Inspirational: Desmond Doss of “Hacksaw Ridge” Movie

Hacksaw Ridge (2016) Official Trailer – “Believe” – Andrew Garfield

Hacksaw Ridge (2016)imdb.com
“..WWII American Army Medic Desmond T. Doss, who served during the Battle of Okinawa, refuses to kill people, and becomes the first man in American history to receive the Medal of Honor without firing a shot. ..”

Hacksaw Ridge (2016) historyvshollywood.com
“…When did Desmond Doss join the U.S. Army?

In researching the Hacksaw Ridge true story, we learned that Desmond Doss was drafted into the United States army in April 1942. He could have gotten a deferment because he worked as a ship joiner at a shipyard in Newport News, Virginia, but he wanted to serve his country. Electing not to bear arms, he made his way into the army medical corps. During March 1944, he shipped out along with the rest of the 77th Division (the Statue of Liberty Division) for the Pacific Theater, first to Guam, then to Leyte in the Philippines, and finally to partake in the allied invasion of Okinawa, an island 340 miles south of mainland Japan (only the latter is chronicled in the movie). “I felt like it was an honor to serve God and country,” Desmond said. “We were fightin’ for our religious liberty and freedom.” -The Conscientious Objector Documentary
..

Why did Desmond T. Doss refuse to bear arms during WWII?

Fact-checking Hacksaw Ridge confirmed that he refused to carry a weapon because of his personal and religious beliefs as a Seventh-day Adventist, which is part of the Protestant sect of Christianity. “My dad bought this Ten Commandments and Lord’s Prayer illustrated on a nice frame, and I had looked at that picture of the Sixth Commandment, ‘Thou shalt not kill.’…


There’s a picture that had Cain and he killed his brother Abel, and I wonder how in the world could a brother do such a thing? I’ve pictured Christ for savin’ life, I wanna be like Christ go savin’ life instead of takin’ life and that’s the reason I take up medicine.”
..
Hacksaw Ridge Movie CLIP – Cowardice (2016) – Andrew Garfield Movie

Matthew 5:38-40 Eye for Eye biblegateway.com

38 “You have heard that it was said, ‘Eye for eye, and tooth for tooth.’[a] 39 But I tell you, do not resist an evil person. If anyone slaps you on the right cheek, turn to them the other cheek also. 40 And if anyone wants to sue you and take your shirt, hand over your coat as well. ..

Did fellow soldiers really accuse Desmond of being a coward and pick on him?

Yes. “He knew he was gonna have difficulty,” said his sister Audrey, “because he doesn’t use a gun.” He went to South Carolina to join the 77th Division and begin his basic training at Fort Jackson. The army initially refused his request to be a medic and assigned him to a rifle company, figuring that peer pressure (and intimidation) might convince him to handle a weapon. His fellow soldiers regarded him as a pest and thought he was putting on an act. The Hacksaw Ridge true story confirms that, like in the movie, they ridiculed him and didn’t want to associate with him. “They made fun of me,” says Desmond, who always carried a Bible in his pocket and prayed before bed. They called him “Holy Jesus” and “Holy Joe.”..

What does it mean to live by the sword and die by the sword? gotquestions.org
Jesus: For War or Peace? tektonics.org
“..Some would say that this seems to be a strong indictment against war, and place it against certain verses where Jesus seems to advocate fighting.

We’ll look at those in a moment, but it should first be noted that this verse is in the form of proverbial wisdom, and is therefore not an advocation of pacifism — nor, by reason of its proverbial nature, is it absolute, as is obvious since not every single person who has drawn a sword (or other weapon) has died by the same means…”
What Does the Bible Say About War? christianbiblereference.org
“…Just War Theory
Clearly, the Christian ideal is total elimination of war and brotherly love among all people. However, in this imperfect world, war may be forced on those who do not desire it. Christian theologians St. Augustine of Hippo (354 – 430) and St. Thomas Aquinas (1225-1274) are primarily responsible for formulating the theory of the Just War which has remained the majority Christian approach to war to this day. There are many variations on the just war theory, but these are the basics:

There must be a just cause for the war.
War must be waged only in response to certain, grave and lasting damage inflicted by an aggressor.
The motive for war must be advancement of good or avoidance of evil.
The ultimate objective of war must be to bring peace.
Revenge, revolt, a desire to harm, dominate, or exploit and similar things are not justification for war.
..”

Hacksaw Ridge (2016 – Movie) Official Clip – “Rescue”

How close did Desmond Doss come to being killed or wounded while rescuing 75 of his fellow soldiers?

The real Desmond Doss considers it a miracle that he made it off the ridge on Okinawa. “When you have explosions and bursts so close you can practically feel it, and not get wounded up there when I should have been killed a number of times. I know who I owe my life to as well as my men. That’s why I like to tell this story to the glory of God, because I know from the human standpoint, I should not be here.” The true story reveals that he spent 12 hours up on the ridge rescuing the men, averaging one man every 10 minutes. -Medal of Honor: Oral Histories

Hacksaw Ridge – “Help Me Get One More” Scene

Hacksaw Ridge (2016) Waiting For Desmond Doss Scene 1080p Clip

Did they put the final assault to take the ridge on hold while Desmond read his Bible?

Yes. The final assault to take the Maeda Escarpment happened on the morning of May 5, 1945, a Saturday, the day of Sabbath, which the Fourth Commandment says should be devoted to prayer. Given that Desmond was the only medic left in B Company, he agreed to go but requested that he first be given time to read his Bible. The delay was approved up the chain of command and the assault was put on hold until Desmond finished his devotions. That day, the 307th Infantry Regiment of the 77th Infantry Division overtook Hacksaw Ridge for good. -The Conscientious Objector Documentary..”

Deleted Scenes | Hacksaw Ridge | Andrew Garfield | A Mel Gibson Film

Go Behind the Scenes of Hacksaw Ridge (2016)


FilmIsNow Movie Bloopers & Extras

Hacksaw Ridge Interview


“Published on Jan 8, 2017

Mel Gibson and Andrew Garfield discuss Hacksaw Ridge”

Hacksaw Ridge | complete press conference with cast, director and producers

The True Story of Hacksaw Ridge and Desmond Doss: the Medal of Honor Winner Who Never Fired a Shot
By Mike Miller Updated February 24, 2017 at 6:29pm EDT people.com
“..The fighting took place on the hellish Maeda Escarpment in April 1945. The battlefield, located on top of a sheer 400-foot cliff, was fortified with a deadly network of Japanese machine gun nests and booby traps. The escarpment, nicknamed Hacksaw Ridge for the treacherously steep cliff, was key to winning the battle of Okinawa. The mission was thought to be near-impossible, and when Doss’s battalion was ordered to retreat, the medic refused to leave his fallen comrades behind.

Facing heavy machine gun and artillery fire, Doss repeatedly ran alone into the kill zone, carrying wounded soldiers to the edge of the cliff and singlehandedly lowering them down to safety. Each time he saved a man’s life, Doss prayed out loud, “Lord, please help me get one more.” By the end of the night he had rescued an estimated 75 men. (The always modest Doss reckoned he saved about 50, but his fellow soldiers gauged it closer to 100. They decided to split the difference.)

