Peacemaking: Various Ways Between Arabs and Jews

History

Why Jerusalem Matters To Palestine & Israel

Jewish Perspective

THE SIGNIFICANCE OF JERUSALEM IN JUDAISM ijs.org.au
“..Jews have lived in the land of Israel for nearly 4,000 years, going back to the period of the biblical patriarchs (c.1900 BCE). The story of the Jewish people, Israel, its capital, Jerusalem, and the Jewish Temple there, has been one of exile, destruction and rebirth. In its 4,000 years of history Jerusalem has been destroyed many times and many times reborn. There has always remained a Jewish presence in the land of Israel and in Jerusalem, and the Jewish people as a whole always dreamed of returning to and rebuilding it, a longing reflected in the concluding words of Israel’s national anthem, ‘Ha Tikvah’ (‘The Hope’):

“The hope of 2000 years: To live as a free people in our own land, the land of Zion and Jerusalem.”

..”

The Jewish Perspective of Jerusalem – YouTube

Muslim Perspective

The Islamic perspective of Jerusalem soundvision.com
“..The city of Jerusalem is very sacred to Muslims. It is one of the three most sacred cities in Islam. Jerusalem is called al-Quds al-Sharif (the Noble Sacred Place). In order to understand the sacredness of this city in Islam, one has to understand the faith structure of Islam. There are three basic principles of faith in Islam:

1. Belief in the oneness of Allah (Tawhid).
2. Belief in the divine guidance through His chosen Prophets and Messengers (Risalah).
3. Belief in the life after death, divine judgment and heaven and hell (Akhirah).

It is the second principle of faith in Islam in Islam that is directly related to our love and devotion to Jerusalem…”

Christian Perspective

The Significance of Jerusalem to Christians Jerusalem Day Prayer Breakfast speech by Susan Michael By: ICEJ News Posted on: 2 Jun 2011 (All day)
“Jerusalem has always been significant to Christians because of the places there where Jesus ministered and, most importantly, where he died and rose again. This is the obvious and simple significance of Jerusalem to the Christian world. This is why Helen, mother of Constantine, built churches there in the 4th century that commemorated these events in the life of Jesus and is why Christians from every denomination on earth visit Jerusalem and these very churches and sites…”

“..Isaac’s Birth Promised (Genesis 17:13)

15 And God said to Abraham, “As for Sarai your wife, you shall not call her name Sarai, but Sarah4 shall be her name. 16 I will bless her, and moreover, I will cgive5 you a son by her. I will bless her, and dshe shall become nations; kings of peoples shall come from her.” 17 Then Abraham efell on his face fand laughed and said to himself, “Shall a child be born to a man who is a hundred years old? Shall Sarah, who is ninety years old, bear a child?” 18 And Abraham said to God, “Oh that Ishmael might live before you!” 19 God said, “No, but gSarah your wife shall bear you a son, and you shall call his name hIsaac.6 I will establish my covenant with him as an everlasting covenant for his offspring after him. 20 As for Ishmael, I have heard you; behold, I have blessed him and will make him fruitful and imultiply him greatly. He jshall father twelve princes, and kI will make him into a great nation. 21 But lI will establish my covenant with Isaac, mwhom Sarah shall bear to you at this time next year.” ..”

All 3 Have in Common

“..The Call of Abram (Genesis 12 )

12 The Lord had said to Abram, “Go from your country, your people and your father’s household to the land I will show you…”

Both

JITLI 2010: Jewish and arab teens studing koran and bible

The Peacemaker in Jewish-Rabbinic and Arab-Islamic Traditions Daniel Roth
Volume 4. Issue 2, Spring 2011 religionconflictpeace.org

In rabbinic and Islamic law, a distinction is made between a judge engaged in arbitration (tahkim in Arabic, borerut in Hebrew) and a peacemaker engaged in conciliation (pius in Hebrew, solh or sulha in Arabic) or mediation (al wasata in Arabic, peshara in Hebrew). [5] This paper examines four questions regarding the peacemaker as found in Jewish rabbinic and Arab-Islamic traditions:

Who is the ideal peacemaker?
Should the peacemaker pursue peace only through acts of humility and nonviolence, or do certain situations warrant the use of force?
Should an offender approach a victim directly or send a peacemaker first?
Is the peacemaker permitted to lie in order to promote peace?

