Folks with Signs Along the Highway Exit Ramps or Other Places Part 4

On Saturday, September 15th 2017-I was just exiting of Highway 280 going to University Avenue (towards Minneapolis to visit a friend) from I-94 (St. Paul side). I saw one of those “homeless guys with signs” again, which I was prepared. Earlier, I got bag of bottle water read with invitation “tickets” for a free meal at Union Gospel Mission Twin Cities‘ homeless shelters, which anyone can print online…

Give a Ticket of Hope

..this would be the first person to “hand this ticket” too…


I ran quickly to my trunk as there was a red light and handed to this guy saying “God bless you” as the green light came on. I didn’t have time to chat, but I quickly prayed for him again as I might’ve drove by him again (can’t tell with the pic) across the bridge (pic above) when I was going back to St. Paul.

Hope this encourage you to do something similar or better, whatever God lays in your heart. Feel free to come back for possible other related stories like this or share one of yours down below…

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Reflection: Church Service-“Glory of God in and out of the “church walls”

Below are some of the songs that we sung during “worship music” time at church this past Sunday (April 2nd 2017), which I had to reflect and share on how God personally spoke to me through each individual song. Feel free to share yours down below…

Music: Karaoke-“Shekinah Glory” by Crazy lil’ Sal creativemusicartsy.wordpress.com

“I Worship You In The Spirit” Shekinah Glory Ministry lyrics

Sal: May this song be a prayer daily! We need more of Him throughout the week (not just on church days). “We want more” (releasing of His power to give us strength or whether for His healing power to be show to the people around you that might need it).
How does this song speak to you?

Music: Karaoke-“Holy Spirit” (originally by Bryan & Katie Torwalt) by Crazy lil’ Sal creativemusicartsy.wordpress.com

Holy Spirit – Bryan and Katie Torwalt – Lyric Video

Sal: Let us bring His presence outside of the “Church” walls! ..to our families, communities, workplace, nations, etc…! After recording this and singing it again, I remembered how this particular verse took out..

“..Help up become more aware of your presence…”

I pray that we all become more aware of your presence and how God is trying to “speak” to us in our daily life circumstances.

How does this song speak to you?

Music: Karaoke-“Come Alive… Dry Bones” (originally by Lauren Daigle) by Crazy lil’ Sal creativemusicartsy.wordpress.com

“Come Alive (Dry Bones)” featuring Lauren Daigle – Live from the CentricWorship Retreat

Sal: I thought of the game of “trench” I used to play at school growing -up on how we had to use a kick ball or something soft (ball) and hit one of our opponents to get freed from the “dungeon” behind enemy lines. We as “believers” need to take an “active” role (e.g. intercessory prayer and asking God how we can “reach out” to them) like this game on “rescuing” fellow brethren who have “backslidden” from their faith.

How does this song speak to you?

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Spotlight: Who was Martin Luther King Jr.?

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. drmartinlutherkingjr.com
The Greatest Orator For Peace And Love
“..The ultimate weakness of violence
is that it is a descending spiral,
begetting the very thing it seeks to destroy.
Instead of diminishing evil, it multiplies it.
Through violence you may murder the liar,
but you cannot murder the lie, nor establish the truth.
Through violence you murder the hater,
but you do not murder hate.
In fact, violence merely increases hate….
Returning violence for violence multiples violence,
adding deeper darkness to a night already devoid of stars.
Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that.
Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that.
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr…”

Martin Luther King, Jr. – Mini Bio


“Uploaded on Jan 8, 2010

A short biography of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. He is widely considered the most influential leader of the American civil rights movement. He fought to overturn Jim Crow segregation laws and eliminate social and economic differences between blacks and whites. King’s speeches and famous quotes continue to inspire millions today.

20 Interesting Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Facts todayifoundout.com
“1) His name was originally Michael, not Martin. His father was also Michael King, hence why Martin Luther King Jr. was originally named Michael King Jr. However, after a trip to Germany in 1931, Michael King Sr. changed his own name in homage to historic German theologian Martin Luther. Michael King Jr. was two years old at the time and King Sr. made the decision to change his son’s name to Martin Luther as well….

3) King wasn’t the only one to die at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis on April 4, 1968. After he was killed, one of the hotel workers, Lorraine Bailey (who was also the wife of the motel owner and who it was named after), upon seeing King get shot, had a heart attack and later died from this.

4) Also on the day King was killed, he was out on the balcony for a smoke. While you’ll be hard pressed to find a picture of him smoking, he smoked regularly, though had a habit of hiding this partially due to the stigma, particularly within the church at the time, but also because he didn’t want his kids to take up smoking, and so didn’t like pictures of himself doing it, nor did he like to smoke when they were around. …

7) He almost didn’t become a minister. After graduating from college, he still had serious doubts about Christianity and the Bible and told his father (who was a Baptist minister, as his grandfather had also been) that he didn’t want to be a minister and instead was considering becoming a doctor or a lawyer. He later decided that the Bible had “many profound truths which one cannot escape” and chose to become a minister, entering seminary at Crozer Theological Seminary in Pennsylvania. …

10) King convinced “Uhura” on Star Trek, Nichelle Nichols (who incidentally later went on to work for NASA), to continue on with the role after the first season. Nichols stated he told her not to leave the show because she was not only playing a black person as a main character on TV, but she was also playing a character that didn’t conform to the stereotypical black person of the day, usually portrayed. Rather, Uhura was portrayed as an intelligent member of the crew and an equal to those around her….”

