, environmental racism and centuries of unkept promises undergirding the pipeline fight.
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From 280 Tribes, a Protest on the Plains By JACK HEALY SEPT. 11, 2016 Related Article nytimes.com
“NEAR CANNON BALL, N.D. — When visitors turn off a narrow North Dakota highway and drive into the Sacred Stone Camp, where thousands have come to protest an oil pipeline, they thread through an arcade of flags whipping in the wind. Each represents one of the 280 Native American tribes that have flocked here in what activists are calling the largest, most diverse tribal action in at least a century, perhaps since Little Bighorn.

They have come from across the Plains and the Mountain West, from places like California, Florida, Peru and New Zealand. They are Oglala Lakota, Navajo, Seneca, Onondaga and Anishinaabe. Their names include Keeyana Yellowman, Peter Owl Boy, Santana Running Bear and Darrell Holy Eagle.

Some came alone, driving 24 hours straight across the Plains when they saw news on social media about the swelling protest. Some came in caravans with dozens of friends and relatives. One man walked from Bismarck. ..”

“Celebrities” and Known Leaders “Standing-up”

Passionate Mark Ruffalo Amazing Uncut Speech At Standing Rock #wniwiconi #Share! 11/18/16 , from youtube.com

Susan Sarandon irate over North Dakota pipeline from youtube.com

Legislation Pressure on the Oil Pipeline Industry

Feds Order Correction to Plan to North Dakota Pipeline Owner By The Associated Press BILLINGS, Mont. — Dec 21, 2016, 2:59 PM ET abcnews.go.com
“… Federal regulators have outlined corrective steps that must take place before a company may restart a pipeline that leaked 176,000 gallons of oil into and along a creek in western North Dakota.

The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration issued the order Tuesday to Belle Fourche (foosh) Pipeline Co.

Company spokeswoman Wendy Owen says the order is under review.

A landowner spotted the spill Dec. 5, after the company’s monitoring equipment failed to detect the rupture.

The company says erosion of a hillside might have ruptured the pipe, but the cause is still being investigated. A precise location of the break is unknown.

The federal agency’s order requires the company to excavate the pipeline in the area of the break, including where it’s placed 45 feet below the creek bed…”
*see North Dakota: Oil Impact on Communities Archives

“… President Barack Obama’s administration is expected to push through long-delayed safety measures for the nation’s sprawling network of oil pipelines in its final days, despite resistance from industry and concern that incoming president Donald Trump may scuttle them.

The measures are aimed at preventing increasingly frequent accidents such as a 176,000-gallon spill that fouled a North Dakota creek earlier this month. Thousands more spills over the past decade caused $2.5 billion in damages nationwide and dumped almost 38 million gallons of fuel.

Fights over pipelines have intensified in recent years, illustrated by the dispute over TransCanada’s Keystone XL plan and efforts by American Indians to stop the Dakota Access Pipeline from crossing beneath the Missouri River near the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation…
*see Neutral Perspective: Dakota Access pipeline project’s Pros & Cons

-Canada

From Standing Rock to Trans Mountain, dissent is in the pipeline Shawn McCarthy AND Justine Hunter OTTAWA AND VICTORIA The Globe and Mail (includes correction) Last updated: Thursday, Dec. 15, 2016 4:52PM EST theglobeandmail.com
The fragile victory by protesters at Standing Rock has galvanized indigenous communities north of the border, with some leaders now pledging to block the bitterly contested Trans Mountain pipeline. With his recent approval of that project, write Shawn McCarthy and Justine Hunter, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s biggest challenge may be yet to come
“.. “We are a part of that movement that happened at Standing Rock – a lot of us have been awakened,” said Andre Bear, a Cree from Saskatchewan who is co-chair of the Assembly of First Nations’ youth council. “You see the revitalization that is really bursting out after years of oppression.”

Mr. Bear, a student at the University of Saskatchewan in Saskatoon, visited Standing Rock in August and was impressed by the alliance of indigenous and non-indigenous people. ..”