Each of these questions is examined in light of normative rabbinic and Islamic legal sources as well as descriptive accounts of peacemakers acting within Arab and Jewish societies. [6]
The Ideal Peacemaker

In Jewish rabbinic tradition, Aaron, the older brother of Moses and the first high priest of the Israelites, is the ideal peacemaker, known for “loving and pursuing peace.” [7] Aaron would “pursue peace between a man and his fellow, husband and wife, family and family, tribe and tribe.” [8] Aaron himself is described as never having fought with anyone: “If a man curses him, he says to him, ‘Peace be upon you!’ Should a man quarrel with him, he keeps silent.” [9] In rabbinic literature, the high priest (and eventually the rabbi) was the model peacemaker. One early legend found in the Babylonian Talmud tells the following story:

There were once two men who, being egged on by Satan, quarreled with one another every Friday afternoon. Rabbi Meir once came to the place and stopped them from quarrelling and settled them down for three Friday afternoons. When he had finally made peace between them, he heard Satan say, “Alas for this man [Satan] whom R. Meir has driven from this house!” [10]

In this story Rabbi Meir, one of the most respected rabbis of his time (second century CE, Palestine), made peace between the two individuals just by staying with them, thereby exorcising Satan from the house. [11]

One of the primary roles of the local rabbi, or hacham, was to promote peace in the community. In the sixteenth century, however, a small Jewish community under Ottoman rule believed it better for the communal peace that they not have a hacham. As time went by, communal conflicts increased and the community came to the realization that only a hacham could unite them all again and “mediate the peace, love and brotherhood” between them. [12]

In Jewish rabbinic tradition, the peacemaker was not always a holy or religious leader. Even jesters, according to a legend in the Babylonian Talmud could bridge differences:

Rabbi Beroka Hoza’ah was standing in the market of Debey Lapat. Elijah came and appeared to him. [R. Beroka] asked, “Who, in this market, has a share in the world to come?” He replied “No one.” … In the meantime, two [people] passed by and [Elijah] remarked, “These two have a share in the world to come.” [Rabbi Beroka] asked them, “What is your occupation?” They replied, “We are jesters. When we see people depressed we cheer them up; furthermore, when we see two people quarrelling we strive to make peace between them.” [13]

These jesters, while not appearing to the human eye to be particularly righteous or holy, are identified by the prophet Elijah as having a share in the world to come for their meritorious deeds, such as making peace through the use of humor. [14] In a similarly-themed legend, a distinguished character, though not a rabbi, identifies himself as a peacemaker; according to the legend, he is portrayed as more righteous than the rabbinic figure in the same story who focuses solely on the study of Torah. [15]

In Jewish history, there were individuals referred to as rodfei shalom (pursuers of peace) or mitavchey shalom (peace mediators). These peacemakers were active in communities from eleventh-century Muslim Spain through fifteenth-century Christian Prague and until twentieth-century Morocco. Unlike earlier traditions, such as Aaron, the pursuer of peace, these peacemakers were not holy or religious leaders but generally well-respected laypeople. Also in contrast to Aaron, these peacemakers did not act alone in their pursuit of peace. [16] It is interesting to note that mentions of these community peacemakers ended with the immigration of Jews to Israel from North Africa in the 1950s.

In Islamic tradition, Muhammad, known as the Prophet and Allah’s Apostle, is considered the ideal peacemaker. For example, in the hadith of Sahih al-Bukhari, several accounts of Muhammad making peace are narrated by Sahl bin Sad:

There was a dispute amongst the people of the tribe of Bani ‘Amr bin ‘Auf. The Prophet went to them along with some of his companions in order to make peace between them. … Once the people of Quba fought with each other till they threw stones on each other. When Allah’s Apostle was informed about it, he said, “Let us go to bring about reconciliation between them.” [17]

In several Arab-Islamic societies today, such as rural Jordan, [18] northern Israel, [19] Bedouin groups of Israel’s Negev region,[20] and Sunni communities in Lebanon, [21] the mediator or peacemaker is a well-respected lay leader. [22] These peacemakers may be referred to as members of the jaha (delegation), which in Arabic, according to Elias Jabbour, a peacemaker in northern Israel, “suggests that these people have attained a high level of respect in the region.” [23] The respect given to the peacemaker may be due, for example, to his advanced age, leadership position in the community, or wealth. [24] These peacemakers almost always act as part of a delegation and not alone. [25]