The unbelievable story has come to life in the Mel Gibson-directed Hacksaw Ridge, with Andrew Garfield starring as Doss. The film earning a 10-minute standing ovation at its red carpet world premiere at the Venice Film Festival in September…”

Gibson’s ‘Hacksaw Ridge’ Gets 10 Minute Standing Ovation , from youtube.com

Hacksaw Ridge Desmond Doss Documentary-The Conscientious Objector

melissaisonair
“Published on Aug 20, 2016

A documentary by Terry Benedict about a Seventh-day Adventist war hero, Desmond Doss, who was a Conscientious Objector and not only refused to kill but refused to carry a weapon into combat because of his personal beliefs as a Christian.

He served as a medic and you will hear many miraculous examples of the super-human measures Doss was empowered to perform in saving the lives of many of his comrades, while adhering to his religious convictions. It will become very evident that the Power who strengthened Doss was the same Power he so faithfully adhered to.

He received a Medal of Honor given in recognition of the risks he took to save the lives of so many comrades.”

Hacksaw Ridge (2016) historyvshollywood.com
“…Did Desmond T. Doss nearly get blown up by a hand grenade?

Yes. On the night of May 21, 1945, just a half mile past the escarpment on Okinawa, Desmond’s unit inadvertently walked into a company of Japanese soldiers. The unit engaged in hand-to-hand combat with the enemy and Desmond scrambled to treat the wounded. “They begin to throw these hand grenades,” recalled Desmond. “I saw it comin’. There was three other men in the hole with me. They were on the lower side, but I was on the other side lookin’ when they threw the thing. I knew there was no way I could get at it. So I just quickly took my left foot and threw it back to where I thought the grenade might be, and throw my head and helmet to the ground. And not more than half a second later, I felt like I was sailin’ through the air. I was seein’ stars I wasn’t supposed to be seein’, and I knew my legs and body were blown up.” The blast left 17 pieces of shrapnel embedded in Desmond’s body, mostly in his legs. -The Conscientious Objector Documentary..”

TV Show – This Is Your Life – Desmond Doss’s guest appearance


“Published on Oct 17, 2016

“This episode of the This Is Your Life television program features the World War II hero that never carried a gun.””

Desmond Doss, Medal of Honor, WWII

Hacksaw Ridge Ending



MedalOfHonorBook

Desmond Doss featured at 2003 Florida Camp Meeting


“Published on Nov 4, 2016

When Camp Meeting was previously held beginning Memorial Day weekend, a special feature was part of every Monday evening program. In 2003, Florida Camp Meeting was honored by the presence of Desmond T. Doss to joined the program.”
Desmond Doss Funeral


LesterRilea

To all the videos above..

Thanks for posting…very inspirational true story of #desmonddoss https://goodnewseverybodycom.wordpress.com/2017/06/04/inspirational-desmond-doss-of-hacksaw-ridge-movie/

Any other reflections, remarks, comments, etc..?

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Now You Know: World War II History in the Philippines

How Filipino WWII Soldiers Were Written Out of History priceonomics.com
“..By late November, the United States Armed Forces in the Far East (USAFFE) was formed as the merger of the Philippine Commonwealth army and the US Armed Forces stationed in the Philippines. General Douglas MacArthur was made commander of the USAFFE. Ultimately, the allied forces in the Philippine campaign from 1941-1942 consisted of 120,000 Filipino troops and 30,000 American troops, some of whom were Filipino Americans. ..

The Filipino immigrants who were living in the U.S. and had served with the U.S. military during the war returned to civilian life as American citizens. But the Filipinos who enlisted from within the Philippines were not so fortunate. In 1946, President Truman signed the Rescission Act, which retroactively annulled the offer of citizenship and any veterans benefits promised to Filipino troops under measures like the G.I. Bill. Only four thousand Filipino World War II veterans obtained citizenship before the rescission….

As part of the 2009 stimulus bill, Obama payed out a lump sum to surviving Filipino veterans. Filipino American citizens who served in the war were given $15,000, Filipinos who served in the war were given $9,000….

Bataan Death March


“Army Barracks of Corregidor Island”

Filipino Survivors of Bataan Death March Mark 75th Anniversary in San Francisco April 8, 2017 4:00 PM sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com
“…

SAN FRANCISCO (CBS/AP) — Ramon Regalado was starving and sick with malaria when he slipped away from his Japanese captors during the infamous 1942 Bataan Death March in the Philippines, escaping a brutal trudge through steamy jungle that killed hundreds of Americans and thousands of Filipinos who fought for the U.S. during World War II…

More than 250,000 Filipino soldiers served in World War II, when the Philippines were a U.S. territory. But after the war ended, President Harry Truman signed laws that stripped away promises of benefits and citizenship for Filipino veterans.

Only recently have they won back some concessions and acknowledgment, including the nation’s highest civilian honor, the Congressional Gold Medal. The veterans also received lump-sum payments as part of the 2009 stimulus law.

An estimated 18,000 Filipino veterans of World War II are still alive and living in the U.S.

Tens of thousands of Filipino and U.S. troops were forced on the 65-mile (105-kilometer) march and Gaerlan said as many as 650 Americans and 10,000 Filipinos died in stifling heat and at the hands of Japanese soldiers who shot, bayoneted or beat soldiers who fell or stopped for water.

More than 80 percent of those forced on the march were Filipino.

After they arrived at a prison camp set up at Camp O’Donnell, she said, an additional 1,600 Americans and 20,000 Filipinos died from dysentery, starvation and disease…

When the war broke out, Regalado was a member of the Philippine Scouts, a military branch of the U.S. Army for Filipino soldiers.

He and two other soldiers were assigned to feed horses during the march and slipped away when guards were not watching them, Regalado said.

A farmer took in the three, even though the penalty for doing so was death. All were sick with malaria. Only Regalado survived.

He went on to join a guerrilla resistance movement against the Japanese and moved in 1950 to the San Francisco Bay Area to work for the U.S. military.

Regalado credits his survival and long life to his high morale.

While being cared for by the farmer, he recalls telling himself: “I’m not going to die.””

Rescue Missions

The Great Raid of Cabanatuan, Philippines 1/5


gilbertoy69
“Uploaded on Jul 25, 2008

One of the most elaborate and glorious rescues to have never been told in World War 2 was called for. But the Americans cannot do it alone. They called for Filipinos Guerillas Soldiers for the United States Army Forces of the Far East. The raid on Cabanatuan remains the most successful rescue mission in U.S. military history. It was a tremendous success that help push forward in the independence of the Philippines.”

The Epic Account of World War II’s Greatest Rescue Mission: POWs (2001)

American POWs of Japan americanpowsofjapan.blogspot.com
Palawan Massacre December 14, 1944

Palawan Grave 1945
In May 1945, Acting Secretary of State and former US Ambassador to Japan Joseph Grew protested to the Japanese government “the brutal massacre of one hundred fifty prisoners of war at Puerto Princesa, Palawan, Philippines Islands, by the personnel of Ogawa [Toru Ogawa, a company commander in the 131st Airfield Battalion] Tai Construction Corps.”