Model Path of Peace & Love for Reconciliation

Deep Thought: Different Faiths With One Spirit goodnewseverybodycom.wordpress.com

*Note: Some others my think otherwise due to the violence in both sides (e.g. law enforcement and “protestors”), but from my personal experience during the first weekend. It was prayfully and peaceful.

Above are just “some” of the “good” that came out of this social movement (see Neutral Perspective: Dakota Access Pipeline Projects Pros & Cons ), which I pray and hope to continue in 2017. Any others that you would like to add?

Good News Sociology
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Deep Thought: Different Faiths with one Spirit at Standing Rock

Before going to Standing Rock, it was cool to learn the many different backgrounds of faiths represented in this movement..

Clergy Standing with Standing Rock clergyclimateaction.org

500 Clergy Come to Standing Rock after a week of violence


“Published on Nov 16, 2016

“I look at my brothers and sisters of Standing Rock as the moral compass of this country.”

After a week of violence inflicted by law enforcement on unarmed peaceful water protectors, over 480 clergy and people of all faiths arrived in solidarity with Standing Rock. In solidarity, they repudiated the Doctrine of Discovery, denounced the Dakota Access Pipeline, and affirmed the position of the water protectors on the ground.

Video Produced by: Ayşe Gürsöz & Josué Rivas Fotographer”

Image Gallery: 500 interfaith clergy and laity answered the call to stand with Standing Rock By Lynette Wilson | November 3, 2016 episcopaldigitalnetwork.com
“…The Rev. John Floberg, supervising priest of the Episcopal churches on the North Dakota side of Standing Rock, gives instructions to more than 500 people from 20 faith backgrounds gathered in the Oceti Sakowin Camp just after dawn. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News Service..”
Clergy Standing with Standing Rock themennonite.org
Clergy repudiate ‘doctrine of discovery’ as hundreds support indigenous rights at Standing Rock NewsNorman Jameson | November 4, 2016 baptistnews.com
“..From around the country 524 clergy responded to the call of North Dakota priest John Floberg to gather in support of the Sioux Nation’s attempts to stop construction of an encroaching oil pipeline near Standing Rock…”
Standing Rock: A Clergy Call to Action .ucc.org
“…If you are unable to join with other clergy on these dates but would like to come later in the fall or winter when support will still be needed, please coordinate with the Rev. Brooks Berndt, the Environmental Justice Minister for the United Church of Christ…”
500 Clergy Join Peaceful Witness at Standing Rock By Jill Goddard November 7, 2016 uua.org
“…On Thursday, November 3, over 500 clergy – including over 50 Unitarian Universalist clergy – answered the call to come to Standing Rock in solidarity, prayer, and action with the Standing Rock Sioux Nation and the water protectors. The goal of the peaceful interfaith witness was to increase awareness of the situation and to advocate for elected officials to take action to end construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL).
..”

Clergy for Standing Rock: Rev. Kelli Clement, youtube.com
IFCO/Pastors for Peace | An interfaith organization to assist oppressed … ifconews.org
“..Ecumenical agency delivering humanitarian aid to Latin America and the Caribbean. Includes membership information, a list of projects, and a forum…”
CUBA
CARAVAN
2016
, cubacaravan2016.org

“…The Interreligious Foundation for Community Organization (IFCO) is a multi-issue national ecumenical agency, which was founded in 1967 by progressive church leaders and activists. For more than four decades, the Interreligious Foundation for Community Organization (IFCO) has assisted hundreds of community organizations and public policy groups – by providing technical assistance, training organizers, making and administering grants, and using our global network of grassroots organizers, clergy, and other professionals to advance the struggles of oppressed people for justice and self-determination.

.

Read more
..”

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Thoughts, feedback, prayer requests, etc..?

Good News Ministry
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Deep Thought: Was Jesus a “humanitarian”?

humanitarian dictionary.com
“having concern for or helping to improve the welfare and happiness of people. ..”