Alternatively, in some Arab-Islamic societies, the peacemaker is a holy or religious leader. For instance, amongst the Berber Bedouin in the Atlas Mountains of Morocco, it is insufficient to be a respected member of society; to be a peacemaker one must also be born into the sect of the “saints.” [26] According to Gellner, these saints serve the Bedouin people living around them, “not only to mediate with God, but also to help with inter- and intra-tribal political mediation.” [27] Gellner also writes that the saints “claimed not to feud or litigate at all. A mediator who was himself involved in a network of hostilities and alliances would not be much use for mediation and sanctuary.” [28] According to Ginat, the saint, as opposed to the peacemaker of Bedouin and rural Arab societies, works alone in mediating conflicts. [29]

Hamzeh has noted that in Shia communities in Lebanon there has been a shift in recent years from the model of respected lay leader as peacemaker to the model of religious leader associated with the Hizbullah as peacemaker. [30] Abu-Nimer also notes that in Gaza, the peacemaker is often a religious leader, such as an imam who may be “the most trusted person in the community because of his strict observance of Islamic values and traditions.” [31]

Both Jewish rabbinic and Arab-Islamic traditions regard the identity of the peacemaker in two ways. One way is that of the religious and holy leader—a high priest, rabbi, saint, or imam, for example—who acts alone in making peace. The second is that of the respected lay leader who generally acts as one member in a delegation of peacemakers. Both of these models sharply contrast with the Western image of the peacemaker or mediator where the peacemaker rejects any claim to power or authority over the conflicting parties; The peacemaker is, instead, responsible only for the mediation process itself. [32]
Humility and the Peacemaker..”

Hundreds of Israeli Jews and Arabs rally for peace
Around 700 people form human chain in north of country, call for coexistence and condemn violence
By JTA and TOI staff October 16, 2015, 9:39 pm timesofisrael.com
“…Approximately 700 Jews and Arabs held hands in a chain in the central Galilee to call for reconciliation amidst a wave of violence throughout Israel over the past few weeks.

The symbolic gathering on Friday afternoon was organized by Givat Haviva, an educational organization that promotes Arab-Jewish coexistence. ..

After the event, entitled “Choosing to Engage,” Givat Haviva held a small ceremony with discussions.

Givat Haviva issued a declaration before the event titled “Call for a Secure and Shared Life in Israel” that condemned “any attack on body, soul or property, as well as any expression of physical or verbal abuse.”…”

Education

Peace when Jews and Arabs educate their children togetherBy Rebecca Bardach March 22, 2017 22:02 jpost.com
“…Golda Meir was one of my heroes growing up – a smart Jewish woman who worked tirelessly, selflessly, on behalf of the Jewish People to secure the establishment and security of the State of Israel. So I was taken by surprise when my children’s school principal, Nadia Kinani, came in to school one day deeply upset after visiting another local school, which had these oft-quoted words of Golda Meir embedded in a huge mural at the school’s entrance: “We will have peace with the Arabs when they love their children more than they hate us.”

Nadia is an Arab mother. She has spent the past 20 years of her life helping found and develop a Jewish-Arab integrated bilingual school in Jerusalem. At the time, this was almost unprecedented in Israel. She and other teachers had to innovate pedagogical approaches so students could learn each other’s languages, traditions, cultures and histories, while helping them commit to a shared future. Even now there are only nine such Jewish-Arab schools in all of Israel…”

Music

The Jewish-Arab Peace Song (w/ English subtitles) – YouTube

Arabs, Jews play in symphony of peace – YouTube

Religion

Jerusalem: Three religions, three families | Faith Matters

Unity gives Jerusalem a prayer: Jews, Muslims and Christians join for worship Hannah Ellis-Petersen in Jerusalem Saturday 24 September 2016 02.00 EDT theguardian.com
Eight religious leaders brought their congregations together for eight days in one room. It was a dangerous move
“..Last week, and for just eight days, a music school in the lowest valley of Jerusalem was transformed into a communal house of prayer, named Amen, bringing together Jewish, Muslim and Christian religious leaders and their congregations to worship together in one room. It was a sight rarely seen in this segregated city.

The project, part of the Jerusalem season of culture, was initiated by Elad-Abblebaum and the Muslim Sufi Sheikh Ihab Balah almost a year ago. They reached out to six other religious figures – two rabbis, a Franciscan monk, a Catholic priest, a Coptic deaconess and a female Muslim community leader – who were very traditional in their beliefs and practices, but also open to discussions with other faiths…”

Sports

Jews and Arabs play soccer for peace Eitan Goldstein|Published: 17.08.16 , 12:44 ynetnews.com
“…A soccer camp for Israeli kids wrapped up with a world cup-style tournament last Thursday. 100 children, aged 12 – 13, were split up into six different teams each representing a “world cup” country. The tournament was made all the more unique for being held in the Israeli-Arab town of Baqa al-Gharbiyye.