*see Nichelle Nichols imdb.com
“..was born Grace Nichols on December 28, 1932 in Robbins, Illinois. She began her show business career at age 16 as a singer with Duke Ellington in a ballet she created for one of his compositions and later sang with his band. After switching to acting, she was twice nominated for the Sarah Siddons Award for best actress in “The …..”

SPEECHES

The Archive | The Martin Luther King Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social … thekingcenter.org

“..There are nearly a million documents associated with the life of Martin Luther King Jr. These pages will present a more dynamic view than is often seen of Dr. King’s life and times. The documents reveal the scholar, the father, and the pastor. Through these papers we see the United States of America at one of its most vulnerable, most honest and perhaps most human moments in history. There are letters bearing the official marks of royalty and the equally regal compositions of children. You will see speeches, telegrams, scribbled notes, patient admonitions and urgent pleas. This spotlight shows you a glimpse of the remarkable history within this collection…”
The Speeches of Martin Luther King Jr. npr.org
Remembering Key Addresses, Sermons by the Civil Rights Leader
Martin Luther King, Jr. | National Archives archives.gov

“..Martin Luther King, Jr.

On August 28, 1963, Martin Luther King Jr., delivered a speech to a massive group of civil rights marchers gathered around the Lincoln memorial in Washington DC. The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom brought together the nations most prominent civil rights leaders, along with tens of thousands of marchers, to press the United States government for equality. The culmination of this event was the influential and most memorable speech of Dr. King’s career. Popularly known as the “I have a Dream” speech, the words of Martin Luther King, Jr. influenced the Federal government to take more direct actions to more fully realize racial equality.

Mister Maestro, Inc., and Twentieth Century Fox Records Company recorded the speech and offered the recording for sale. Dr. King and his attorneys claimed that the speech was copyrighted and the recording violated that copyright. The court found in favor of Dr. King. Among the papers filed in the case and available at the National Archives at New York City is a deposition given by Martin Luther King, Jr. and signed in his own hand…”

Martin Luther King – I Have A Dream Speech – August 28, 1963 (Full Speech)


“Published on Jan 21, 2013

Subscribe
-~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
I Have a Dream Speech
Martin Luther King’s Address at March on Washington
August 28, 1963. Washington, D.C.
..”

Related:

My Country ‘Tis of Thee (arr. D. Willcocks) — Washington National Cathedral Choir , from youtube.com

Martin Luther King Speaks! “I’ve Been to the Mountaintop” (Full) , from youtube.com
“Published on Jun 10, 2015

Martin Luther King Speaks! “I’ve Been to the Mountaintop” (Full)
3 April 1968 Memphis, Tennessee. Would would become King’s final speech, he talks in support of striking Memphis sanitation workers.

Martin Luther King’s Final Speech: ‘I’ve Been to the Mountaintop’ — The Full Text By THE REV MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. MEMPHIS, Tenn., April 3, 1968 abcnews.go.com

Thank you very kindly, my friends. As I listened to Ralph Abernathy and his eloquent and generous introduction and then thought about myself, I wondered who he was talking about. It’s always good to have your closest friend and associate to say something good about you. And Ralph Abernathy is the best friend that I have in the world. I’m delighted to see each of you here tonight in spite of a storm warning. You reveal that you are determined to go on anyhow.

Something is happening in Memphis; something is happening in our world. And you know, if I were standing at the beginning of time, with the possibility of taking a kind of general and panoramic view of the whole of human history up to now, and the Almighty said to me, “Martin Luther King, which age would you like to live in?” I would take my mental flight by Egypt and I would watch God’s children in their magnificent trek from the dark dungeons of Egypt through, or rather across the Red Sea, through the wilderness on toward the promised land. And in spite of its magnificence, I wouldn’t stop there.

I would move on by Greece and take my mind to Mount Olympus. And I would see Plato, Aristotle, Socrates, Euripides and Aristophanes assembled around the Parthenon. And I would watch them around the Parthenon as they discussed the great and eternal issues of reality. But I wouldn’t stop there.

I would go on, even to the great heyday of the Roman Empire. And I would see developments around there, through various emperors and leaders. But I wouldn’t stop there.

I would even come up to the day of the Renaissance, and get a quick picture of all that the Renaissance did for the cultural and aesthetic life of man. But I wouldn’t stop there.

I would even go by the way that the man for whom I am named had his habitat. And I would watch Martin Luther as he tacked his ninety-five theses on the door at the church of Wittenberg. But I wouldn’t stop there. I would come on up even to 1863, and watch a vacillating President by the name of Abraham Lincoln finally come to the conclusion that he had to sign the Emancipation Proclamation. But I wouldn’t stop there.

I would even come up to the early thirties, and see a man grappling with the problems of the bankruptcy of his nation. And come with an eloquent cry that we have nothing to fear but “fear itself.” But I wouldn’t stop there. Strangely enough, I would turn to the Almighty, and say, “If you allow me to live just a few years in the second half of the 20th century, I will be happy.”