He angrily charged, ”Such barbaric behavior on the part of the Japanese armed forces is an offense to all civilized people.” His reprimand barely captures the awfulness of the Palawan Massacre in the Philippines on December 14, 1944….”

-Filipino Guerillas /Scouts

Philippine Scouts tribute


“Uploaded on Jan 11, 2011

Veteran’s Day tribute to the Philippine Scouts”

US Rangers, Alamo Scouts, and Filipino guerrillas, on mission to rescue POWs from…HD Stock Footage


CriticalPast
“Published on Apr 3, 2014

Link to order this clip:
http://www.criticalpast.com/video/656…
Historic Stock Footage Archival and Vintage Video Clips in HD.

US Rangers, Alamo Scouts, and Filipino guerrillas, on mission to rescue POWs from Japanese prison camp in World War II

Soldiers of US Army 6th Ranger Battalion, Alamo Scouts, and Filipino guerrillas setting out on a mission to rescue American prisoners of war from a prison camp behind Japanese lines in the Philippines, during World War 2. They move out on foot and ford a stream on their way. Location: Cebu Philippines. Date: January 1945.

Visit us at http://www.CriticalPast.com:
57,000+ broadcast-quality historic clips for immediate download.
Fully digitized and searchable, the CriticalPast collection is one of the largest archival footage collections in the world. All clips are licensed royalty-free, worldwide, in perpetuity. CriticalPast offers immediate downloads of full-resolution HD and SD masters and full-resolution time-coded screeners, 24 hours a day, to serve the needs of broadcast news, TV, film, and publishing professionals worldwide. Still photo images extracted from the vintage footage are also available for immediate download. CriticalPast is your source for imagery of worldwide events, people, and B-roll spanning the 20th century.”

Filipino Guerrillas destroying the Japanese Banzai attack (a clip from The great Raid)


“Uploaded on Apr 9, 2011

a scene form the 2008 movie “The Great Raid”,
Filipino Guerillas together with some american ranger were smashed the Japanese by a suprise attack, wipping them out using the old version of machine gun..
the battle took place outside of Cabanatuan city, Nueva Ecija in the early of 1945, which the operation that night was to liberate the America prisoners of war from the brutal Japanese prison guard..”

Other Stories

War Journal: Rocky Gause Trailer


“Published on Feb 12, 2014

Damon “Rocky” Gause lived one of the most incredible escape stories of World War II.

Involved in the Bataan Death March and then the fall of Corregidor island, Gause and another American, in a leaky old fishing boat, travelled from the Philippine Islands all the way to Australia and the doorstep of General Douglas MacArthur, who could not beleive the men survived their 159 day ordeal in the open ocean.

The Gause story has an ending you won’t believe. The story of Damon “Rocky” Gause and his great escape from the Japanese in WWII is inspirational and will leave you shaking your head in disbelief.

War Journal: The Incredible WWII Escape of Major Damon Rocky Gause tpt.org
“WAR JOURNAL: THE INCREDIBLE WORLD WAR II ESCAPE OF MAJOR DAMON “ROCKY” GAUSE tells the true story of one of the most impossible escapes in World War II. American airman Damon “Rocky” Gause escaped a prison camp on the Bataan Peninsula in 1942, swam to nearby Corregidor Island, and then sailed with U.S. serviceman William Lloyd Osborne in a leaky 20-foot fishing boat from the Philippines to Australia. Fifty-two days and 3,200 miles later, the two Americans reached freedom. Despite facing typhoons, constant threats from Japanese ships, submarines and airplanes, a lack of water and food, and even a visit to the world’s largest leper colony, both Gause and Osborne survived to recount their harrowing ordeal. Filmed in Bataan, Corregidor, and in Manila, the 90-minute documentary is narrated by three-time Emmy Award-winning daytime soap opera star Chandler Massey. Actor Kyle Chandler (NBC’s Friday Night Lights and the films Argo, Zero Dark Thirty and Carol) provides the voice of Rocky Gause, with Tom Kane voicing William Lloyd Osborne.”
War Journal: The Incredible World War II Escape of Major Damon “Rocky” Gause


America Goes To War
“Published on Apr 12, 2017

To order a digital download, stream or DVD go to http://www.tmwmedia.com/productlistin…

War Journal: The Incredible World War II Escape of Major Damon “Rocky” Gause
The true story of one of the most incredible escapes in all of World War II, with an ending that will surprise viewers. Two Americans, Damon Gause and William Lloyd Osborne, both escapees of Bataan-“Rocky” Gause from Corregidor and escaped and sailed from the Philippines to Australia and freedom. It took Gause and Osborne 52 days and 3,200 miles to reach freedom. During the trip the Americans faced typhoons, constant threats from Japanese ships, submarines and airplanes, lack of water and food and even a visit to the world’s largest leper colony. When the two Americans finally arrived at General Douglas MacArthur’s office in Brisbane, Australia after their harrowing journey, the only thing one of the war’s most famous generals could say was “Well, I’ll be damned.” What makes this story so amazing is that both men kept a journal during their travels and also had a small camera on board given to them on one of the islands they visited. We have their daily thoughts and emotions to guide us during their long and treacherous journey, plus some incredible photographs that the men took on their trip.

Salamat (thank you in Tagalog/Filipino) for sharing! Currently re”searching” #ww2history on the #WW2Philippineperspective for this on-going blog https://goodnewseverybodycom.wordpress.com/2017/05/29/now-you-know-world-war-ii-history-in-the-philippines/ Love to collect more as this video will be added! Visit or email me here if you have any other sources I can add.

more…http://asian.goodnewseverybody.com/filipino.military.html

Any other sources you would like to see oontributed here?

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Now you know: What “really” happened in the Vietnam War?


“Pic I took while at Standing Rock: Oceti Sakowin Camp”

Veterans For Peace at Standing Rock veteransforpeace.org
“…The Standing Rock Sioux and their many Indigenous allies have inspired thousands of others to join them on the front lines at Standing Rock. Activists from a spectrum of struggles, including the peace and environmental movements to the Movement for Black Lives and Muslim civil rights, stood on the ground in solidarity. As a result, millions of people have been attracted to the cause. The arrival of thousands of veterans to Standing Rock, covered by national and international media, almost certainly put additional pressure on the Obama administration to do the right thing. The effort and outcome thus far is an example of the power of solidarity and non-violent resistance to right injustice. The people have won an important victory the struggle…”

Viet Nam Vet at Standing Rock Reports 1


“Published on Dec 2, 2016

Listen to this patriot explain is experience at Standing Rock”
AIM Co-Founder Talks about Forgiveness, Nonviolence, and What Comes After Standing Rock Posted: December 7, 2016 Dennis J. Bernstein progressive.org
“…Among the veterans at Standing Rock Monday was Bill Means, a Vietnam vet who returned from fighting a bloody U.S. war of aggression overseas to take on the U.S. government at Wounded Knee. Bill Means is a founding member of the International Indian Treaty Council and co-founder of the American Indian Movement (AIM). Means is a key adviser to the Standing Rock Tribe on their resistance to the pipeline. I spoke with him shortly after he met with the Standing Rock leaders this week about future strategies for the tribe on its continuing resistance to the pipeline…

Bill Means: I feel a brotherhood to those veterans. I was there in Vietnam representing the United States, but one of the things that was beautiful about coming home from that terrible war was that our people still honored us, not because we fought for America but because we fought for the honor of our people. When I returned from Vietnam my cousin gave me an Indian name, my friend gave me a horse, and I was welcomed back to the community with open arms. I think that helped us in our healing from what they now call post traumatic stress. “
*see Deep Thought: What can “we” do to help Veterans with P.T.S.D.? goodnewseverybodycom.wordpress.com
“…I met a farmer from Iowa, a World War II veteran, who said he had to join the fight against this black snake, this pipeline, because the corporations had taken his land under what they call eminent domain. He told me,

“Years ago they had taken some of my father’s land. But it was for a highway, they took some school or churches. But now, they’re taking our land for private corporations, for corporate America. … So, I found out what it is to be an American Indian.”
..”

