Neutral Perspective: “Migrant & Immigrant Workers” take Jobs Nobody (Natives) Wants & Do Want?

‘Walmart Wendy’ filmed calling police on city worker she claims looks ‘illegal’ and ‘creepy’ Yahoo Lifestyle Hope Schreiber,Yahoo Lifestyle 6 hours ago (April 11th 2019)yahoo.com
“…A woman in a Glendora, Calif. Walmart parking lot showed her true colors when she was filmed going on a racist rant while asking police to “come get” a man who she claims looked “illegal.”

Want daily pop culture news delivered to your inbox? Sign up here for Yahoo’s newsletter.

On Monday, a Southern California Edison contract worker asked the woman to move her car so he could park the company truck straight. Instead of complying with the request, she rang the police and asked them to come to Walmart and arrest the city worker. At one point in the video, she asks the police dispatcher, “Do you live here? Are you from Africa?”

The video, shared on Facebook by a friend of the contractor, has already been shared nearly 5,000 times…”

DO WANT

How Unskilled Immigrants Hurt Our Economy
A handful of industries get low-cost labor, and the taxpayers foot the bill.

Steven Malanga
Summer 2006 The Social Order
California city-journal.org
“…Velasquez’s story illustrates some of the fault lines in the nation’s current, highly charged, debate on immigration. Since the mid-1960s, America has welcomed nearly 30 million legal immigrants and received perhaps another 15 million illegals, numbers unprecedented in our history. These immigrants have picked our fruit, cleaned our homes, cut our grass, worked in our factories, and washed our cars. But they have also crowded into our hospital emergency rooms, schools, and government-subsidized aid programs, sparking a fierce debate about their contributions to our society and the costs they impose on it…

Yet while these workers add little to our
economy, they come at great cost, because they are not economic abstractions but human beings, with their own culture and ideas—often at odds with our own. Increasing numbers of them arrive with little education and none of the skills necessary to succeed in a modern economy. Many may wind up stuck on our lowest economic rungs, where they will rely on something that immigrants of other generations didn’t have: a vast U.S. welfare and social-services apparatus that has enormously amplified the cost of immigration. Just as welfare reform and other policies are helping to shrink America’s underclass by weaning people off such social programs, we are importing a new, foreign-born underclass. As famed free-market economist Milton Friedman puts it: “It’s just obvious that you can’t have free immigration and a welfare state…..”

Immigration Is Hurting The U.S. Worker By Steven A. Camarota on April 1, 2007 cis.org
“..The United States needs fewer immigrants, not more. Lower levels of immigration, both legal and illegal make sense for my country because the growing number of undereducated people crossing our borders have hurt less educated native-born workers. The U.S. needs to focus on reducing overall immigration levels. This means a drop in the number of immigrants from Latin America, which accounts for half of the new arrivals, many of them at the lower end of the educational spectrum…”

Of Course Immigrants Take Jobs From People; But They Also Create Them For Others Tim Worstall , Contributor Apr 4, 2015 @ 09:07 AM 15,547 forbes.com
“..One of the standard arguments against immigration is that those immigrants then take a job or two that could have been done by some native born worker. This is, of course, entirely true: immigrants do indeed take jobs that could have been done by someone else, native born or not. However, that’s not the entire story. Immigrants also bring with them (whether they are documented or not) their own set of desires and needs. And fulfilling those desires and needs thus creates a job or two that other people can do: some of those will obviously go to the native born. So, yes, immigration does “steal jobs” but it also creates them. What we’d actually like to know then is what is the net effect: and the net effect is undoubtedly beneficial overall. Thus the reason that economists generally believe that immigration is a good thing..”

Migrant Workers Hurt by Slowdown

NEUTRAL

Yes, Immigration Hurts American Workers By GEORGE J. BORJAS September/October 2016 politico.com
The candidates tell drastically different stories about immigration. They’re both skipping half the truth.
“..Here’s the problem with the current immigration debate: Neither side is revealing the whole picture. Trump might cite my work, but he overlooks my findings that the influx of immigrants can potentially be a net good for the nation, increasing the total wealth of the population. Clinton ignores the hard truth that not everyone benefits when immigrants arrive. For many Americans, the influx of immigrants hurts their prospects significantly.