Now that’s a strange statement to make, because the world is all messed up. The nation is sick. Trouble is in the land; confusion all around. That’s a strange statement. But I know, somehow, that only when it is dark enough can you see the stars. And I see God working in this period of the twentieth century in a way that men, in some strange way, are responding. Something is happening in our world. The masses of people are rising up. And wherever they are assembled today, whether they are in Johannesburg, South Africa; Nairobi, Kenya; Accra, Ghana; New York City; Atlanta, Georgia; Jackson, Mississippi; or Memphis, Tennessee — the cry is always the same: “We want to be free.”

And another reason that I’m happy to live in this period is that we have been forced to a point where we are going to have to grapple with the problems that men have been trying to grapple with through history, but the demands didn’t force them to do it. Survival demands that we grapple with them. Men, for years now, have been talking about war and peace. But now, no longer can they just talk about it. It is no longer a choice between violence and nonviolence in this world; it’s nonviolence or nonexistence. That is where we are today.

And also in the human rights revolution, if something isn’t done, and done in a hurry, to bring the colored peoples of the world out of their long years of poverty, their long years of hurt and neglect, the whole world is doomed. Now, I’m just happy that God has allowed me to live in this period to see what is unfolding. And I’m happy that He’s allowed me to be in Memphis.

I can remember — I can remember when Negroes were just going around as Ralph has said, so often, scratching where they didn’t itch, and laughing when they were not tickled. But that day is all over. We mean business now, and we are determined to gain our rightful place in God’s world.

And that’s all this whole thing is about. We aren’t engaged in any negative protest and in any negative arguments with anybody. We are saying that we are determined to be men. We are determined to be people. We are saying — We are saying that we are God’s children. And that we are God’s children, we don’t have to live like we are forced to live.

Now, what does all of this mean in this great period of history? It means that we’ve got to stay together. We’ve got to stay together and maintain unity. You know, whenever Pharaoh wanted to prolong the period of slavery in Egypt, he had a favorite, favorite formula for doing it. What was that? He kept the slaves fighting among themselves. But whenever the slaves get together, something happens in Pharaoh’s court, and he cannot hold the slaves in slavery. When the slaves get together, that’s the beginning of getting out of slavery. Now let us maintain unity.

Secondly, let us keep the issues where they are. The issue is injustice. The issue is the refusal of Memphis to be fair and honest in its dealings with its public servants, who happen to be sanitation workers. Now, we’ve got to keep attention on that. That’s always the problem with a little violence. You know what happened the other day, and the press dealt only with the window-breaking. I read the articles. They very seldom got around to mentioning the fact that one thousand, three hundred sanitation workers are on strike, and that Memphis is not being fair to them, and that Mayor Loeb is in dire need of a doctor. They didn’t get around to that.

Now we’re going to march again, and we’ve got to march again, in order to put the issue where it is supposed to be — and force everybody to see that there are thirteen hundred of God’s children here suffering, sometimes going hungry, going through dark and dreary nights wondering how this thing is going to come out. That’s the issue. And we’ve got to say to the nation: We know how it’s coming out. For when people get caught up with that which is right and they are willing to sacrifice for it, there is no stopping point short of victory. We aren’t going to let any mace stop us. We are masters in our nonviolent movement in disarming police forces; they don’t know what to do. I’ve seen them so often. I remember in Birmingham, Alabama, when we were in that majestic struggle there, we would move out of the 16th Street Baptist Church day after day; by the hundreds we would move out. And Bull Connor would tell them to send the dogs forth, and they did come; but we just went before the dogs singing, “Ain’t gonna let nobody turn me around.”

Bull Connor next would say, “Turn the fire hoses on.” And as I said to you the other night, Bull Connor didn’t know history. He knew a kind of physics that somehow didn’t relate to the transphysics that we knew about. And that was the fact that there was a certain kind of fire that no water could put out. And we went before the fire hoses; we had known water. If we were Baptist or some other denominations, we had been immersed. If we were Methodist, and some others, we had been sprinkled, but we knew water. That couldn’t stop us.

And we just went on before the dogs and we would look at them; and we’d go on before the water hoses and we would look at it, and we’d just go on singing “Over my head I see freedom in the air.” And then we would be thrown in the paddy wagons, and sometimes we were stacked in there like sardines in a can. And they would throw us in, and old Bull would say, “Take ’em off,” and they did; and we would just go in the paddy wagon singing, “We Shall Overcome.”

And every now and then we’d get in jail, and we’d see the jailers looking through the windows being moved by our prayers, and being moved by our words and our songs. And there was a power there which Bull Connor couldn’t adjust to; and so we ended up transforming Bull into a steer, and we won our struggle in Birmingham. Now we’ve got to go on in Memphis just like that. I call upon you to be with us when we go out Monday.

Now about injunctions: We have an injunction and we’re going into court tomorrow morning to fight this illegal, unconstitutional injunction. All we say to America is, “Be true to what you said on paper.” If I lived in China or even Russia, or any totalitarian country, maybe I could understand some of these illegal injunctions. Maybe I could understand the denial of certain basic First Amendment privileges, because they hadn’t committed themselves to that over there.

But somewhere I read of the freedom of assembly. Somewhere I read of the freedom of speech.

Somewhere I read of the freedom of press. Somewhere I read that the greatness of America is the right to protest for right. And so just as I say, we aren’t going to let dogs or water hoses turn us around, we aren’t going to let any injunction turn us around. We are going on.