*see Neutral Perspective: Pro & Anti-Pipeline goodnewseverybodycom.wordpress.com

5 Lies About the Vietnam War You Probably Believe – Cracked.com
-History

The Causes of the Vietnam War – History Learning Site Citation: C N Trueman “The Causes of the Vietnam War” historylearningsite.co.uk. The History Learning Site, 27 Mar 2015. 16 Aug 2016.

“..Before World War Two, Vietnam had been part of the French Empire. During the war, the country had been overrun by the Japanese. When the Japanese retreated, the people of Vietnam took the opportunity to establish their own government lead by Ho Chi Minh. However, after the end of the war, the Allies gave back South Vietnam to the French while the north was left in the hands of the non-communist Chinese. The Nationalist Chinese treated the North Vietnamese very badly and support for Ho Chi Minh grew. He had been removed from power at the end of the war. The Chinese pulled out of North Vietnam in 1946 and the party of Ho Chi Minh took over – the Viet Minh…

South Vietnam also had a population of 16 million. Its first proper leader was Ngo Dinh Diem who was a fanatical catholic. As communism hated religion, Diem hated all that communism stood for. This is why he got America’s support – he had a poor record on human rights but his rule was in the era of the “Domino Theory” and anybody who was anti-communist in the Far East was likely to receive American backing – regardless of their less than savoury background. Ngo ruled as a dictator along with his brother – Nhu. Their government was corrupt and brutal but it was also backed by America…”

-America’s Involvement

Why we went to war in Vietnam BY MICHAEL LIND Dec 20, 2012 legion.org
Confronting the Ugly Truth about America’s Dirty War in Vietnam by William J. Astore 2-11-13 historynewsnetwork.org
“..“to kill Communists and to kill as many of them as possible. Stack ’em like cordwood. Victory was a high body-count … war a matter of arithmetic. The pressure [from the top] on unit commanders to produce enemy corpses was intense, and they in turn communicated it to their troops. This led to such practices as counting civilians as Viet Cong. ‘If it’s dead and Vietnamese, it’s VC,’ was a rule of thumb in the bush It is not surprising, therefore, that some men acquired a contempt for human life and a predilection for taking it.”..

..A line that has always stayed with me from Caputo’s memoir came from one of his NCOs, a Sergeant Colby, who in 1965 told then-Lieutenant Caputo that, “Before you leave here, sir, you’re going to learn that one of the most brutal things in the world is your average nineteen-year-old American boy.” Turse’s study plumbs the depths of such brutality, to include a racist subculture (dehumanizing the Vietnamese as “gooks” and “slopes”) within the U.S. military that facilitated it. Draft an American teenager, teach him to kill, send him to an utterly foreign land in which he can’t distinguish friend from foe, give him power over life and death against a dehumanized enemy, and reward him for generating a high body count in which “If it’s dead and Vietnamese, it’s VC,” and you have an ineluctable recipe for murderous violence…

It’s time our nation found the courage to face those twenty (or fifty) walls of Vietnamese dead. It’s time we faced them with the same sorrow and same regret we reserve for our own wall of dead. Only after we do so can our nation stop glorifying war. Only after we do so can our nation fully heal.

“How the U.S. Got Involved In Vietnam”
By Jeff Drake vietvet.org
“… By the end of 1943, small groups of Vietminh commandos were penetrating into Tonkin, led by Vo Nguyen Giap,(13) the future strategist of Dienbienphu and eventual Commander in Chief of the armies of North Vietnam. By 1945, the Vietminh controlled wide regions of the northernmost provinces and had engaged the full attention of most of the Japanese 21st Division.(14)

Being the only recognized force of some strength opposing the Japanese, the Vietminh received support from the American OSS (Office of Strategic Services). In return, the Vietminh helped rescue downed pilots and provided important intelligence information to OSS agents. A number of OSS officers voiced their admiration for the Vietminh and helped convince OSS leaders to back the Vietminh’s struggle for independence.(15) The Vietnamese fully expected American support due to Roosevelt’s Atlantic Charter, which emphasized self-determination for all peoples — not merely Europeans. In addition, the Vietnamese listened to broadcasts from the US Office of War Information, which often cited US support for colonial peoples struggling for their freedom. ..

As Japan faced defeat at the hands of the Allies, the Vietminh looked forward to Allied support in any future struggle against French colonialism. After all, the Vietminh had given valuable support to the Allies, and Ho expected support and recognition for his newly-established government, the Democratic Republic of Vietnam, in turn. A statement to this effect was even included in his government’s Declaration of Independence, established on September 2, 1945, which stated: “We are convinced that the Allied nations… will not refuse to acknowledge the independence of Viet Nam.”…

With the British and the Chinese finally gone, the Vietminh came under direct pressure from the French. By this time it was obvious that Ho Chi Minh would be receiving no aid from either the US or Russia. Indeed, from Ho’s perspective he had been abandoned by the international community and left alone to deal with France. Economic disaster, spurred by the Chinese occupational forces, and starvation due to Allied bombing of Northern damns, strengthened France’s position. On March 6th, 1946, Ho Chi Minh felt compelled to reach a compromise with the French. Essentially, Ho was forced to make the maximum concessions possible short of forfeiting his dominant position within the Vietnamese nationalist movement. It took everything Ho could do to quell the dissatisfaction of other various nationalist groups with this agreement.

[Note that during 1945 to 1946, Ho Chi Minh had written at least eight letters to Truman and the State Department, asking for America’s help in winning Vietnam’s independence from the French. Ho wrote that world peace was being endangered by French efforts to reconquer Indochina and he requested that the four powers (US, USSR, China and Great Britain) intervene in order to mediate a fair settlement and bring the Indochinese issue before the United Nations.

This was a remarkable repeat of history, for in 1919 following the First World War, Ho Chi Minh had appealed to US Secretary of State Robert Lansing, to gain America’s help in achieving basic civil liberties and an improvement in the living condition for the colonial subjects of French Indochina. This plea was also ignored and no admission was even made that the US had even received the letters.(19)] ..”