This second message might be hard for many Americans to process, but anyone who tells you that immigration doesn’t have any negative effects doesn’t understand how it really works. When the supply of workers goes up, the price that firms have to pay to hire workers goes down. Wage trends over the past half-century suggest that a 10 percent increase in the number of workers with a particular set of skills probably lowers the wage of that group by at least 3 percent. Even after the economy has fully adjusted, those skill groups that received the most immigrants will still offer lower pay relative to those that received fewer immigrants…

We don’t need to rely on complex statistical calculations to see the harm being done to some workers. Simply look at how employers have reacted. A decade ago, Crider Inc., a chicken processing plant in Georgia, was raided by immigration agents, and 75 percent of its workforce vanished over a single weekend. Shortly after, Crider placed an ad in the local newspaper announcing job openings at higher wages. Similarly, the flood of recent news reports on abuse of the H-1B visa program shows that firms will quickly dismiss their current tech workforce when they find cheaper immigrant workers…

When we look at the overall value of immigration, there’s one more complicating factor: Immigrants receive government assistance at higher rates than natives. The higher cost of all the services provided to immigrants and the lower taxes they pay (because they have lower earnings) inevitably implies that on a year-to-year basis immigration creates a fiscal hole of at least $50 billion—a burden that falls on the native population.”

Are immigrants taking U.S. jobs? debate.org

Does Illegal Immigration Disadvantage American Workers? immigration.procon.org

Does Immigration Cost Jobs? By Viveca Novak Posted on May 13, 2010 factcheck.org
Economists say immigration, legal or illegal, doesn’t hurt American workers.
‘..Miller makes it all sound so easy: Eight million illegal immigrants working in the U.S., 15 million unemployed American citizens and legal immigrants — we could cut the number of unemployed in half if we just booted out the illegal workers. “The numbers are simple,” he says.

The numbers certainly would be simple, if they worked that way. But they don’t…

Immigrant workers “create almost as many” jobs as they occupy, “and maybe more,” said Madeleine Sumption, policy analyst at the nonpartisan Migration Policy Institute, which is funded by a range of foundations, corporations and international organizations. “They often create the jobs they work in.” In addition, “they buy things, and they make the economy bigger,” she told us…”

Do Undocumented Immigrants Hurt The Economy? Not Exactly – Newsy
https://youtu.be/ZoWfjWSQ_yo
*they pay for social security, which “they” will unlikely see using in the future

Stats

The Effects of Immigration on the United States’ budgetmodel.wharton.upenn.edu
“…Despite these increases in labor supply, in many cases immigrants appear to complement American-born workers rather than replacing them. Because less-educated immigrants often lack the linguistic skills required for many jobs, they tend to take jobs in manual labor-intensive occupations such as agriculture and construction. Even for low-skilled native-born workers in these industries, the effects of increased competition from immigrants are ambiguous, as many take advantage of their superior communication abilities and shift into occupations where these skills are more valuable, such as personal services and sales.
Similarly, highly educated immigrants face a disadvantage in communication-intensive jobs, and therefore tend to work in scientific and technical occupations. Highly skilled natives in management, media, and other culture- and language-dependent jobs face little competition from high skilled immigrants. The inflow of foreign labor is, therefore, concentrated in a subset of occupations that tend to employ many immigrants already. Consequently, it is earlier immigrants who face the greatest increase in competitive pressure….

More often than not, immigrants are less educated and their incomes are lower at all ages than those of natives. As a result, immigrants pay less in federal, state, and local taxes and use federally-funded entitlement programs such as Medicaid, SNAP, and other benefits at higher rates than natives. But they are also less likely than comparably low income natives to receive public assistance. Moreover, when they do take public assistance, the average value of benefits received is below average, implying a smaller net cost to the federal government relative to a comparable low income native.