We need all of you. And you know what’s beautiful to me is to see all of these ministers of the Gospel. It’s a marvelous picture. Who is it that is supposed to articulate the longings and aspirations of the people more than the preacher? Somehow the preacher must have a kind of fire shut up in his bones. And whenever injustice is around he tell it. Somehow the preacher must be an Amos, and saith, “When God speaks who can but prophesy?” Again with Amos, “Let justice roll down like waters and righteousness like a mighty stream.” Somehow the preacher must say with Jesus, “The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, because he hath anointed me,” and he’s anointed me to deal with the problems of the poor.”

And I want to commend the preachers, under the leadership of these noble men: James Lawson, one who has been in this struggle for many years; he’s been to jail for struggling; he’s been kicked out of Vanderbilt University for this struggle, but he’s still going on, fighting for the rights of his people. Reverend Ralph Jackson, Billy Kiles; I could just go right on down the list, but time will not permit.

But I want to thank all of them. And I want you to thank them, because so often, preachers aren’t concerned about anything but themselves. And I’m always happy to see a relevant ministry.

It’s all right to talk about “long white robes over yonder,” in all of its symbolism. But ultimately people want some suits and dresses and shoes to wear down here! It’s all right to talk about “streets flowing with milk and honey,” but God has commanded us to be concerned about the slums down here, and his children who can’t eat three square meals a day. It’s all right to talk about the new Jerusalem, but one day, God’s preacher must talk about the new New York, the new Atlanta, the new Philadelphia, the new Los Angeles, the new Memphis, Tennessee. This is what we have to do.

Now the other thing we’ll have to do is this: Always anchor our external direct action with the power of economic withdrawal. Now, we are poor people. Individually, we are poor when you compare us with white society in America. We are poor. Never stop and forget that collectively — that means all of us together — collectively we are richer than all the nations in the world, with the exception of nine. Did you ever think about that?

After you leave the United States, Soviet Russia, Great Britain, West Germany, France, and I could name the others, the American Negro collectively is richer than most nations of the world. We have an annual income of more than thirty billion dollars a year, which is more than all of the exports of the United States, and more than the national budget of Canada. Did you know that? That’s power right there, if we know how to pool it.

We don’t have to argue with anybody. We don’t have to curse and go around acting bad with our words. We don’t need any bricks and bottles. We don’t need any Molotov cocktails. We just need to go around to these stores, and to these massive industries in our country, and say, “God sent us by here, to say to you that you’re not treating his children right. And we’ve come by here to ask you to make the first item on your agenda fair treatment, where God’s children are concerned.

Now, if you are not prepared to do that, we do have an agenda that we must follow. And our agenda calls for withdrawing economic support from you.”

And so, as a result of this, we are asking you tonight, to go out and tell your neighbors not to buy Coca-Cola in Memphis. Go by and tell them not to buy Sealtest milk. Tell them not to buy — what is the other bread? — Wonder Bread. And what is the other bread company, Jesse? Tell them not to buy Hart’s bread. As Jesse Jackson has said, up to now, only the garbage men have been feeling pain; now we must kind of redistribute the pain.

We are choosing these companies because they haven’t been fair in their hiring policies; and we are choosing them because they can begin the process of saying they are going to support the needs and the rights of these men who are on strike. And then they can move on town — downtown and tell Mayor Loeb to do what is right.

But not only that, we’ve got to strengthen black institutions. I call upon you to take your money out of the banks downtown and deposit your money in Tri-State Bank. We want a “bank-in” movement in Memphis. Go by the savings and loan association. I’m not asking you something that we don’t do ourselves at SCLC. Judge Hooks and others will tell you that we have an account here in the savings and loan association from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

We are telling you to follow what we are doing. Put your money there. You have six or seven black insurance companies here in the city of Memphis. Take out your insurance there. We want to have an “insurance-in.”

Now these are some practical things that we can do. We begin the process of building a greater economic base. And at the same time, we are putting pressure where it really hurts. I ask you to follow through here.

Now, let me say as I move to my conclusion that we’ve got to give ourselves to this struggle until the end.

Nothing would be more tragic than to stop at this point in Memphis. We’ve got to see it through. And when we have our march, you need to be there. If it means leaving work, if it means leaving school — be there. Be concerned about your brother. You may not be on strike. But either we go up together, or we go down together.

Let us develop a kind of dangerous unselfishness. One day a man came to Jesus, and he wanted to raise some questions about some vital matters of life. At points he wanted to trick Jesus, and show him that he knew a little more than Jesus knew and throw him off base…. Now that question could have easily ended up in a philosophical and theological debate. But Jesus immediately pulled that question from mid-air, and placed it on a dangerous curve between Jerusalem and Jericho. And he talked about a certain man, who fell among thieves. You remember that a Levite and a priest passed by on the other side.

They didn’t stop to help him. And finally a man of another race came by. He got down from his beast, decided not to be compassionate by proxy. But he got down with him, administered first aid, and helped the man in need. Jesus ended up saying, this was the good man, this was the great man, because he had the capacity to project the “I” into the “thou,” and to be concerned about his brother.