..”

Women

Jewish-Arab Women’s Peace Group Delivers Political Message While Avoiding Politics Judy Maltz (Barta’a) Oct 10, 2016 8:38 PM haaretz.com
During the ‘March of Hope,’ Palestinian and Jewish women walk from northern Israel to Jerusalem in support of a peaceful solution to the conflict.
“..About 40 women are participating in the two-hour hike from Katzir, a mainly Jewish town in the Wadi Ara region, to Barta’a. Roughly half of them are Women Wage Peace activists taking part in the entire 200-kilometer trek from Rosh Hanikra to Jerusalem, which began the night after Rosh Hashanah. The rest are joining them for the day…

Women Wage Peace is a grassroots organization founded two years ago, right after Israel’s last war in Gaza.. The group drew its inspiration from Four Mothers, another anti-war movement founded close to 20 years ago, which has been credited with Israel’s ultimate pullout from Lebanon.
..”

Christian Perspective

How to Be ‘Pro-Jesus’ in the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict Interview by Timothy C. Morgan| January 27, 2014 christianitytoday.com
What one leading Israeli Arab evangelical thinks American Christians can do to promote Mideast peace.
“A leading Israeli evangelical, Botrus Mansour, head of the 77-year-old Nazareth Baptist School, is attempting the impossible: to be realistic and hopeful at the same time about peace between Israelis and Palestinians….

.. Inside Israel, the messianic community is becoming larger and more visible. Is it possible for Arab Christians and Israeli messianic believers to work together?

It’s a good idea. We are part of one body of Christ. Messianic Jews and Arab evangelicals might agree on 90 percent of theology. This relationship is a testimony that in Christ we can become one. The barriers and animosity have been demolished, not just with God through Jesus Christ, but also between one another…

Jesus talks about peace, human dignity, and dealing with the other, created in the image of God. Give the other something so that he will not say, “I have nothing to lose. You put me in the corner, so I’m going to fight. I’m going to kill. I’m going to explode myself.”…

Pray that God will preserve the Jews and take care of them. We’re not against the Jews. I’m an Israeli citizen. I’ve known Jews all my life. My personal story is involved with the Jewish people. They have visited my home all my life. Pray for the peace of Jerusalem including Arabs and Jewish people…”

Israel’s Future Steven E. Meyer 03-02-2015 By Steven E. Meyer March 2, 2015 cpjustice.org

“…International Efforts

Europe and the United States have added to tensions in the region and to Israel’s growing isolation. The Europeans have become strong supporters of the Palestinians and several European states have withdrawn economic and financial aid to Israel, scaled back trade, and condemned heavy-handed Israeli military action. Consequently, European policies have enabled Palestinian violence and compelled Israel to dig in deeper.

American efforts to bring peace to the region have been pusillanimous and conflicted. Congress—the heartbeat of American support for Israel—stymies the meager efforts by Republican and Democratic administrations alike to force even the mildest restrictions on both sides, thereby emboldening Israeli intransigence and reinforcing Palestinian resentment. Most recently, the House of Representatives has invited Prime Minister Netanyahu to address Congress on March 3 just before the Israeli election. This not only seems designed by the House leadership to affect the outcome of the Israeli election, but it intrudes into the realm of foreign policy, normally the prerogative of the executive branch.

Peacemaking and Principled Pluralism

The Israeli-Palestinian (Arab) issue is a particularly appropriate peacemaking challenge for Christians. For one, the church has been intimately entwined with the region for centuries as the place of origin of the Gospel. However, the ongoing tensions and conflicts there have led to the dispersal of Arab Christians and the decline of the church. Of the three major religions that claim Jerusalem as a special place, only Christianity lacks a concrete role in its governance. Christians should have a vested interest in peace in the Middle East and a desire to rebuild Christian influence. Christians should have a stake in the outcome of peace efforts, including a role in the administration of Jerusalem. Although placing Jerusalem under international control benefits Christianity, Judaism, and Islam, Christians have been forced to back off because of heavy pressure from Jews and Muslims. This has created additional hurdles to overcome for Christians contributing to peacemaking…”

PEACE


*see Protecting Israel openbible.info

Blessed are the Peacemakers: Israelis and Palestinians … – YouTube

What are other ways we can bring peace?