However, immigrants often impose a heavier tax burden on natives at the state and local level. Immigrants — particularly those with low levels of education and income — generally have larger families and more children using public K-12 education, the largest component of state and local budgets. Furthermore, if immigrants’ children are not already fluent English speakers, the per-student cost of education may be substantially higher than for native-born children.
These factors impose short-term costs on state budgets. Over the long term, however, the upward economic mobility and taxpaying lifetime of second generation immigrants more than offset the initial fiscal burden.

NOBODY WANTS

Debunking the Myth of the Job-Stealing Immigrant On Money By ADAM DAVIDSON MARCH 24, 2015 nytimes.com

“..But immigrants aren’t oranges. It might seem intuitive that when there is an increase in the supply of workers, the ones who were here already will make less money or lose their jobs. Immigrants don’t just increase the supply of labor, though; they simultaneously increase demand for it, using the wages they earn to rent apartments, eat food, get haircuts, buy cellphones. That means there are more jobs building apartments, selling food, giving haircuts and dispatching the trucks that move those phones. Immigrants increase the size of the overall population, which means they increase the size of the economy. Logically, if immigrants were “stealing” jobs, so would every young person leaving school and entering the job market; countries should become poorer as they get larger. In reality, of course, the opposite happens.

Most anti-immigration arguments I hear are variations on the Lump of Labor Fallacy. That immigrant has a job. If he didn’t have that job, somebody else, somebody born here, would have it. This argument is wrong, or at least wildly oversimplified. But it feels so correct, so logical. And it’s not just people like my grandfather making that argument. Our government policy is rooted in it…”

Immigrants Aren’t Stealing American Jobs Tanvi Misra, CityLab Oct 21, 2015 theatlantic.com
More evidence surfaces that low-skilled native workers pursue different jobs than their immigrant counterparts.
“..Urban’s Maria E. Enchautegui studied a cohort of 16 million American workers without high school diplomas. She found that within this group, immigrants and native-born workers do very different jobs. In fact, she writes that native and immigrant workers at this level of education are much more dissimilar when it comes to their role in the job market than are workers at other levels of educational attainment. Here’s how she summarizes these results and their implication in a blog post:..”

Immigrants do jobs natives won’t do openborders.info
“..One of the arguments offered by supporters of expanded immigration, particularly in the context of low-skilled immigration to the United States, is that “immigrants do jobs that natives won’t do.” This argument, in the form stated, is incorrect, or at any rate, misleading. However, it does capture a conclusion many economists reach, which some have summarized as: “immigrants do jobs that wouldn’t exist if the immigrants weren’t there to do them.”

This position has been critiqued by many who are critical of immigration. For instance, in a syndicated column titled Immigration Taboos, Thomas Sowell writes:..

However, the actual economic argument is more subtle, and not so easy to ridicule. The key is to remember that prices not only affect the quantity of labor supply, but also the quantity of labor demand. If the supply curve shrinks inward because immigrants are not allowed in the labor market, then the price of labor increases, but the quantity supplied decreases, so overall, there are fewer jobs and less production…”

Foreign Workers Take Jobs Americans Don’t Want

Stats

Jobs Americans Won’t Do? numbersusa.org
“..According to the Pew Hispanic Center, there are approximately 8.3 million illegal workers in the United States. Only 4% of illegal workers work in agriculture (Pew Hispanic Trust, Tables 5 & 6), where most laborers are foreign-born and employers have a legal guestworker program (the H-2a visa) to supply all the seasonal labor they need. Nationally, 25% (of 1.4 million) crop laborers are U.S. citizens; 21% are legal immigrant workers (including H-2a workers); and 53% are illegal workers (National Agricultural Workers Survey). In the midwest, 48% are citizens, 23% are legal permanent residents, and 29% are illegal workers…’