Now you know, we use our imagination a great deal to try to determine why the priest and the Levite didn’t stop. At times we say they were busy going to a church meeting, an ecclesiastical gathering, and they had to get on down to Jerusalem so they wouldn’t be late for their meeting. At other times we would speculate that there was a religious law that “One who was engaged in religious ceremonials was not to touch a human body twenty-four hours before the ceremony.” And every now and then we begin to wonder whether maybe they were not going down to Jerusalem — or down to Jericho, rather to organize a “Jericho Road Improvement Association.”

That’s a possibility. Maybe they felt that it was better to deal with the problem from the causal root, rather than to get bogged down with an individual effect.

But I’m going to tell you what my imagination tells me. It’s possible that those men were afraid. You see, the Jericho road is a dangerous road. I remember when Mrs. King and I were first in Jerusalem. We rented a car and drove from Jerusalem down to Jericho. And as soon as we got on that road, I said to my wife, “I can see why Jesus used this as the setting for his parable.” It’s a winding, meandering road. It’s really conducive for ambushing. You start out in Jerusalem, which is about 1200 miles — or rather 1200 feet above sea level. And by the time you get down to Jericho, fifteen or twenty minutes later, you’re about 2200 feet below sea level. That’s a dangerous road. In the days of Jesus it came to be known as the “Bloody Pass.”

And you know, it’s possible that the priest and the Levite looked over that man on the ground and wondered if the robbers were still around. Or it’s possible that they felt that the man on the ground was merely faking. And he was acting like he had been robbed and hurt, in order to seize them over there, lure them there for quick and easy seizure. And so the first question that the priest asked — the first question that the Levite asked was, “If I stop to help this man, what will happen to me?” But then the Good Samaritan came by. And he reversed the question: “If I do not stop to help this man, what will happen to him?”

*see Luke 10

That’s the question before you tonight. Not, “If I stop to help the sanitation workers, what will happen to my job. Not, “If I stop to help the sanitation workers what will happen to all of the hours that I usually spend in my office every day and every week as a pastor?” The question is not, “If I stop to help this man in need, what will happen to me?” The question is, “If I do not stop to help the sanitation workers, what will happen to them?” That’s the question.

Let us rise up tonight with a greater readiness. Let us stand with a greater determination. And let us move on in these powerful days, these days of challenge to make America what it ought to be. We have an opportunity to make America a better nation. And I want to thank God, once more, for allowing me to be here with you. You know, several years ago, I was in New York City autographing the first book that I had written. And while sitting there autographing books, a demented black woman came up.

The only question I heard from her was, “Are you Martin Luther King?” And I was looking down writing, and I said, “Yes.” And the next minute I felt something beating on my chest. Before I knew it I had been stabbed by this demented woman. I was rushed to Harlem Hospital. It was a dark Saturday afternoon. And that blade had gone through, and the X-rays revealed that the tip of the blade was on the edge of my aorta, the main artery. And once that’s punctured, your drowned in your own blood — that’s the end of you.

It came out in the New York Times the next morning, that if I had merely sneezed, I would have died. Well, about four days later, they allowed me, after the operation, after my chest had been opened, and the blade had been taken out, to move around in the wheel chair in the hospital.

They allowed me to read some of the mail that came in, and from all over the states and the world, kind letters came in. I read a few, but one of them I will never forget. I had received one from the President and the Vice-President. I’ve forgotten what those telegrams said. I’d received a visit and a letter from the Governor of New York, but I’ve forgotten what that letter said. But there was another letter that came from a little girl, a young girl who was a student at the White Plains High School. And I looked at that letter, and I’ll never forget it. It said simply,

“Dear Dr. King, I am a ninth-grade student at the White Plains High School.”

And she said,

“While it should not matter, I would like to mention that I’m a white girl. I read in the paper of your misfortune, and of your suffering. And I read that if you had sneezed, you would have died. And I’m simply writing you to say that I’m so happy that you didn’t sneeze.”

And I want to say tonight — I want to say tonight that I too am happy that I didn’t sneeze. Because if I had sneezed, I wouldn’t have been around here in 1960, when students all over the South started sitting-in at lunch counters. And I knew that as they were sitting in, they were really standing up for the best in the American dream, and taking the whole nation back to those great wells of democracy which were dug deep by the Founding Fathers in the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution.

If I had sneezed, I wouldn’t have been around here in 1961, when we decided to take a ride for freedom and ended segregation in inter-state travel.

If I had sneezed, I wouldn’t have been around here in 1962, when Negroes in Albany, Georgia, decided to straighten their backs up. And whenever men and women straighten their backs up, they are going somewhere, because a man can’t ride your back unless it is bent.

If I had sneezed — If I had sneezed I wouldn’t have been here in 1963, when the black people of Birmingham, Alabama, aroused the conscience of this nation, and brought into being the Civil Rights Bill.

If I had sneezed, I wouldn’t have had a chance later that year, in August, to try to tell America about a dream that I had had.

If I had sneezed, I wouldn’t have been down in Selma, Alabama, to see the great Movement there.

If I had sneezed, I wouldn’t have been in Memphis to see a community rally around those brothers and sisters who are suffering.

I’m so happy that I didn’t sneeze.

And they were telling me –. Now, it doesn’t matter, now. It really doesn’t matter what happens now. I left Atlanta this morning, and as we got started on the plane, there were six of us.