-Misc

What Really Happened in Vietnam The North, the South, and the American Defeat Review Essay November/December 2012 Issue By Fredrik Logevall foreignaffairs.com
“…Victory never came. Despite the more than half a million U.S. soldiers President Lyndon Johnson sent to Vietnam, and the more than eight million tons of bombs the U.S. Air Force dropped on Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia from 1962 to 1973, Washington could not achieve its core objective: to preserve an independent, noncommunist South Vietnam for the indefinite future. In January 1973, U.S. and North Vietnamese negotiators signed a cease-fire agreement in Paris; two months later, the last U.S. ground troops left South Vietnam. Both the North and the South soon violated the cease-fire, and large-scale war resumed. On April 29, 1975, the South Vietnamese government collapsed, and Vietnam was reunified under a communist government based in Hanoi. By the time the fighting stopped, it had claimed the lives of three to four million Vietnamese, hundreds of thousands of Cambodians and Laotians, and more than 58,000 Americans. Now, Hanoi’s War, a pathbreaking new book by the historian Lien-Hang Nguyen, illuminates the decision-making behind the North’s relentless resistance, helping readers better understand why the struggle lasted as long as it did and why all those people died. ..”
Vietnam War: What really happened

The Truth about the Vietnam War Jun 23, 2014 Presented by Bruce Herschensohn prageru.com
“..Did the United States win or lose the Vietnam War? We are taught that it was a resounding loss for America, one that proves that intervening in the affairs of other nations is usually misguided. The truth is that our military won the war, but our politicians lost it. The Communists in North Vietnam actually signed a peace treaty, effectively surrendering. But the U.S. Congress didn’t hold up its end of the bargain. In just five minutes, learn the truth about who really lost the Vietnam War..”
The Vietnam War: 5 things you might not know By Katie McLaughlin, CNN Updated 3:47 PM ET, Mon August 25, 2014 cnn.com
“..The Vietnam War began in the decade before, but the conflict, and especially U.S. involvement, escalated in the 1960s. For the first time, Americans witnessed the horrors of war, played out on television screens in their living rooms.
This week’s episode of “The Sixties” explores the war and its impact on American culture, then and now. Here are five facts from the episode that may surprise those too young to remember the Vietnam War:..

“What Vietnam did to America via television was introduce us to a new kind of America,” said author Lawrence Wright. “One that was not pure, one that committed the same kinds of atrocities that are always committed in war, but we had never allowed ourselves to see them.”
Reporter Morley Safer recalled the shock of witnessing Marines burn down 150 houses on the outskirts of the village of Cam Ne. An officer told the newsman that he had been ordered to level the area. Three women were wounded in the attack, one baby was killed, and four people were taken prisoner.
Safer asked a soldier if he had regrets about leaving people homeless, and the soldier replied, “You can’t expect to do your job and feel pity for these people.”
Another soldier told Safer, “I think it’s sad in a way, but I don’t think there’s any other way you can get around it in this kind of a war.”
Americans back home were stunned when the CBS report about the Cam Ne village hit the news.
After the broadcast, Johnson reportedly called then-CBS president, Frank Stanton, and said, “Frank, this is your President, your boys just s–t on the flag of the United States.”..”

The Vietnam War Was Worse Than You Could Ever Imagine | Alternet alternet.org

Vietnam War
Facts, information and articles about The Vietnam War
historynet.com
“..Vietnam War summary: Summary of the Vietnam War: The Vietnam War is the commonly used name for the Second Indochina War, 1954–1973. Usually, it refers to the period when the United States and other members of the SEATO (Southeast Asia Treaty Organization) joined the forces of the Republic of South Vietnam in contesting communist forces comprised of South Vietnamese guerrillas and regular-force units, generally known as Viet Cong (VC), and the North Vietnamese Army (NVA). The U.S. had the largest foreign military presence and basically directed the war from 1965 to 1968. For this reason, in Vietnam today it is known as the American War. It was a direct result of the First Indochina War (1946–1954) between France, which claimed Vietnam as a colony, and the communist forces then known as Viet Minh. In 1973 a “third” Vietnam war began—a continuation, actually—between North and South Vietnam but without significant U.S. involvement. It ended with communist victory in April 1975.

The Vietnam War was the longest in U.S. history, until the war in Afghanistan that began in 2002 and continues at this writing (2013). It was extremely divisive in the U.S., Europe, Australia and elsewhere. Because the U.S. failed to achieve a military victory and the Republic of South Vietnam was ultimately taken over by North Vietnam, the Vietnam experience became known as “the only war America ever lost.” It remains a very controversial topic that continues to affect political and military decisions today..”

Movies

The Quiet American 2002

Music

Simon and Garfunkel – The Sound Of Silence (bombing run)/The Vietnam War

What a Wonderful World by Louis Armstrong – AME 151

Action

Pray for Vietnam War vets and Inodochina region (e.g. Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia, Hmong people, etc..)

#prayforvietnam

“Come & let your Peace fill this….”

This is an on-going topic I’ll be researching for a long time. Feel free to share any additional insights (e.g. websites) that may help with this “controversial” war…

Good News Asia
https://www.facebook.com/groups/657315670977193/

Deep Thought: Power of Forgiveness shown in my life so far…

Lately, this theme of forgiveness has been circulating where ever I go. I had to “let it out” and write about it. I ran into this video on “spiritual warfare” and the speaker shared this quote that really resonated in me…

“The devil loses, when you forgive..” https://youtu.be/X0yb3zdKeZk Any personal stories, feedback, etc..? more.. https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10151998231142550&set=oa.736544596358770&type=3&theater

Above is a post I shared in one of my groups (Good News Love) I created on facebook. I’ve heard there is power when we forgive each other, so I would like to start…

If any of my friends read this, please forgive me if I ever wronged you in anyway. I might’ve forgotten it, so please feel free to contact me and remind me if this will help release any resentment, offense, or hurt that will heal you.


*see other Bible verses on forgiveness

One of the causes of “offense” is due to misunderstanding, which we all quickly prejudge. There are times I reflect on my parents fighting and it’s due to the “failure to communicate” (see “Failure to Communicate”-song I wrote). Can you relate? Feel free to share below…

For those that haven’t met me yet or haven’t encountered any offense from me…yet! 😉 I’m sure there are others that might’ve hurt you in various ways (e.g. abuse). Unfortunately, you might not ever get them to forgive you. However, God (Heavenly Father) knows and I encourage you to go to Him for healing of your past hurts.

I’ll share some of my forgiveness stories:

Back in high school, a former “friend” of mine wanted to befriend me after “ignoring” me most of the later years of “middle school”. Not being a Christian at the time, I wouldn’t forgive him and shun him away. Month later, he died in a head-on-collision car accident (visiting his biological Mom all the way in Colorado). I was torn in pieces when I heard the news and wished I reconciled with him. Please don’t make the dumbest mistake as I did, reconcile with those that has hurt you before it’s too late.

During my college and post-college years, I was interested in learning more about WWII (more of the Pacific arena) due to my family’s history (grandfather got capture by the Japanese and survived as a cook and great-grandfather was presumably killed as he never returned home when scoping the vicinity for any Japanese solders). As I read more books of the horrific atrocities the Japanese did in the Philippines and elsewhere, my heart towards the Japanese grew with more hate :(.. Well, God seems to try to soften my heart by bringing Japanese students to the college I attended. Then He brought them to be my renters in the house I owned. My last renter caught me watching some WWII footage of Japan’s horrific treatment. I tried to turned it off, but he saw it and we ended up having a deep conversation. He ended up asking forgiveness for what his ancestors did. I told him no worries, but in my heart-I felt some more compassion for him and the Japanese people overall.