5 Reasons Why Immigrants Do Not Take Natives’ Jobs By Prof. Amelie F. Constant, Ph.D. huffingtonpost.com
“..In my World of Labor article “Do migrants take the jobs of native workers?“ I lay down the pros and cons of the impact of migration on natives and show that ‘migrants rarely take native workers’ jobs, and indeed they tend to boost employment effects in the long term.’ The five reasons are: a) self-employed migrants directly create new jobs; b) migrant innovators indirectly create jobs; c) new migrants fill labor shortages and lubricate the labor markets; d) the high-skilled contribute to technological adaptation and the low-skilled to occupational mobility, specialization, and human capital creation thus creating new jobs; e) by raising demand, immigrants cause firms to expand and hire more workers.

Public opinion research carried out in the U.S., France, Germany and the UK after the 2008-2009 recession also supports that finding. Accordingly, most people believe that immigrants fill job vacancies and many believe that they create jobs, rather than taking jobs away from native workers (see Figure 1)…”

Jobs Americans Won’t Do? A Detailed Look at Immigrant Employment by Occupation By Steven A. Camarota and Karen Zeigler on August 17, 2009 cis.org
“…This analysis tests the often-made argument that immigrants only do jobs Americans don’t want. If the argument is correct, there should be occupations comprised entirely or almost entirely of immigrants. But Census Bureau data collected from 2005 to 2007, which allow for very detailed analysis, show that even before the recession there were only a tiny number of majority-immigrant occupations. (Click here to see detailed table.)

Among the findings:

Of the 465 civilian occupations, only four are majority immigrant. These four occupations account for less than 1 percent of the total U.S. workforce. Moreover, native-born Americans comprise 47 percent of workers in these occupations.
Many jobs often thought to be overwhelmingly immigrant are in fact majority native-born: ..”

Agriculture

‘They’re Scared’: Immigration Fears Exacerbate Migrant Farmworker Shortage 5:48 September 27, 20178:00 AM ET Melissa Block Marisa Penaloza – Square
“..As in the rest of the country, growers in heavily agricultural northern Michigan rely overwhelmingly on migrant laborers to work the fields and orchards. Most of the pickers are from Mexico. Growers say it’s just about impossible to find Americans to do this work. ..”

Wages rise on California farms. Americans still don’t want the job By Natalie Kitroeff and Geoffrey Mohan March 17, 2017 | reporting from Stockton, Calif. latimes.com
Trump’s immigration crackdown is supposed to help U.S. citizens. For California farmers, it’s worsening a desperate labor shortage.
‘..Solorio is one of a growing number of agricultural businessmen who say they face an urgent shortage of workers. The flow of labor began drying up when President Obama tightened the border. Now President Trump is promising to deport more people, raid more companies and build a wall on the southern border…”

That has made California farms a proving ground for the Trump team’s theory that by cutting off the flow of immigrants they will free up more jobs for American-born workers and push up their wages.

So far, the results aren’t encouraging for farmers or domestic workers.

Farmers are being forced to make difficult choices about whether to abandon some of the state’s hallmark fruits and vegetables, move operations abroad, import workers under a special visa or replace them altogether with machines.

Growers who can afford it have already begun raising worker pay well beyond minimum wage. Wages for crop production in California increased by 13% from 2010 to 2015, twice as fast as average pay in the state, according to a Los Angeles Times analysis of data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics…”

-Dairy Farms

The Worst Job In New York: Immigrant America
https://youtu.be/QXUdozfL7iM
“VICE News
Published on Jul 23, 2014
Subscribe to VICE News here: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE-News

Milking cows is a dirty, monotonous job, and as we found out in our latest episode of Immigrant America, it’s not a job many unemployed Americans are willing to do. But for some reason the government doesn’t give dairy farms a way to recruit foreign workers legally, so most feel forced to hire illegal immigrants. This makes the farms and their workers easy targets for immigration authorities looking to fill deportation quotas. We went to upstate New York to try to understand the cat and mouse game going on between dairy farms and immigration authorities. We found a lot of wasted taxpayer money, racial profiling, and a broken system that unnecessarily treats family farmers and hardworking immigrants like criminals.