The pilot said over the public address system, “We are sorry for the delay, but we have Dr. Martin Luther King on the plane. And to be sure that all of the bags were checked, and to be sure that nothing would be wrong with on the plane, we had to check out everything carefully. And we’ve had the plane protected and guarded all night.”

And then I got into Memphis. And some began to say the threats, or talk about the threats that were out. What would happen to me from some of our sick white brothers?

Well, I don’t know what will happen now. We’ve got some difficult days ahead. But it really doesn’t matter with me now, because I’ve been to the mountaintop. And I don’t mind.

Like anybody, I would like to live a long life. Longevity has its place. But I’m not concerned about that now. I just want to do God’s will. And He’s allowed me to go up to the mountain. And I’ve looked over. And I’ve seen the Promised Land. I may not get there with you. But I want you to know tonight, that we, as a people, will get to the promised land!

And so I’m happy, tonight.

I’m not worried about anything.

I’m not fearing any man.

Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord.

Tribute

-Music

“We Shall Overcome” (“trying” to ) Play by Piano (October 28th 2010) , from youtube.com

Learned anything new? What else do you know that wasn’t mentioned about MLK Jr.? What are some ways “we” can keep his dream alive?

Good News Sociology
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Movie: Star Wars Series Reflections

As a tribute to the Star Wars (Disney made) new series in 2015, I made this music video…

Music: “Star Wars” movie theme (whistling) creativemusicartsy.wordpress.com

Series

ORIGINAL TRILOGY

Star Wars Movies | StarWars.com
There is a correct order to show your children the Star Wars movies October 24, 2014 theweek.com
“…Let’s say you grew up watching the Star Wars trilogy, then had children sometime after 1999, when George Lucas started releasing the prequels.

When your kids are old enough, what order should they watch the films in? The order they were released — Star Wars (A New Hope) (1977), The Empire Strikes Back (1980), and Return of the Jedi (1983), then The Phantom Menace (1999), Attack of the Clones (2002), and Revenge of the Sith (2005)? Or the order the events happened in the Star Wars universe: Phantom Menace (I), Attack of the Clones (II), Revenge of the Sith (III), New Hope (IV), Empire Strikes Back (V), and Return of the Jedi (VI)?

Rod Hilton, a computer programmer in Colorado, has given this a lot of thought, and he probably has the best solution. His (correct) instinct is to start with New Hope (IV), because if you start with Phantom Menace (I) you lose the essential shock of learning Luke’s parentage in Empire Strikes Back. But he also wants to end on a high note — so, none of the prequels. Here’s Hilton’s “Machete Order,” named after his blog, Absolutely No Machete Juggling:

Next time you want to introduce someone to Star Wars for the first time, watch the films with them in this order: IV, V, II, III, VI…”
Star Wars From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia en.wikipedia.org
“…is an American epic space opera franchise, centered on a film series created by George Lucas. It depicts the adventures of various characters “a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away”.

The franchise began in 1977 with the release of the film Star Wars (subtitled Episode IV: A New Hope in 1981[2][3]),..”

Star Wars: Episode IV – A New Hope (1977) imdb.com
“Luke Skywalker joins forces with a Jedi Knight, a cocky pilot, a wookiee and two droids to save the galaxy from the Empire’s world-destroying battle-station, while also attempting to rescue Princess Leia from the evil Darth Vader. “

Star Wars – Episode IV – Trailer (original 1977)


Star Wars: Episode 4 A New Hope OFFICIAL Blu-Ray trailer from youtube.com

-Cast

=> Spotlight: Celebrity-Carrie Fisher’s “success”! goodnewseverybodycom.wordpress.com

“THE MIKE DOUGLAS SHOW” (1977) (PART 1) (WITH CARRIE FISHER, HARRISON FORD, & MARK HAMILL) from youtube.com
“Published on Aug 31, 2014

Part 1 of 2.

Two months prior to the airing of this episode of “The Mike Douglas Show”, the mega-blockbuster film “Star Wars” debuted in U.S. movie theaters. Host Mike Douglas and co-host Richard Thomas are joined by the three top “Star Wars” cast members — Carrie Fisher, Harrison Ford, and Mark Hamill.

This is a rare chance to see these three “Star Wars” actors in their younger days, prior to the time when “super stardom” enveloped the trio.

This show was taped at Mike Douglas’ Philadelphia studios on July 20, 1977.

©1977 Westinghouse Broadcasting Company, Inc.
©2000 Rhino Home Video

PART 2:

MORE ABOUT THIS SHOW:
http://Mike-Douglas-Show.blogspot.com

ALSO SEE:
http://Classic–Movies.blogspot.com/2…”

RARE 1977 interview with Harrison Ford on Star Wars , from youtube.com
“Uploaded on Oct 18, 2011

May the Force of Nostalgia Be With You NYTimes com Bobbie Wygant interviews Harrison Ford fir Star Wars in 1977.

https://www.facebook.com/ClassicStarWars”

Star Wars: Episode V – The Empire Strikes Back (1980) imdb.com
“..After the rebels have been brutally overpowered by the Empire on their newly established base, Luke Skywalker takes advanced Jedi training with Master Yoda, while his friends are pursued by Darth Vader as part of his plan to capture Luke. ..”
Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back – Trailer

Sal: We need to get “equipped” (see Good News Ministry) and “taught” by mentors (those who have walked the walked) before we personally/individually take on the “enemy”. Season to “train” and season for “active duty” for war…

Yoda training Luke pt1 from youtube.com
Star Wars: Biblical Wisdom from Yoda. | Theology within Film theologywithinfilm.wordpress.com
“..During Luke’s training with Yoda on Dagobah, Luke starts to lose hope when he is distracted by thoughts of his friends. Yoda consistently works Luke toward being able to pull the X-Wing out of the swamp using the Force, but Luke is distracted. ..”
*there is power in the mind to overcome distractions we face in our daily lives!