Charity openbible.info

=>Poor/Poverty/Homeless

The Widow’s Offering Luke 21English Standard Version (ESV) biblegateway.com


21 Jesus[a] looked up and saw the rich putting their gifts into the offering box, 2 and he saw a poor widow put in two small copper coins.[b] 3 And he said, “Truly, I tell you, this poor widow has put in more than all of them. 4 For they all contributed out of their abundance, but she out of her poverty put in all she had to live on.”

“..Sell your possessions, and give to the needy. Provide yourselves with moneybags that do not grow old, with a treasure in the heavens that does not fail, where no thief approaches and no moth destroys. ..”Luke 12

“…Give, and it will be given to you. Good measure, pressed down, shaken together, running over, will be put into your lap. For with the measure you use it will be measured back to you.” ..”Luke 6

“…“When the Son of Man comes in his glory, and all the angels with him, then he will sit on his glorious throne. Before him will be gathered all the nations, and he will separate people one from another as a shepherd separates the sheep from the goats. And he will place the sheep on his right, but the goats on the left. Then the King will say to those on his right, ‘Come, you who are blessed by my Father, inherit the kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world. For I was hungry and you gave me food, I was thirsty and you gave me drink, I was a stranger and you welcomed me, … ..”Matthew 25

“…“Beware of practicing your righteousness before other people in order to be seen by them, for then you will have no reward from your Father who is in heaven. “Thus, when you give to the needy, sound no trumpet before you, as the hypocrites do in the synagogues and in the streets, that they may be praised by others. Truly, I say to you, they have received their reward. But when you give to the needy, do not let your left hand know what your right hand is doing, so that your giving may be in secret. And your Father who sees in secret will reward you…”Matthew 6

“And he answered them, “Whoever has two tunics is to share with him who has none, and whoever has food is to do likewise.”..”Luke 3

“..He has filled the hungry with good things, and the rich he has sent away empty. ..”Luke 1

-Women

Jesus And The Samaritan Woman.avi

John 4 New International Version (NIV)
Jesus Talks With a Samaritan Woman
biblegateway.com
“…4 Now he had to go through Samaria. 5 So he came to a town in Samaria called Sychar, near the plot of ground Jacob had given to his son Joseph. 6 Jacob’s well was there, and Jesus, tired as he was from the journey, sat down by the well. It was about noon.

7 When a Samaritan woman came to draw water, Jesus said to her, “Will you give me a drink?” 8 (His disciples had gone into the town to buy food.)

9 The Samaritan woman said to him, “You are a Jew and I am a Samaritan woman. How can you ask me for a drink?” (For Jews do not associate with Samaritans.[a])

10 Jesus answered her, “If you knew the gift of God and who it is that asks you for a drink, you would have asked him and he would have given you living water.”

11 “Sir,” the woman said, “you have nothing to draw with and the well is deep. Where can you get this living water? 12 Are you greater than our father Jacob, who gave us the well and drank from it himself, as did also his sons and his livestock?”

13 Jesus answered, “Everyone who drinks this water will be thirsty again, 14 but whoever drinks the water I give them will never thirst. Indeed, the water I give them will become in them a spring of water welling up to eternal life.”

15 The woman said to him, “Sir, give me this water so that I won’t get thirsty and have to keep coming here to draw water.”

16 He told her, “Go, call your husband and come back.”

17 “I have no husband,” she replied.

Jesus said to her, “You are right when you say you have no husband. 18 The fact is, you have had five husbands, and the man you now have is not your husband. What you have just said is quite true.”

19 “Sir,” the woman said, “I can see that you are a prophet. 20 Our ancestors worshiped on this mountain, but you Jews claim that the place where we must worship is in Jerusalem.”

21 “Woman,” Jesus replied, “believe me, a time is coming when you will worship the Father neither on this mountain nor in Jerusalem. 22 You Samaritans worship what you do not know; we worship what we do know, for salvation is from the Jews. 23 Yet a time is coming and has now come when the true worshipers will worship the Father in the Spirit and in truth, for they are the kind of worshipers the Father seeks. 24 God is spirit, and his worshipers must worship in the Spirit and in truth.”