Read more: Unauthorized Immigrants Paid $100 Billion Into Social Security Over Last Decade: http://bit.ly/1o7iyfZ”

Food Prices Will Go Up

What Would America’s Food Supply Look Like Without Immigrant Labor? Wyatt Marshall Jan 31 2017, 2:00pm munchies.vice.com
If Trump follows through with plans to restrict immigration and deport undocumented immigrants, some industry experts say that farms and factories could be left scrambling, and the price tag for food could inflate dramatically.

Good News Sociology
https://www.facebook.com/groups/139706352858524/

Laid off: ,Out of a job?

A “friend” just told me yesterday that he will be laid off from his job within the next two months, which can be very discouraging for everyone who has been in his shoes. One starts feeling depressed and many questions come to their mind (e.g. what did I do wrong? Was it because of this situation?). Also, one starts believing false lies about themselves (e.g I’m not good enough. I’m a loser. I seem to not be able to do anything right, etc…). How do I know? I had the exact feelings 7+ years ago. I was laid off from my job that I have right now. I even looked back what I wrote at that time…

“.. October 2008 Reflection

All of last week (October 6th-10th), it was in the news 24/7 about our “shrinking downfalling economy”. Weeks ago there was a natural disaster in Texas-Hurricane Ike, which “America” (media) has seem to have forgotten our fellow friends down there. It kind of shows where our priorities we put in our life-money! Anyways, I fell I’ll be adding more to this site for awhile during this so called “heading towards a depression”.

I want to encourage you all that God has a purpose for each individuals through this “difficult season”. I learned this towards the end of last year when I was first layed-off from my job (for a week only as I was called back-in to fill-in a staff leaving for “maternity leave”, which my “full-time”: benefits too was taken away) right before Thanksgiving of 2007. I was then off from work for 3-4 weeks in May, which during this whole time since November-I was seeking God on “what’s next” => pursue a “teaching licensure” in ESL (see GoodnewsEverybody: Liberal Arts-English). …

Here are some resources I found online to equip you at this particular “season”. I mean “season” because your just in a time period that won’t last long. We all go through phases/seasons in life, just keep persevering and don’t give-up!

Laid Off — Now What? career-advice.monster.com

Losing your job can be disorienting and difficult, but you have the power to take action. Yes, the layoff is the end of one chapter in your working life, meaning you need to build yourself back up and find that new beginning. These articles will help you make the most of your situation and come out in the best position possible:….

Current Trend


Target says 1,700 to be laid off

The corporation put a plan in action in hopes of saving $2 billion in costs.
The Associated Press Mar 10th 2015 1:51PM jobs.aol.com
Halliburton list shows layoffs hitting all levels of oil patch
Author: Robert Arnold, Investigative Reporter, rarnold@kprc.com

Published On: Feb 23 2015 10:02:54 PM CST click2houston.com
Dysart Unified School District to lay off more than 100 teachers
Jon Erickson

9:51 PM, Jan 15, 2015 abc15.com

Stories of Professionals

Business

6 Inspiring Stories From People Who Unexpectedly Lost Their Jobs
Jarani Taja, Paid to Exist
Jul. 25, 2013, 2:30 PM businessinsider.com
“…”.. The stories I’m about to share serve as a reminder that even in our darkest times, all is not what it seems.

That even faced with great adversity, you will undoubtedly prevail. That although you might not see it yet, there’s something much bigger in store for you. That the universe is invisibly aligning, and the light at the end of the tunnel is just around the bend. …”..”

  • Michelle Apperson, Teacher Of The Year, Gets Lay-Off Notice From Sacramento School District Amid Budget Cuts
    Posted: 06/15/2012 3:17 pm EDT Updated: 06/15/2012 3:17 pm EDT huffingtonpost.com
  • Famous Failures – YouTube

    Quit

    God told me to quit my job (Testimony) – YouTube

    Testimony: Quit both jobs and FAST for SIX DAYS!! How … – YouTube

    5 Clear Signs God wants you to quit your Job – YouTube

    It Had To Happen | Pastor Steven Furtick

    Move up a level!