Lastly, this is between me and my Heavenly Father-I gave my life to Christ my freshmen year in college. I did it after hearing a testimony of this speaker at a local church in Morris. This grabbed my heart and got me off my seat to go to the front (alter) and asked God to forgive me all of my sins. That was just the beginning and still in the journey of my faith (still sinning, but trying to sin-less as I grow in my personal relationship with my “Heavenly Dad” :)..

Above are just summaries of some of my stories on forgiveness-repentance. I’ll be glad to share more, but would love to hear yours first. I would love to disclose and be open/transparent/honest with you with my personal challenges-struggles as “we” can help each other in this journey of forgiveness with the “limited uncertain” time we have on this earth…

Good News Everybody
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more… http://life.goodnewseverybody.com/forgiveness.html

Neutral Perspective: Spanish (others) Colonialism in the Philippines was “good” and “bad”?

My name is Salvador, who is a second generation Filipino American living in Minnesota-U.S.A. My great great grandparents (father’s side) is Spanish, so I would have to say it was “good” that the the “Spanish” colonized the Philippines, but “bad” about the “other stuff” that will be mentioned above.

The Spanish Influence on the Philippines


“Published on May 29, 2012

The Spanish and how they influenced the history and culture of the Philippines.”

“Good”

Advantages of spanish colonization in Philippines? answers.com
“..Spanish colonization in the Philippines brought several advantages, including wealth and monetary prosperity. It also brought the advantage of improved technology to the area. ..”

-British Occupation

Colonialism, how did the PH benefit?
March 31, 2015 8:35 pm manilatimes.net
“…In their tramping around the world, they put in place parliamentary systems of government, legal systems that work, infrastructural administrative systems, postal services and educational systems which, at a glance, appear to be counter to the colonialist model of exploitation, rape and pillage. They also built railways; Argentina, China, Thailand, Chile, Brazil, Mexico (not formal colonies), India, South Africa, Uganda, Malaysia, the USA and Canada. They built roads and established marine passenger transport and air routes. They set up and ran the Chinese customs and postal services for over 100 years even though China was not officially a colony…”

SONA: “Great British Festival,” ipinagdiriwang ngayon sa Metro Manila

-U.S. Occupation

“Legacies of Colonialism”what benefits, if any, there were in colonialism? Give examples. If there were no benefits, explain this view. Examine and explain what you consider to be the most serious… Topic: History enotes.com
“…There were some benefits to colonialism, depending on the country. For example, the United States brought more democracy and economic expansion to the Philippines than would (arguably) have existed if the US had never colonized the islands. As someone who is half-Filipino myself, I am not trying to claim that the US occupation was all for the good. However, the Philippines were, for example, the first country in Asia to have a freely elected national legislature. This, along with the sorts of economic and social (education, hygiene) changes brought by the Americans show that colonialism was not always 100% bad…”

Manila During American Occupation (1920s) – YouTube

-Roads

Kennon Road and Baguio by Ernesto R. Zárate, FPIA gobaguio.com
The epic of Kennon Road is a part of the story of Baguio.
Without it, Baguio would not have survived.
“..La Trinidad, became a foothold to the Cordillera Mountains. Through the years the Spanish tried to institute order, build churches and schools, make trails and introduce the planting of vegetables and coffee…

The coming of the Americans

…As early as 1892, a young American zoologist from Michigan,
Dean Conant Worcester, heard about this fabulous place from one Domingo Sanchez, a member of the Spanish Forestry Bureau. (Worcester would later become a member of the Philippine Commission.) In July 1900, he led a group of Americans on an expedition to the Benguet region and that trip resulted in the birth of Baguio.

The first American explorers were smitten with the weather and landscape and decided that it would be an ideal site for a future city and summer retreat from the sweltering heat of the lowlands. It did not take long for Gov. William Howard Taft (who later became President of the United States) and other officials to agree that this should be the location for the summer capital and health resort of the Philippines…

..Disquieting rumors were also rife as to the practicability of completing the road. There was a difference of opinion between the engineer in charge and one of his immediate subordinates. They could not agree on which route should be followed. The consulting engineer of the commission was thus ordered to make a survey. He reported that the route that was started was the more feasible course, but to complete the project, at least $1,000,000.00 would be needed. Not wanting to relive the experience the Commission had with Engr. Meade, they solicited expert advice, from Colonel Lyman W. V. Kennon, a man of great energy and executive ability, who had had vast experience in engineering work in mountainous country…”


*see Philippines: Baguio City in Benguet Province smiletravelingblog.wordpress.com

…In addition to the roadbed itself, Colonel Kennon constructed 40 bridges—two of which were made of steel, the others of wood. Except for the use of dynamite to blast out solid rock, it must be noted that there were no heavy equipment then—work was done usually with ordinary picks and shovels. This was no small feat in 1905. Still, according to engineering experts, it was the most expensive engineering work at that time, a big drain on the colonial budget….

In other words, what we see and admire as the Zigzag portion of Kennon Road was actually the result of a grave engineering error—a basic blunder where the lower portion of the road did not meet as it should with the upper section. But the Americans did not condemn this mistake—they glorified it. To paraphrase an old Tagalog maxim: “Bato na ginawang ginto.”

Nevertheless, it cannot be denied that the completion of the Kennon Road in 1905, just five years after the American colonial government authorized its construction, opened up Baguio and soon the rest of the Cordillera region to the world. More than that, it spurred the development of Baguio and nearby areas so that in 1920, the city was already a thriving population center.”

Zigzaging Kennon Road, Baguio City, Philippines

DEBATE

-Christianized?
*see Religion: What is Christianity? goodnewseverybodycom.wordpress.com

Spanish Influence on Language, Culture, and Philippine History filipinokastila.tripod.com
“..The Filipino populace embraced Spanish Roman Catholic Christianity almost unquestioningly. The Spanish authorities congregated the scattered Filipino population into clustered village settlements, where they could more easily be instructed and Christianized under a friar’s eye. This policy paved the way for the emergence of the present system of politico-territorial organization of villages, towns, and provinces. At the same time, the compact villages which were literally under the bells of the Roman Catholic Church permitted the regular clergy to wake up the villagers each day, summon them to mass, and subject them to religious indoctrination or cathechismal instruction. This process enabled the Church to play a central role in the lives of the people because it touched every aspect of their existence from birth to growth to marriage to adulthood to death. Whether the natives clearly understood the tenets and dogmas of the Roman Catholic Church is of course another matter. Some scholars claim that the Spaniards only superficially Christianized the Filipinos, most of whom learned to recite the prayers and chants by rote, without any idea as to their meaning. Some native inhabitants became only nominal Christians. At any rate, there is no denying the fact that many Filipinos defended the Catholic faith devotedly. ..”
CHRISTIANITY IN THE PHILIPPINES Professor Susan Russell
Department of Anthropology seasite.niu.edu

“…Christianity in the Philippines Today:

Christianity in the Philippines today, unlike during the Spanish period, is a mixture of nationalistic efforts by local peoples to ‘Filipinize’ Roman Catholicism and the efforts of a variety of Protestant missionizing successes. In the American colonial period, 1900-1946, a lot of Protestant teachers and missionaries came to the Philippines to ‘purify’ what they viewed as the incorrect or ‘syncretic’ characteristics of charismatic blends of Filipino Roman Catholicism. The Aglipayans were among the first to try to Filipinize Roman Catholicism and were popular in the early part of American colonial rule. The Iglesia ni Kristo is another Filipino-founded sect that has found strong support among well-to-do Filipinos.