25 The woman said, “I know that Messiah” (called Christ) “is coming. When he comes, he will explain everything to us.”

26 Then Jesus declared, “I, the one speaking to you—I am he.”..”

Was Jesus a Humanitarian? Is That Really In The Bible?

MISC:

Humanitarian Jesus: Social Justice and the Cross
by Christopher Benson
3 . 17 . 10 firstthings.com
“…“Don’t forget that Jesus Christ died to save sinners, not to bring about political change.” To those on the Religious Right, they say: “Don’t forget that Jesus spent much of his time helping the sick, the poor, and the needy.” A corrective and a call to action all in one, Humanitarian Jesus shows that evangelism and good works coexist harmoniously when social investment is subservient to and supportive of the church’s primary mission of worship, evangelism, and discipleship…”

Thoughts, suggestions, feedback, etc..?

Good News Sociology
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Folks with Signs Along the Highway Exit Ramps Part 3

I was coming to downtown Minneapolis on the 5th Avenue exit from I-35W (intersects S. 10th St.) when my friends and I came to this stoplight. We saw this guy holding this sign..

“Please Smile for me if you cannot donate”

(paraphrase)

Wished I took a pic of what he was holding. I was inspired by his unique sign, so I was looking around my car right away for something to give him before it turned green. I found an apple that my friends didn’t want to eat, so I handed it to him and said “God bless” after he said “thank you” sincerely.

“Heavenly Father, we know you know this particular individual. We pray that you bless him and that he’ll come to a personal growing relationship with you..in Jesus’ name..Amen”

Good News Minneapolis
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Homeless guy with Sign in St. Paul

I was riding my bicycle to Culvers Restaurant by Sun Ray Shopping Center in East St. Paul to pick up lunch for my family. I rather bike as it was only a quarter of a mile or so and I love the exercise.

While riding my bike, I rode by this “homeless” guy with a sign by the gas station on the corner of Ruth Street and Old Hudson Road. The highway exit ramp to I-94 was block close by due to the construction, so this was probably the reason why this guy was holding his sign in this particular area.

I decided to skip lunch and give him my lunch as he probably need it more. I bought a chicken sandwhich with bbq sauce (along with chicken tenders) and put it in a separate bag for this guy. I then put this bible tract..

…to give him some “soul food ” too! As I rode my bike to deliver this food for him, there was a “mom” and son giving him money and chatting with him. I decided to hand it to him and said “God bless”, which he said the same as he continued to chat with these people. I did a quiet prayer for him as I rode my bike away.

“Heavenly Father, we pray for this particular individual wherever he is right now. We pray that this food (physical and spiritual) will nourish his body and soul…in Jesus’ name..Amen!”

Good News St. Paul
https://www.facebook.com/groups/1407048736201740

Tribute to:

NATIONAL FOOD BANK DAY nationaldaycalendar.com

When you wake up on the first Friday in September make a commitment for National Food Bank Day to contribute to the cause that believes no one should go to bed hungry.

Hunger may be as close as your neighbor or your coworker in the next cubical. Bare cupboards and empty stomachs look just like yours and mine behind closed doors.

Food banks across the country help some of the 42 million men, women and children who struggle with putting food on the table. The reasons range from illness to job loss and a general change in circumstances. Circumstances that can happen to anyone of us.

For parents struggling to make ends meet, the ability to look their children in their eyes over a meal instead of into hungry eyes is a difference made by supporting food banks. Food banks fill the gap for those living on a meager budget.
Many food banks offer educational opportunities that help people change their situation and begin anew. Often, those who have benefited from the programs return to volunteer and contribute to the very food bank that staved off hunger to do the same for others.

HOW TO OBSERVE

Help a neighbor, a friend, coworker or a child by making a donation or volunteering at your local food bank. Food banks take nonperishable food items and cash donations every day. Check their needs list for the fresh items they are seeking.

Use #NationalFoodBankDay to give your local food bank a shout out and to share on social media.