Groups

Jews & Arabs Refuse To Be Enemies facebook.com

Good News Peace
https://www.facebook.com/groups/639527079395556/

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Now You Know: Chronological Timeline of Passover and it’s Significance

Passover – Ten Commandments


“Uploaded on Apr 16, 2008
This is a montage I found on http://www.tsofar.com/zofar/mashtap/s… and wanted you all to see. It shows us how much G-d loves us. He didn’t do these miracles for any other nation! We should think about that at the Pesach (Passover) Seder. Happy Passover!

What is Passover – Important History and Christian Traditions Russ Jones ChristianPress.com crosswalk.com
“.. In many circles there appears to be an increasing interest in the Jewish roots of the Christian faith. This Easter season numerous congregations across the globe will hold a “Passover Haggadah” or more traditionally known as a “Seder” to gain a greater understanding of the Christian – Jewish relationship. To understand more about the holiday of Passover and how Christians can meaningfully celebrate it today, let’s dig into the history and traditions.
A Brief Passover History

Passover is the oldest and most important religious festival in Judaism, commemorating God’s deliverance of the Hebrews from slavery in Egypt and His creation of the Israelite people.

The festival of Passover begins at sunset on the 14th of Nisan (usually in March or April) and marks the beginning of a seven day celebration which includes the Feast of Unleavened Bread. The highlight of Passover is a communal meal, called the Seder (which means “order,” because of the fixed order of service), which is a time to rejoice and celebrate the deliverance for the Hebrews that God accomplished through the exodus.
What every Christian needs to know about Passover

As many prepare to celebrate the Resurrection of Jesus, knowing the cultural Jewish soil on which Jesus walked is important to a mature and growing Christian faith. Here are a few steps for help along the Passover journey…”

A brief overview of Passover – Hebrew for Christians hebrew4christians.com
“..Pesach, Passover, Pesah. … an unblemished lamb (pesach) and smeared its blood upon the doorposts of the house would … This is the real meaning of Passover. … According to various Jewish sources, the basic timeline for the seven days of …..”

CHRONOLOGY OF THE PASSOVER home.hiwaay.net

Secrets of Bible Time Markers: Passover, Death & Resurrection of Messiah



Published on Aug 10, 2014

You thought you knew everything about the calvary week? The Bible holds many secrets openly available to all. Discover God’s perfect timeline through this study of the holy text.”

The Last Supper – Communion Video

Any feedback, suggestions, comments, etc.. to help build a better content above?

Good News Philosophy
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Religions: Different “character” names of God

-Judaism

Name of G-d in Hebrew


“Published on Oct 30, 2012

The Creator’s name is not “god” and it is not “lord”. Learn God’s true name in Hebrew.

For more info: http://www.worldslastchance.com/

Official WLC Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/TheWLCvideos..”

The Name of G-d jewfaq.org

“..The most important of God’s Names is the four-letter Name represented by the Hebrew letters Yod-Hei-Vav-Hei (YHVH). It is often referred to as the Ineffable Name, the Unutterable Name or the Distinctive Name. Linguistically, it is related to the Hebrew root Hei-Yod-Hei (to be), and reflects the fact that God’s existence is eternal. In scripture, this Name is used when discussing God’s relation with human beings, and when emphasizing his qualities of lovingkindness and mercy. It is frequently shortened to Yah (Yod-Hei), Yahu or Yeho (Yod-Hei-Vav), especially when used in combination with names or phrases, as in Yehoshua (Joshua, meaning “the Lord is my Salvation”), Eliyahu (Elijah, meaning “my God is the Lord”), and Halleluyah (“praise the Lord”). ..”
Names of God in Judaism
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
“..Rabbinic Judaism describes seven names which are so holy that, once written, should not be erased: YHWH, El (“God”), Elohim (“Gods”), Eloah (“God”), Elohai or Elohei (“My God”), El Shaddai (“God Almighty”), and Tzevaot or Sabaoth (“Of Hosts”). Other names are considered mere epithets or titles reflecting different aspects of God,[1] but chumrah sometimes dictates especial care such as the writing of “G-d” instead of “God” in English or saying Ṭēt-Vav (טו, lit. “9-6”) instead of Yōd-Hē (יה, lit. “10-5” but also “Jah”) for the number fifteen in Hebrew.[2]..”
The History And Pronunciation Of God’s True Name , youtube.com

What are the different names of God and what do they mean? gotquestions.org
“..Question: “What are the different names of God and what do they mean?”