    Prayer For Job Promotion – Now Is The Time To Step Up At … – YouTube

    Dream Job?

    I Asked God For My Dream Job and Got It! – CBN.com – YouTube

    How to Manage Finances?

    Another “positive” outcome from being laid-off was that it forced me to budget and buy only “necessary” goods and live more of a healthier life. I realized I wasted money on a lot of “junk” food, so I would cut down or eliminate on this section of my grocery list.

  • How to Manage Finances If You’re Suddenly Laid Off mint.com
  • “…Savings come in several forms, including retirement, smaller goal-oriented savings, large purchase savings, and emergency funds. Your emergency savings help you navigate around potential disaster if you’re suddenly laid off.

    Determine How Much You’ll Need

    At one time, 3 to 6 months set aside was the standard advice. That’s no longer the case. Many financial experts now suggest 6 or even 9 months worth of living expenses are needed to offset the loss of income. That might seem like an enormous goal, but with longer average periods of unemployment, less than 6 months of savings might not be enough….
    Dave Ramsey “Budgeting” Money Makeover – 1/10

  • Laid Off? Here’s How to Get Your Finances in Order
    Don’t let emotions overrun your financial security.
    By Daniel Bortz
    Oct. 17, 2012 | 9:45 a.m. EDT
    money.usnews.com
  • “…To get your finances in order, the first step is filing for unemployment. Most states facilitate the process by enabling people to apply online. The average unemployment benefit in 2011 was $300 per week, which may seem paltry compared to what you were previously making, but it at least helps lessen the load of your expenses. In most states, workers can receive unemployment benefits for up to 26 weeks. Due to the high unemployment period—as of September, the average length of unemployment was 39.8 weeks—some states have extended the benefits past 26 weeks.

    To qualify, you had to have been let go from your job due to no negligent action of your own. If you were fired, you can contest the termination with your state’s Department of Labor, says Joe Heider, a certified financial planner at Rehmann Financial in Cleveland, Ohio. Those who qualify for unemployment can expect to receive the first check within two to three weeks.

    However, Christopher P. Parr, a certified financial planner and president of Parr Financial Solutions in Columbia, Md., warns people not to get too comfortable while collecting unemployment to the point where they don’t push themselves to find a new job….

    Good News Financial
    https://www.facebook.com/groups/426559690751225/

    Life Purpose?


    (see Jeremiah 29:11)

    Sometimes being laid off can be “positive” 🙂 When I got laid off in 2008, it forced me to look for other career possibilities. I was volunteering at the local school teaching English as a Second Language & G.E.D (high school diploma) in my 4th year or so, which I decided to pursue teaching. I ended up taking classes via online for a year or so and got a teaching certificate, which paved the way to my current part-time job teaching the same evening a week.

  • Unemployment: How the Lord Provided When My Husband Lost His Job
    September 24, 2013/ Jamerrill Stewart thebettermom.com
  • “..Recycling metal. My husband is a car guy and has always had extra metal, or even an extra car or two, lying around. He was able to take loads of scrap metal to recycle and make $200-$300 per load. He wasn’t able to do this every week, but when he did get enough metal together it was a huge blessing.

    Yard sales. I pulled together a yard sale and made $250 in one weekend. It was amazing how people bought up items that I considered junk. Anything in our house that wasn’t nailed down was purged in a good yard sale.

    Money in the mail. One day my husband came back from the mailbox with an envelope full of money. His co-workers were so upset over the fact that my husband was fired, and right before the holidays, they took up a collection. It was over $500 cash, plus one man sent an $89 check from his church.