Star Wars: Episode VI – Return of the Jedi (1983) from imdb.com
“After rescuing Han Solo from the palace of Jabba the Hutt, the rebels attempt to destroy the second Death Star, while Luke struggles to make Vader return from the dark side of the Force. ..”

Star Wars- Return Of The Jedi Trailer (HD)

Sal: The famous fight seen (see Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi – Luke Skywalker vs Darth Vader – Edited , from youtube.com )reminds me of the “spiritual battle” between “good” and “evil” within.

Update: Just watched it again (January 2nd 2016) and got this “relevation”-I was watching the scene where the evil guy tries to make Vader and his son Luke kill each other. He keeps telling Luke to “hate” (“let the hate flow through you…haha!”) and be “angry”. Fortunately, Luke remembers his teaching (mentored by Obi-Wan Kenobi and Yoda) to fight with “love“!

Spoiler Alert: Luke wins his dad’s heart through love and forgiveness..

5 Christian Messages Found in Star Wars crosswalk.com
It’s Never Too Late for Redemption

“At the very end of The Return of the Jedi, just when it seems that all hope is lost, something incredible happens. Darth Vader, the longstanding antagonist of the series, sacrifices himself to save his son and defeat the emperor. Vader had believed he was too far gone to ever find redemption. He had done so many terrible things, betrayed so many people. How could he ever be forgiven?

Luke, on the other hand (no pun intended), never lost faith in Vader. In fact, he believed so strongly he was willing to pay the ultimate price for his forgiveness. There are many people like Vadar who look back on their mistakes and think it’s too late, but they are wrong. I doesn’t matter how far we’ve strayed or how mangled we’ve become, Jesus gave his life so that we could be forgiven (John 3:16). God doesn’t need to save you, He already has…”
*see Luke 17

-Behind the Scenes of Original Trilogy

Behind the Scenes of Star Wars: The Original Trilogy ILM Special Effects Makers. , from youtube.com
“Published on Jan 3, 2016

To YOUTUBE and All of its Viewers,

THIS VIDEO HAD NO INTENTION OF MAKING ANY PROFITS. All of the material belongs to their respective owners.

This was taken from the Star Wars: The Complete Saga as a special feature for the Original Trilogy of Star Wars.

You can purchase the Complete Saga on Amazon here in the link below:

goo.gl/B7j7Ho”

PREQUEL TRILOGY

Star Wars: Episode I – The Phantom Menace (1999) from imdb.com
“Two Jedi Knights escape a hostile blockade to find allies and come across a young boy who may bring balance to the Force, but the long dormant Sith resurface to reclaim their old glory. ..”

Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace – Trailer

Star Wars: The Phantom Menace christiananswers.net
“…On the flip side, there is also a “dark side” which is easier to tap into because anger, fear, and aggression all lead to it. Only by staying calm, patient and passive can one avoid turning to the dark side. Obviously we need to teach our kids what the Bible has to say about all of this. We need to teach them that there is a real force and His name is Jesus Christ and in fact all things were created by Him (John 1:3; John 1:10) and through Him all things truly consist (Colossians 1:17)! Furthermore, they need to know that sin, which we have all committed, (Romans 3:23) leads to the “dark side” and we must accept Christ as Lord of ours lives to get us into heaven (Romans 6:23)…”

Star Wars: Episode II – Attack of the Clones (2002) .imdb.com
“Ten years after initially meeting, Anakin Skywalker shares a forbidden romance with Padmé, while Obi-Wan investigates an assassination attempt on the Senator and discovers a secret clone army crafted for the Jedi. ..”

Star Wars Episode II: Attack of the Clones – Trailer



Star Wars: Episode II—Attack of the Clones
compiled by Jeffrey Overstreet Copyright Christianity Today International 2002 1 Jan crosswalk.com
“.. In this chapter, young Anakin Skywalker starts giving in to his foolish impulses, rejects the counsel of his teachers, and responds to the temptations that lead him on the path of the Dark Side. His primary weakness is his infatuation with the beautiful Senator Padme Amidala…”

Sal: What temptations do you have?

-Comedy

Star Wars: Episode II – Attack of the Clones (2002) Bloopers Gag Reel , from youtube.com

Star Wars: Episode III – Revenge of the Sith (2005) imdb.com
“..During the near end of the clone wars, Darth Sidious has revealed himself and is ready to execute the last part of his plan to rule the Galaxy. Sidious is ready for his new apprentice, Lord… See full summary » ..”

Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith – Trailer

-Cool

Episode III Lightsaber Training , from youtube.com

Star Wars Ep 3 Revenge of the Sith Final Battle Clip , from youtube.com
“You turned her against me..”.-Anakin & “.. You’ve done that yourself…Your anger and lust for power have already done that..”-Obi Wan
Episode III The Final Battle – Darth Vader Vs Obi-Wan Kenobi – Part 1 , from youtube.com
*see satan (a.k.a. father of lies), deceiver, etc..