Answer: Each of the many names of God describes a different aspect of His many-faceted character. Here are some of the better-known names of God in the Bible:..”

8. Names of God bible.org
“..The names of God give Christians tremendous comfort because they reveal aspects of his nature and character. Proverbs 18:10 says this: “The name of the LORD is a strong tower; the righteous run to it and are safe.” The person who understands God’s names will better understand his character, and therefore, have a tremendous source of strength and protection while enduring the trials of life.

Therefore, in this lesson, we will look at a few of the names of God. First, we will look at Old Testament names and then New Testament names…”

Jehovah Names – Prayer Today Online prayertoday.org

Names of God


“Uploaded on Aug 26, 2007

May you grow closer to understanding our great and mighty God by learning about Him through His names in the Bible.

Names of God | Bible Meanings , from youtube.com
The Names of God in the Old Testament blueletterbible.org
60. The Compound Names of Jehovah: Jireh, Rapha, Nissi bible.org
“Purpose: There is no better way to discover what God is like than to look at His names. In the names considered in this material, we seek to understand how He cares for us….”

Jehovah Rapha (The Lord Who Heals) blueletterbible.org
“..Meaning and Derivation: Jehovah is translated as “The Existing One” or “Lord.” The chief meaning of Jehovah is derived from the Hebrew word Havah meaning “to be” or “to exist.” It also suggests “to become” or specifically “to become known” – this denotes a God who reveals Himself unceasingly. Rapha (râpâ’) means “to restore”, “to heal” or “to make healthful” in Hebrew. When the two words are combined – Jehovah Rapha – it can be translated as “Jehovah Who Heals.” (cf. Jer 30:17; Jer 3:22; Isa 30:26; Isa 61:1; Psa 103:3). Jehovah is the Great Physician who heals the physical and emotional needs of His people…”

-Music

Jehovah Rapha (Lord Heals) by Sal , from youtube.com

Jehovah Jireh (The Lord Will Provide)
“..Meaning and Derivation: Jehovah is translated as “The Existing One” or “Lord.” The chief meaning of Jehovah is derived from the Hebrew word Havah meaning “to be” or “to exist.” It also suggests “to become” or specifically “to become known” – this denotes a God who reveals Himself unceasingly. Jehovah-Jireh is a symbolic name given to Mount Moriah by Abraham to memorialize the intercession of God in the sacrifice of Isaac by providing a substitute for the imminent sacrifice of his son…”

-Music

“Come & let your Provision fall in this place…”, from youtube.com

ISLAM

The Names and Attributes of Allah whyislam.org
“..Allah has described Himself in the Quran through His Names and Attributes. Muslims believe that studying these Names and Attributes is one of the most effective ways of strengthening one’s relationship with God. Each Name and Attribute nourishes a kind of consciousness and humility in man and their study leads one to constantly better their actions.

“The most beautiful names belong to Allah: so call on Him by them.” (Quran, 7:180)

People will enter Paradise by the Mercy of God

The Prophet Muhammad (pbuh) is reported to have said that no man’s good deeds are alone enough to get him admitted into Paradise, but it is only by the Mercy of God that people will enter Paradise. Our deeds are a tool to get close to God to a place where we can be hopeful of His Mercy. (Read more: Life After Death)

Some other Names of Allah that are related to His Mercy (with rough translations) are Al-Karim (the Generous), Al-Halim (the Forbearing), Al-Barr (the Generous), Al-Jawwad (the Bestower of Good), Ar-Rauf (the Kind) and Al-Wahhab (the Bestower).
..
..”

Asmaul Husna – 99 Names of Allah searchtruth.com
Do Christians and Muslims Worship the Same God? By Albert Mohler • December 1, 2013 •billygraham.org
“…As a matter of fact, God takes His name very seriously, and the Ten Commandments include the command that we must not take the name of the Lord in vain. We are to use the names God has given for Himself, and we are to recognize that God takes His name seriously because He desires to be rightly known by His human creatures. We cannot truly know Him if we do not even know His name…”
The god of Islam and the God of Christianity are Not the Same – Here is the Proof


“..Published on Jan 10, 2016

The god of Islam is called Allah and the God of Christianity is called Yahweh and they are Not the Same.
The jesus of Islam is Muslim and the Jesus Christ of Christianity is God’s – Yahweh’s Only Son and they are Not the Same.
Allah & Muhammad’s Islam paradise is the opposite of the Christian Heaven where Yahweh sits and rules.