HISTORY
Food Book 50 Logo
Save

St. Mary’s Food Bank founded National Food Bank Day to recognize the outstanding contributions of food banks around the country and to commemorate the establishment of St. Mary’s Food Bank by its founder John ven Hengel in 1967. John ven Hengel came up with the idea of grocery rescue and food banking and the idea spread throughout the country making St. Mary’s Food Bank the very first in the world! In 2017, St. Mary’s celebrates its 50th anniversary!

They distribute 250,000 meals on a daily basis through the efforts of dedicated staff, partnering agencies and volunteers.
Their mission is to alleviate hunger through the gathering and distribution of food while encouraging self-sufficiency, collaboration, advocacy and education.

The Registrar at National Day Calendar proclaimed National Food Bank Day to be observed annually on the first Friday of September beginning in 2017.”

Social Justice: “Cleansing” of the Lower Class?

ASIA

Philippines

The Killing Time: Inside Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte’s War on Drugs Rishi Iyengar / Manila @Iyengarish Aug. 25, 2016 time.com
“..The Philippines is hardly alone. Executing people for drug-related offenses, judicially or otherwise, is characteristic of the region. According to a report last year by drug policy NGO Harm Reduction International, the only countries other than Iran and Saudi Arabia known to have executed drug traffickers since 2010 are all Asian: China, Malaysia, Vietnam, Singapore and Indonesia.

Thailand conducted its own war on drugs in 2003 under then Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra, and the events then — more than 13,000 arrests, over 36,000 cases of people surrendering to police, and nearly 1,200 deaths in its first month — will feel eerily familiar to Filipinos.

Two decades earlier, a wave of extrajudicial executions took place in Indonesia under its autocratic leader Suharto. They came to be known as the petrus killings after the Indonesian acronym for penembak misterius (mysterious gunmen) and had as their supposed aim a reduction in crime. Thousands were murdered in the period between 1983 and 1985.

Now, it’s the Philippines’ turn, and Duterte’s war may turn out to be the most ferocious yet. “This fight against drugs will continue to the last day of my term,” he said.

That day is six years away…”

EUROPE

England

Boris Johnson and the ‘social cleansing’ of London’s estates Tuesday, 9 February 2016 8:26 AM politics.co.uk
‘… On the current evidence, and despite all the rhetoric about the big society and co-operative councils, neither the mayor nor most council cabinet members are really willing to do that. But they should. On the few occasions where councils and housing associations have gone down this route, they’ve ended up building more new homes, at a fraction of the cost, and without the terrible social costs…”

SOUTH AMERICA

Brazil

A New Olympic Sport: City Cleansing rioonwatch.org
“..All over the city there are projects which emphasize cleanliness, from the athlete’s village called “Pure Island” to developments in the Port Zone (part of the “Marvelous Port” Olympic legacy project) which seem to be trying to erase the history of slavery in the region. Real estate developers like Carlos Carvalho want to build entire areas solely for the noble elite, while the City’s strategy in Vila Autódromo has been to hide the favela in newly built housing. Private security guards have even been shipping the homeless out of touristic parts of the city to shelters up to 80 kilometers away. In February, the State Public Defenders joined 25 other organizations in writing a letter to the United Nations to denounce the “irregular apprehension” of minors in the street as a form of “preparatory ‘hygienization’ for the Olympics,” according to R7…”

Colombia

Colombia’s ‘social cleansing’ phenomenon: Exterminating people like bugs
written by Thomas Graham April 21, 2016 colombiareports.com
“Legal authorities continue to turn a blind eye to so-called “social cleansing” practices that kill hundreds of “undesirables” in Colombia’s urban areas every year.

Social cleansing killings have a long, bloody history in Colombia’s major cities. For the most part they remain unsolved, yet to human rights monito…”

To begin with Los Calvos only attacked rapists, but as time passed their targets expanded to include delinquents, as well as drug dealers and addicts. They had their revenge, and they developed a taste for vigilantism. It has been reported that they are still active today, targeting the district’s crack-addicts….

Any other places you know of this “social cleansing” going on? What can “we” do about it?

Living in the Sewers of Colombia

Good News Sociology
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