In remoter parts of the Philippines, where Spanish colonialism and Roman Catholicism never penetrated until the beginning of the 20th century, a variety of Christian missionaries compete for new converts. Seventh Day Adventists and Jehovah’s Witnesses typically go door-to-door, spreading the specific messages that their sects support. In traditional, staunchly Roman Catholic areas, their missionizing efforts and attacks on syncretic forms of Roman Catholicism are often unwelcome. In areas where Roman Catholicism is still fairly recent, the missionaries carry messages that are more carefully listened to by local Filipinos. What was once a truly Roman Catholic country in terms of the population has given way to a variety of forms of Christianity.

In the Luzon highlands, for example, where many indigenous ethno-linguistic groups resisted Spanish rule, Roman Catholic or Anglican priests today have a fairly comfortable accommodation with indigenous forms of ritual and belief. Local peoples follow traditional customs related to burial rites, but often invite Christian priests to celebrate the last rites or formal burial rites in addition. The advantage of this kind of syncretism is that people’s beliefs and support for their traditions are not lost, but simply accommodated with beliefs and practices associated with the newer religion. Many recent Protestant missionaries, in contrast, fail to recognize the value of supporting indigenous customs, and simply attack local religious practices as evil. Their meager success in attracting converts speaks to the need for understanding the context in which American religious practice can flourish…”

Catholicism in the Philippines rlp.hds.harvard.edu

“..By his second term in office, Marcos blamed Catholic priests, many of whom were now openly criticizing him, for fomenting student and leftist protests against his rule. As elsewhere in the world, the Catholic Church in the Philippines was profoundly impacted by Vatican II and was working more closely with impoverished Filipinos on basic issues of social justice. Marcos worked to discredit the Catholic Church, accusing it of sympathizing with Filipino communists. To heighten his own Catholic credentials, he invited Pope Paul VI to the Philippines, though the Pope himself was unwilling to play the role assigned to him and both he and the Church made a clear and concerted effort to sideline Marcos and his wife from official functions…”
*see Deep Thought: What are considered “idols”? goodnewseverybodycom.wordpress.com
What are the positive and negative effects of spanish contributions in the Philippines? answers.yahoo.com
“Let’s answer this via the timeline. First and foremost, the colonization of the Spaniards introduced the Philippines to the “modern world”. As a matter of fact, the Philippines wasn’t even a country when the Spaniards came. It was just a series of islands with different tribes living in different “barangays.” BUT they did have a form of organization. The positive effect simply is that the coming of the Spaniards, aside from bringing together the 1000+ islands under one flag, helped the Philippines become a modern country. The Europeans were at the forefront of progress and modernity at the time. Clearly, one negative effect was the maltreatment of the Spaniards (most particularly the friars) towards the Indios. But a positive effect that grew out of that was the birth of Nationalism, which Rizal and the other ilustrados brought into fruition. Now fast-forward to today. If you notice how divided the nation is in terms of social classes (the poor are the majority in terms of numbers but are the minority in terms of power while the rich are the complete opposite), as well as the corruption, it all goes back to the Spanish colonial times. The way the friars and the Spanish government ran the country is still the same way people run the country today. It’s whoever has the money has the power. Don’t get me wrong, I think it’s unfair to blame the Spaniards for it, since the Philippines has gone this far already. All I’m saying is that corruption, this hacienda mentality, goes all the way back to the Spanish colonial period. I hope this answers your question.
By the way, I think the Church, originally wasn’t so good, but at the same time it wasn’t so bad either. The Spaniards used it to “brainwash” the Indios into doing what they (the colonizers) wanted (e.g. the friars were one of the most corrupt people during the Spanish colonial period but no one could touch them because they were “God’s servants”). But the Church also brought the people together and now is part of the beautiful and colorful Filipino culture…”- DJA · 6 years ago …

Effects Of Spanish Colonization In The Philippines Free … studymode.com
Conflict in Philippines: The After-Effects of Colonization
History Day

by Mark Reniel Zarsadias on 29 May 2013 prezi.com

-U.S. Occupation

American Influences in the Philippines – YouTube
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cyGwnCj8RVg
*education system, colonial mentality, resources taken, etc…

Impact of American Colonization in the Philippines

American Colonial Period

ADVANTAGES AND DISADVANTAGES OF IMPERIALISM IN THE PHILIPPINES

“Bad”

10 Reasons Why Life Was Better In Pre-Colonial Philippines
By FilipiKnow | 11/11/2014 filipiknow.net
“While Filipinos nowadays are fairly knowledgeable of the Spanish, American, and Japanese eras in the Philippines, the same cannot be said when it comes to the country’s pre-colonial era. Which is a shame actually, because even before the coming of the three foreign races, our ancestors were pretty much living in a veritable paradise….”

-U.S. Occupation

Colonial Mentality, “Damaged Culture,” IMSCF of Filipinos: Its Roots thefilipinomind.com
“…Americanized: conditioned to knowingly or unknowingly think and analyze economic and political issues in his own homeland (and abroad) from the American point of view.

In the long-run, his alienated heart and mind brought to the Filipino and the homeland only ever-deepening poverty, and its consequent illiteracy, hunger and damaged culture. ..”
US War Crimes in the Phillipines – world future fund worldfuturefund.org
“…For all the talk of bringing “civilization” to the Philippines, American commanders responded to the Filipino insurgency with the utmost brutality. Over the course of the next decade, and especially in the first few years of the conflict, it became commonplace for entire villages to be burned and whole populations to be imprisoned in concentration camps. No mercy was accorded to Filipino prisoner, a large number of whom were shot. This certainly was not in keeping with the spirit of “benevolent assimilation” proclaimed by President McKinley.

From Liberators to Killers: American Attitudes Toward Filipinos

The attitudes of American commanders involved in pacifying the Philippines are remarkable for both their disdain for the people they had allegedly “liberated” and their willingness to resort to the most ruthless methods in suppressing resistance. For example, General J.M. Bell, wrote in December 1901:..”

The Filipino-American War 1899-1902 – YouTube

The Philippine American War in 4 Minutes – YouTube

The Philippine American War-The Shocking Truth
https://youtu.be/bN2wrZGcs8s
“OurPlanetExplained
Published on Jun 25, 2016
Hi my name is Joshua Petrikat. This video is about the shocking truth of the Philippine-American War. Many textbooks including the one used for the school I went to purposely hid this topic because of facts that embarrass the United States and contradict what the US originally said about foreign policy. In this video I talk about many ignored and hidden facts of the Philippine-American War and prove that textbooks often hide this part of American history. The series Hidden History will be a new regular series where I will talk about history that is usually not covered in history books. This is my first video for this series so I hope you will enjoy it. Please share, like, and subscribe!