Christians & Jews worship Yahweh, The God of Israel – The God of Abraham, Jacob and Isaac.

Yahweh in Hebrew means “He exists.” Yahweh is Self-existent.

Muslims worship Allah – the god of the Quran / Koran.

Muhammad was a self-styled prophet who was no prophet at all – May the Police be called upon him.

“Allah” was part of the name of Mohammed’s father, who served 360 idols. Mohammed destroyed 359 of them, kept allah, the chief idol, the moon god, the black stone, & it became the god of Muslims.

The Muslim Allah was a moon god with NO Name, though he was given 99 attributes. Allah is a NOUN means “god” in Arabic. “God” is a TITLE, not a name.
The name Allah was used as the personal name of the Moon god, in addition to the other titles that could be given to him.

..”

Above is just a partial list on this topic that I started to explore more during my “meditation” (devotions) yesterday. Stay tune for more. Feel free to share your “favorite” character or “name” of God…

Good News Philosophy
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Deep Thought: Was Jesus a “humanitarian”?

humanitarian dictionary.com
“having concern for or helping to improve the welfare and happiness of people. ..”

Charity openbible.info

=>Poor/Poverty/Homeless

The Widow’s Offering Luke 21English Standard Version (ESV) biblegateway.com


21 Jesus[a] looked up and saw the rich putting their gifts into the offering box, 2 and he saw a poor widow put in two small copper coins.[b] 3 And he said, “Truly, I tell you, this poor widow has put in more than all of them. 4 For they all contributed out of their abundance, but she out of her poverty put in all she had to live on.”

“..Sell your possessions, and give to the needy. Provide yourselves with moneybags that do not grow old, with a treasure in the heavens that does not fail, where no thief approaches and no moth destroys. ..”Luke 12

“…Give, and it will be given to you. Good measure, pressed down, shaken together, running over, will be put into your lap. For with the measure you use it will be measured back to you.” ..”Luke 6

“…“When the Son of Man comes in his glory, and all the angels with him, then he will sit on his glorious throne. Before him will be gathered all the nations, and he will separate people one from another as a shepherd separates the sheep from the goats. And he will place the sheep on his right, but the goats on the left. Then the King will say to those on his right, ‘Come, you who are blessed by my Father, inherit the kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world. For I was hungry and you gave me food, I was thirsty and you gave me drink, I was a stranger and you welcomed me, … ..”Matthew 25

“…“Beware of practicing your righteousness before other people in order to be seen by them, for then you will have no reward from your Father who is in heaven. “Thus, when you give to the needy, sound no trumpet before you, as the hypocrites do in the synagogues and in the streets, that they may be praised by others. Truly, I say to you, they have received their reward. But when you give to the needy, do not let your left hand know what your right hand is doing, so that your giving may be in secret. And your Father who sees in secret will reward you…”Matthew 6

“And he answered them, “Whoever has two tunics is to share with him who has none, and whoever has food is to do likewise.”..”Luke 3

“..He has filled the hungry with good things, and the rich he has sent away empty. ..”Luke 1

-Women

Jesus And The Samaritan Woman.avi

John 4 New International Version (NIV)
Jesus Talks With a Samaritan Woman
biblegateway.com
“…4 Now he had to go through Samaria. 5 So he came to a town in Samaria called Sychar, near the plot of ground Jacob had given to his son Joseph. 6 Jacob’s well was there, and Jesus, tired as he was from the journey, sat down by the well. It was about noon.

7 When a Samaritan woman came to draw water, Jesus said to her, “Will you give me a drink?” 8 (His disciples had gone into the town to buy food.)

9 The Samaritan woman said to him, “You are a Jew and I am a Samaritan woman. How can you ask me for a drink?” (For Jews do not associate with Samaritans.[a])

10 Jesus answered her, “If you knew the gift of God and who it is that asks you for a drink, you would have asked him and he would have given you living water.”

11 “Sir,” the woman said, “you have nothing to draw with and the well is deep. Where can you get this living water? 12 Are you greater than our father Jacob, who gave us the well and drank from it himself, as did also his sons and his livestock?”

13 Jesus answered, “Everyone who drinks this water will be thirsty again, 14 but whoever drinks the water I give them will never thirst. Indeed, the water I give them will become in them a spring of water welling up to eternal life.”