    I got a job. It wasn’t what I wanted to do. I wasn’t being a whiner. I just had so clearly felt the Lord led me to lay down my nursing job, and here I was a year later looking for work again. It was a faith-struggle for me at the time. Nonetheless, the unemployment we were counting on fell through and I knew that eating was important. Even though nurses were having trouble finding jobs at that time in our area, I was able to make one phone call and have a nursing position again. It wasn’t full-time, but it was enough to help us through….

  • Dave Dravecky’s Last Pitch

    His big comeback came to a horrifying end when this San Francisco Giant pitcher broke his arm during a game
    , from cbn.com
  • Being laid off also encourage me to explore my other gifts, talents, skills, etc… I recommend reading this book called “Purpose Driven Life” by Rick Warren. How do you know what is your calling or purpose in life? The analogy in the beginning of the book that encourage me is the line that said, “if you want to know what an invention is, you have to ask the inventor/creator” (paraphrase-> see Rick Warren – Purpose Driven Life Audiobook Ch. 1 from youtube.com).

    This season in my life back in 2008 also built my faith and gave me more compassion for people who have been unemployed.

    Promises for Those Struggling with Unemployment, livingbyfaithblog.com
    What Does the Bible Say About Job Loss? – OpenBible.info from openbible.info
    9 Prayers to get that breakthrough Job (Profitable employment) prayersfire.com

    Have a prayer request?…

    Good News Prayer
    https://www.facebook.com/groups/609542502392314/

    Got any personal stories somewhat similar to the ones above to encourage others out there?

    Financial Advice?

    GoodnewsEverybody.com Financial “Wisdom”, Advice, Budgeting, Tips, etc…

    I was raised in a family with financial challenges and I didn’t want to go through the same trials when I got older. After seeking financial wisdom from God through his Word and others that He has put in my life, I’m proud to say I’m financially free from any debts (currently a co-signer for some credit companies for my brother and a friend of mine). I want to share my story with as many people as I can to help them get out of financial debts. Instead of hiding this knowledgleable resources, I want to share this with as many people as I can. Feel free to contact me on any of this or if you have any suggestions, feedback, questions, or even prayer requests….

    After doing a budgent analysis 2 years ago, I was able to break down some categories where I put most of my money in. These are the following categories I got in order by month:

    Sal:

    High School Days

    I wished we could’ve learned about “financing” earlier , like in high school. I didn’t really “learn” until after college. I grew up not really knowing how much I needed to “save”. I did save money for college back in my high school days. However, I spent my paycheck in my job(s) like it was “candy” coming out of a “gum ball machine”! For example, I wanted the “cool” expensive “Oakley style sunglasses”. However, I didn’t want to spend that much, so I got an almost “second” to near expensive style sunglasses called “Bolle”. Well, within a week or so, I lost these one-hundred dollar pair of fancy expensive sunglasses 😦 ! I was working my fast-food job at Taco Bell. I didn’t like wearing my uniform before walking (2-3 blocks) to work, so I would carry a duffel bag with my work-uniform and change in the restaurant’s Men’s Restroom. While changing, I forgot my sunglasses that I laid on top of the sink or toilet??? Well, when I remembered this, I went back and it was gone 😦 This was the last time I spent this much on “sunglasses”. Since this “life-learning” experience, I ‘ve bought cheap “discounted” sunglasses (e.g. gas stations, discounted grocery stores, etc…); However, I try not wear them if I really need to now (e.g. driving when the sun is setting or rising in front of me), which is another “health-related” (see => Medical: How to improve your eye sight Part Two? goodnewshealthandfitness.wordpress.com ) long story!

    Money Saving Tips For Students | Financial Advice – YouTube

    Money Management Tips For Teens – YouTube

    College Days!