-Japanese

CULTURAL BRIDGE PRODUCTIONS:
Amerikanitos, life during the japanese occupation of the philippines
johnsheaodonnell.com
“..[The Japanese invasion of Luzon consisted of air attacks from December 9 through the 12th. On the evening of the twelfth, the Japanese were reported to be landing at Vigan in Northern Luzon and Japanese naval forces were sited off Pangasinan Province heading south.]

After a while we were informed that it wasn’t safe underneath the house because the Japanese might parachute to the ground. We could hear gunfire, but I didn’t know what was happening. We decided to abandon the house and go sleep outside with numerous other families (about fifty) on the grass away from the houses and other buildings. There were lots of rumors about deaths of soldiers and everyone was praying. We heard that gas masks were being distributed at the community store so I went to get some for our family. When I arrived, I was told that each family was only to receive one gas mask so I went back to where our family was and told my mother. She told me, “Don’t take one then. If only one will live, the rest will die. We might as well all die together. So we’ll pray, and God will protect us.” ..”

*see GoodnewsEverybody.com Filipino: Military-Spanish-American War, World War II History, etc.. asian.goodnewseverybody.com

Philippine History World War 2 and Japanese Occupation – YouTube

MISC.

Philippine independence declared history.com
“June 12th 1898-This Day in History..”

What are your thoughts? Any other sources that can support any of the sides above?

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Personal Life Messages from the movie Unbroken

I watched the anticipating movie “Unbroken” the other day (CHRISTmas) with my parents (my grandfather was captured as a POW as a “Filipino” civilian and survived as a cook) and still absorbing the personal messages from this inspirational movie in this season in my life. I was first introduced to this real-life story (Laura Hillenbrand’s “Unbroken”) by Neil, pastor of Harvest Community Church (Fargo, ND) and host to a weekly morning Bible study-fellowship group I attend in Morris, who gave me to read and share with one of my friends (college student from Japan renter) years ago. Unfortunately, my renter wasn’t interested in reading this book, but was inspired by the story. I got more interested in this story when Neil shared about this book was going to be movie on facebook. I’ve been looking forward to this movie since this Spring and now anxious to share about it with others.

Zamperini’s life story has taught me many life virtues (e.g. perseverance, gratefulness, commitment, and forgiveness) in this point of my life, which I’ll try to share as many of them down below. One of them is perseverance, which the stories he shared of what he endured during WWII is very inspirational. I’ve read many stories from that war, which has helped me to not complain and be more grateful no matter what challenges I’m facing in my life. The sacrifices many soldiers faced (including my own parents’ country-Philippines-> Filipino Military
Bataan Uncensored Paperback – December, 1991
, a must read book!) during that war helped my generation to reap the blessings we have right now. It’s important to never forgot our own history (U.S., Philippines, and any other nation), so we won’t take for granted what we are blessed with.

One of the memorable scenes or lines (motivational-inspirational quotes) that stuck out the most was when Louis made that covenant-commitment to God…

“If you get me through this I swear I’ll dedicate my whole life to you. Please”-Louis Zamperini (from briandoddonleadership.com)

I made a similar promise to God (Heavenly Father) before giving my life to Him back in the winter of 1996. I went skiing at a ski resort (Andes Tower Hills in Kensington, Minnesota). I went down hill skiing with a bunch of college friends (international students) and wanted to show off, so I just jumped on this chair life not knowing how far and big the hill I would be down hill skiing at. Well, when I got to the top, I realize this was higher than I thought and already forgot how to ski. I haven’t gone down hill skiing for years (should’ve gone on the smaller hill or bunny hill to get some practice). Well, this would be called, “Pride before the fall”. There was no way down but to go with my skis, so I had to fall 4x or so to finally decided to walk (after feeling my knee really swollen or hurt). I went to the ER at the local hospital (Morris, MN) and was at the X-Ray room. The doctor took an X-Ray and left the room by myself. This was when I had my “first” BIG encounter with God. I was more concerned about the financial cost of the medical expense than what happened to me physically. I then just called out to God and told Him-“God, if your real. Heal me and I”ll follow You”. Well, the doctor came back and told me that I didn’t break anything, which would be the beginning of my journey of faith (see testimony) Ever made a promise (e.g. Matthew 5:37-“Let your yes, be “YES”) with God, family, friends, etc…? I challenge and encourage you to “follow-through”!

I read and heard many stories of the atrocities in World War II and many wars before and after. Even though this movie just showed one perspective of one American’s experience. The torture that he and many others out there is very “inhumane”. Unfortunately, we as a county didn’t learn from this and still use this to this day (e.g. Shocking cases in CIA report reveal an American torture program in disarray – Spencer Ackerman in New York Tuesday 9 December 2014 ) This is an embarrassment as a nation to this world as we “preached” against inhumanitarian acts of other nations (e.g. North Korea, China, Russia, Iran, etc..).

In my response to what our nation has done and even myself (I too have “wrong” people in different ways and levels due to sin)…”forgive them for they do not know what they do”. Zamperini’s story can be applied with what’s going on today (e.g. Ferguson-we need to forgive each other for the wrong that’s been done to one another). There are “good” and “bad” cops-same with any group of people. We can’t “judge” or “stereotype” (e.g. NOT all Somolians are “evil” as the movie “Black Hawk Down” might stereotype these people group) any group because of the actions of a “few” of a group of people (e.g. race, nationality, political party, religion, institution, etc..) The real “enemy” is satan and his cronies (demons) that try to deceive and divide the human race to “fight” one another. It’s God’s love that is shared in the Gospel (Good News) of Jesus Christ behind the message of Zamerini’s forgiveness!

Is there someone out there that has hurt (e.g. abuse) you in the past? Just as Zamperini had one-the “Bird”-was a “bully” or “tormentor” while he was Prisoner of War. When Zamperini went home after the war, he was like many veterans that would suffer from PTSD. He would have nightmares, which I too had them at times growing-up for different reasons. Do you have trouble sleeping at night? Well, Zamperini started to sleep better after his “encounter” with God at a Billy Graham Crusade and forgave his “enemy” (abuser, bully, etc..). Have you forgave that individual(s) that hurt you in the past? It’s not easy, right? You can’t do it on your own because you need that strength from God alone, which I personally (e.g. my own bully story) got when I gave my life to Him.

Ephesians 4:32New International Version (NIV)https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Ephesians+4%3A32&version=ESV32 Be kind and compassionate to one another, forgiving each other, just as in Christ God forgave you.Good News Lovehttps://www.facebook.com/groups/1418219528396722/http://www.openbible.info/topics/forgivenessIan McCormack - an Atheist - Dead on Morgue Slab - Goes to Hell, then to Heaven and Back!! http://youtu.be/59mRZ1Vj8ZUmore...  http://life.goodnewseverybody.com/forgiveness.html

If you have read this book or watched the movie, curious-what was your famous line/quote/scene in the movie? why? what did you learn? How are you applying it in your life to this day?

IMG_0927
“Movie theater in Oakdale, Minnesota where I saw the movie “Unbroken” with parents on CHRISTmas Day

Good News Movies
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