15 The woman said to him, “Sir, give me this water so that I won’t get thirsty and have to keep coming here to draw water.”

16 He told her, “Go, call your husband and come back.”

17 “I have no husband,” she replied.

Jesus said to her, “You are right when you say you have no husband. 18 The fact is, you have had five husbands, and the man you now have is not your husband. What you have just said is quite true.”

19 “Sir,” the woman said, “I can see that you are a prophet. 20 Our ancestors worshiped on this mountain, but you Jews claim that the place where we must worship is in Jerusalem.”

21 “Woman,” Jesus replied, “believe me, a time is coming when you will worship the Father neither on this mountain nor in Jerusalem. 22 You Samaritans worship what you do not know; we worship what we do know, for salvation is from the Jews. 23 Yet a time is coming and has now come when the true worshipers will worship the Father in the Spirit and in truth, for they are the kind of worshipers the Father seeks. 24 God is spirit, and his worshipers must worship in the Spirit and in truth.”

25 The woman said, “I know that Messiah” (called Christ) “is coming. When he comes, he will explain everything to us.”

26 Then Jesus declared, “I, the one speaking to you—I am he.”..”

Was Jesus a Humanitarian? Is That Really In The Bible?

MISC:

Humanitarian Jesus: Social Justice and the Cross
by Christopher Benson
3 . 17 . 10 firstthings.com
“…“Don’t forget that Jesus Christ died to save sinners, not to bring about political change.” To those on the Religious Right, they say: “Don’t forget that Jesus spent much of his time helping the sick, the poor, and the needy.” A corrective and a call to action all in one, Humanitarian Jesus shows that evangelism and good works coexist harmoniously when social investment is subservient to and supportive of the church’s primary mission of worship, evangelism, and discipleship…”

Thoughts, suggestions, feedback, etc..?

Good News Sociology
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Deep thought: Trinity-Father, Son, and Holy Spirit is One?

Judaism


A Look at the Trinity From a Messianic Jewish Perspective

by Richard Harvey  Hits: 12004 jewsforjesus.org/

Jesus in Genesis: 1. The First Word of the Bible



I asked my dad once how do you convince a Jewish person that Jesus is the Messiah. He told me to show them Jesus in the Old Testament. My first thought was like everyone’s, the Old Testament (The Tanakh) is for the Jews and the New Testament (B’rit Chadashah) is for the Christians. My dad had it right. Jesus is on every page of the Old Testament; you just have to look. To prove my dad’s point, look where Jesus is hiding in plain sight in the very first word of the Bible. God bless you for watching.—John
Check out my cool Hebrew notes photo album at the link below:
https://www.facebook.com/johnkostik/m&#8230;
..”

WOW! This Jewish man turns to Jesus and explains why in a way you never heard before!

“…Published on May 13, 2015

More at: http://www.imetmessiah.com
By: http://www.oneforisrael.org
..”

Good News Yeshua
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Islam

How can Jesus be God when the Hebrew Bible says God is not a man? Cf. Numbers 23:19; 1 Samuel 15:29; Hosea 11:9. answering-islam.org
“…Answer:

None of those biblical texts say God CANNOT be a man, but say that God IS not a man, a major difference:

“God IS not man, that he should lie, or a son of man, that he should change his mind. Has he said, and will he not do it? Or has he spoken, and will he not fulfill it?” Numbers 23:19

“And also the Glory of Israel will not lie or have regret, for he IS not a man, that he should have regret.” 1 Samuel 15:29

“I will not execute my burning anger; I will not again destroy Ephraim; for I am God and not a man, the Holy One in your midst, and I will not come in wrath.” Hosea 11:9

It is true that during the Old Testament period God hadn’t become a man, but this doesn’t deny that God could choose to later become a man, specifically in the Person of the Lord Jesus Christ. The Hebrew Bible itself supports the view that God can become a man, without ceasing to be God, since there are places where God appeared in human form:

“The LORD appeared to Abraham near the great trees of Mamre while he was sitting at the entrance to his tent in the heat of the day. Abraham looked up and saw THREE MEN standing nearby. When he saw them, he hurried from the entrance of his tent to meet them and bowed low to the ground. He said, ‘If I have found favor in your eyes, my lord, do not pass your servant by. Let a little ..”

Good News Yasu
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Others

I’m still doing some more research, but feel free to share any suggestions, feedback, comments, etc.. below…Thanks 🙂

Good News Philosophy
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