    When I went to college, I was fortunate and blessed (thankful to God) to get a “full-ride” scholarship for 4+ years. However, I still had my “Room & Board” (Fees and Bills) to cover! I lived in the residential halls all 4 years. I look back and wished, I learned how to live “on my own” in “off-campus” housing to learn about “saving money” more! It was expensive living “on-campus” . I should’ve cooked my food and learned how to live in a “house” (e.g. I would’ve learned about utilities and how to “conserve”) off-campus. Well, I was very “gullible” about credit cards. I was “sucked” into applying for every credit card that was given to me in person on campus. I would sign-up just to get a “free” prize (e.g. t-shirt). I didn’t learn much about “credit-limit”. Unfortunately, I would max all of my 3-5 credit cards on this “pyramid scheme” business my sophomore year!

    -Credit Cards

    Financial Advice for College Students + Credit Card Tips – YouTube

    Credit Cards for College Students: Applications, Income … – YouTube

    ->Budgeting

    Budgeting 101 for Current and Future College Students – YouTube

    Financial Literacy – 9 things a college student should know

    Career Life

    Living Paycheck To Paycheck – YouTube

    How To Increase My Income?

    Misc.

    Financial Literacy 101

    William Ackman: Everything You Need to Know About Finance and Investing in Under an Hour

    Q: Let me know what you think and feel free to reply with any feedback, personal suggestions-financial advice/tips, comments, etc…

    more….
    http://financial.goodnewseverybody.com/

    Good News Financial
    https://www.facebook.com/groups/426559690751225/

    Can good come out of these economic times?-from GoodnewsEverybody.com LA: Economics, Economy, etc…

    “Some trust in chariots and some in horses, but we trust in the name of the LORD our God.”Psalm 20:7

    I (Sal) took an Economics (see BUSINESS) class during my junior year at UMM, which I’ll be using a lot what I learn in an up-coming community leadership retreat (September 13th-17th of 2004).

    Community Leadership Opportunities

    Blandin Foundation: Community Leadership Retreat: September 13th-17th of 2004, contact Phil D.  on this application form

    Background Information Inventory On-Line, preparing for the leadership consultation 24 participants will have with a staff at the retreat.

    MBTI Step II, another inventory!

    After attending the retreat, I was reminded of this business economic life-skills learning program called Junior Achivement, which would be a good life lesson for our area youth to get involved.

    What comes up must come down?

    Today (Tuesday, October 10th of 2005) I heard economists predict the the economy of the U.S. will go down by February of 2006. This was predicted today after a series of natural disaster in our nation (Hurricaine Katrina & Rita) and world (Asian Tsunami, South Asian Earthquake, and Hurricaine Stan), which has been costing many U.S. dollars. It’s been awesome to see the U.S. government “giving to others”/”blessing others” despite our own economic/national problems; however, economists feel we will see the financial consequences in the future. As I write this, I feel God will return our giving 7 fold as long we are giving with the right heart and using discernment. There are others in our country who probably have been stingy and greedy, which they (e.g. Enron) might cause our nation’s downfall.

    Well, what should you do? Ask God yourself on what you can do? I did this last week after a message from my local pastor, which I came up with this site…

    Emergency Preparedness

    October 2008 Reflection

    All of last week (October 6th-10th), it was in the news 24/7 about our “shrinking downfalling economy”. Weeks ago there was a natural disaster in Texas-Hurricane Ike, which “America” (media) has seem to have forgotten our fellow friends down there. It kind of shows where our priorities we put in our life-money! Anyways, I fell I’ll be adding more to this site for awhile during this so called “heading towards a depression”.

    I want to encourage you all that God has a purpose for each individuals through this “difficult season”. I learned this towards the end of last year when I was first layed-off from my job (for a week only as I was called back-in to fill-in a staff leaving for “maternity leave”, which my “full-time”: benefits too was taken away) right before Thanksgiving of 2007. I was then off from work for 3-4 weeks in May, which during this whole time since November-I was seeking God on “what’s next” => pursue a “teaching licensure” in ESL (see GoodnewsEverybody: Liberal Arts-English).

    I would love to hear your personal stories, experiences, thoughts, etc… on this!

    Question: Can good come out of these economic times?

    *see GoodnewsEverybody.com Christian Life: Belief, Faith, Hope, Trust, etc….