SEQUEL TRILOGY

Sal: I watched this movie again (via online) after watching Rogue 1 the other day (Friday, December 16th 2016). I was encouraged and had a revelation during the scenes (e.g. Star Wars VII The Force Awakens- Rey vs Kylo Ren Lightsaber Fight Scene from youtube.com , of “using the force” (see 1 Corinthians 12).

Star Wars: The Force Awakens (2015) from imdb.com
“..Three decades after the defeat of the Galactic Empire, a new threat arises. The First Order attempts to rule the galaxy and only a ragtag group of heroes can stop them, along with the help of the Resistance. ..”
Star Wars: The Force Awakens Trailer (Official)

Sal: Another revelation or thought was during the scene when Rey “commands” the Star Trooper to release her and drop his weapon..lol! I saw this as believers needing to practice using their authority as God’s children against the evil and dark forces…in Jesus’ name!

-Cast

Star Wars: The Force Awakens (2015) Full Cast & Crew imdb.com
Carrie Fisher Interview with Gary on The Force Awakens , from youtube.com
“Published on Dec 4, 2015

Carrie Fisher played Princess Leia in the first “Star Wars” in 1977 and returns this month in “Star Wars: The Force Awakens.” | Carrie Fisher, who will forever be known for playing Princess Leia Organa in the original “Star Wars” trilogy, has died, family spokesman Simon Halls has confirmed to ABC News…”
Billie Lourd On How She Got A ‘Star Wars’ Role Without Help From Mom Carrie Fisher | TODAY , from youtube.com

-Comedy

Star Wars Undercover Boss: Starkiller Base – SNL, from youtube.com

Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (2016), from imdb.com
Rogue One: A Star Wars Story starwars.com
“From Lucasfilm comes the first of the Star Wars standalone films, “Rogue One: A Star Wars Story,” an all-new epic adventure. In a time of conflict, a group of unlikely heroes band together on a mission to steal the plans to the Death Star, the Empire’s ultimate weapon of destruction. This key event in the Star Wars timeline brings together ordinary people who choose to do extraordinary things, and in doing so, become part of something greater than themselves. In theaters December 2016.

Rated: PG-13

Released: December 16, 2016

Rogue One: A Star Wars Story Trailer (Official)

Rogue One review: this is the first Star Wars movie to acknowledge the whole franchise is about war Updated by Todd VanDerWerff@tvoti Dec 16, 2016, 11:14am EST vox.com
It’s often incoherent and messy. But it’s also beautiful and has a strong central theme.
“..But if the film is politically relevant, it’s only accidentally so, not intentionally. I say that not just because Rogue One was completed long before Donald Trump’s election or even Brexit, but because Edwards uses a kind of scattershot approach to political content in his films — he’ll give you just enough of an idea of what he’s going for, but he’s uninterested in pushing any further than that.

An early shot in Rogue One features Stormtroopers patrolling the streets of a city rife with tension between various factions, rolling around in a tank. At various moments, it calls to mind the US occupation of Iraq and police militarization of American cities. But it’s not entirely clear whether Edwards has thought about what these similarities might mean in the larger tapestry of Rogue One beyond “Do you get this reference?” It’s political commentary as Family Guy joke…”
*see Neutral Perspective: Iraq War was justified or not?
An Epic Scene in Rogue One Will Change How You See Darth Vader Megan McCluskey Dec. 16, 2016 time.com
This post contains spoilers for Rogue One.

Others:

-Animated

Star Wars Animated Series | StarWars.com from starwars.com

-Bible

9 Ways Star Wars Parallels the Bible by Paul Kent onfaith.co
The Death Star and pride? Luke Skywalker and Moses? Star Wars mirrors Scripture more than you think.
“..His life goal is to spur interest in the Bible for readers of all ages and backgrounds. Paul has loved the Star Wars saga since he saw the original movie poster at age 11. He is the author of The Real Force: A 40-Day Devotional. We asked him to list 9 ways in which the Star Wars series parallels the Bible..”
Star Wars, Literary Parallels and the Bible April 11, 2013 logosmadeflesh.com
“..Have you noticed how the second Star Wars trilogy (episodes I-III) parallels the first (episodes IV-VI)? Here are a few examples..”

-Behind the Scenes

‘Star Wars’ locations that actually exist
By Griffin Shea, for CNN Updated 11:00 AM ET, Wed December 21, 2016 cnn.com

-Theories

10 Star Wars Fan Theories That Will Blow Your Mind , from youtube.com
“Description:
Did Han Solo really survive on dumb luck, or was the Force with him? Why do the Ewoks think C-3PO is their god? Was Luke Skywalker standing next to a grave at the end of The Force Awakens? Star Wars fans have burning questions. Sometimes, they also have the answers. This video is a review of our favorite mind-blowing Star Wars fan theories, the ones that change the whole picture of what’s going on in the movies.”

-Weapons

Star Wars Featurette: The Birth of the Lightsaber , from youtube.com
“Published on Apr 9, 2014

Star Wars creator George Lucas, actor Mark Hamill, and sound designer Ben Burtt discuss the concept and creation of the lightsaber.”

What’s your favorite Star Wars movie/series?

Good News Movie
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