Deep Thought: A Day Without Hispanics ?

A Day Without a Mexican – Trailer – YouTube

Demographics


Hispanic Heritage Month 2018 SEPTEMBER 13, 2018
RELEASE NUMBER CB18-FF.07 census.gov
“..In 1989, Congress expanded the observance to a month long celebration (Sept. 15-Oct. 15) of the culture and traditions of those who trace their roots to Spain, Mexico and the Spanish-speaking nations of Central America, South America and the Caribbean…

Did You Know?
58.9 million
The Hispanic population of the United States as of July 1, 2017, making people of Hispanic origin the nation’s largest ethnic or racial minority. Hispanics constituted 18.1 percent of the nation’s total population….”

The 10 MOST HISPANIC STATES in AMERICA

Nick Johnson
Published on Mar 14, 2019
In order to rank the most hispanic states in America, we had to look at which US state populations have the highest number of hispanic (or latino) residents, as a percentage of the state’s total population.

History

How Latino Americans Shaped the U.S., Fought for Acceptance

PBS NewsHour
Published on Sep 13, 2013

From Spanish settlers to immigration reform, the Hispanic-American experience stretches centuries and predates Plymouth Rock. A new PBS documentary series chronicles those often untold stories. Gwen Ifill talks to NewsHour’s own Ray Suarez about his companion book, “Latino Americans: The 500-Year Legacy that Shaped a Nation.”

Latino Contributions To U.S. History huffpost.com
“..Bernardo de Gálvez, the Spanish governor of Louisiana in 1777, played a key role in General George Washington’s battles against British soldiers….

Helped Win Texan Independence
It wasn’t only Anglos at the Alamo when the Mexican army arrived — there were a handful of Tejanos as well. In fact, Anglo immigration into the territory was largely engineered by Tejanos who favored independence and commerce with the United States. Tejano leaders like José Antonio Navarro and Francisco Ruiz joined the independence movement and later served as lawmakers.

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Helped desegregate schools
Before Brown v. Board of Education, there was Mendez v. Westminster. In the landmark case, a judge decided in 1946 that California could not segregate its school system based on national origin or language ability….

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Gave us a bunch of words
New Yorkers call their corner stores “bodegas,” cowboys get together at “rodeos” and yuppies drive “mustangs.” Spanish is so ever-present in the United States that Americans often speak the language without even knowing it.

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Fought in World War II
Somewhere between 250,000 and 500,000 Latinos fought the Axis powers in World War II. Because military records didn’t track ethnicity and generally counted Latinos as white, researchers have trouble pinpointing the figure…

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Helped revitalize the housing market
Immigrants — of whom people from Latin America are the great majority — boosted the housing market by a whopping $3.7 trillion from 2000 to 2010, according to a study by the Americas Society…

Hispanic American Contributions to American Culture – YouTube

Studies Weekly
Published on Aug 11, 2016
The United States is known as the Great Melting Pot and Hispanic Americans have always been an essential ingredient to our great nation. This video highlights some of their great accomplishments.

Learn all about science and history with Studies Weekly at http://www.studiesweekly.com!

Agriculture

KVIE’s Los Braceros: Strong Arms to Aid the U.S.A.

The Bracero Program Explained – YouTube

Ben Clark
Published on Jan 21, 2016
This documentary was a finalist at the National History Day state competition in California. The theme for this year was “Rights and Responsibilities in History.” Created by Ben Clark, Elijah Gross-Sable, and Drew Schmid

The Bracero Program: Migrant Workers in America Documentary Part 2 (1959)

Xicana Corner
Published on Nov 28, 2010
In the 1930s, during the Great Depression, over 500,000 Mexican Americans were deported or pressured to leave, during the Mexican Repatriation. There were thus fewer Mexican Americans available when labor demand returned with World War II.

When The U.S. Government Tried To Replace Migrant Farmworkers With High Schoolers August 23, 201810:41 AM ET GUSTAVO ARELLANO npr.org
“…The year was 1965. On Cinco de Mayo, newspapers across the country reported that Secretary of Labor W. Willard Wirtz wanted to recruit 20,000 high schoolers to replace the hundreds of thousands of Mexican agricultural workers who had labored in the United States under the so-called Bracero Program. Started in World War II, the program was an agreement between the American and Mexican governments that brought Mexican men to pick harvests across the U.S. It ended in 1964, after years of accusations by civil rights activists like Cesar Chavez that migrants suffered wage theft and terrible working and living conditions.

..

But farmers complained — in words that echo today’s headlines — that Mexican laborers did the jobs that Americans didn’t want to do, and that the end of the Bracero Program meant that crops would rot in the fields.

“They can do the work,” Wirtz said at a press conference in Washington, D.C., announcing the creation of the project, called A-TEAM — Athletes in Temporary Employment as Agricultural Manpower. “They are entitled to a chance at it.” Standing beside him to lend gravitas were future Baseball Hall of Famers Stan Musial and Warren Spahn and future Pro Football Hall of Famer Jim Brown.

Despite such skepticism, Wirtz’s scheme seemed to work at first: About 18,100 teenagers signed up to join the A-TEAM. But only about 3,300 of them ever got to pick crops.

Problems arose immediately for the A-TEAM nationwide. In California’s Salinas Valley, 200 teenagers from New Mexico, Kansas and Wyoming quit after just two weeks on the job. “We worked three days and all of us are broke,” the Associated Press quoted one teen as saying. Students elsewhere staged strikes. At the end, the A-TEAM was considered a giant failure and was never tried again.

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But he says the experience also taught them empathy toward immigrant workers that Carter says the rest of the country should learn, especially during these times.

“There’s nothing you can say to us that [migrant laborers] are rapists or they’re lazy,” he says. “We know the work they do. And they do it all their lives, not just one summer for a couple of months. And they raise their families on it. Anyone ever talks bad on them, I always think, ‘Keep talking, buddy, because I know what the real deal is.’ ”

Education

Sciences


Mario Molina
sciencehistory.org
As a postdoctoral researcher, Molina proposed that CFCs had the potential to destroy the earth’s protective ozone layer. He eventually received a Nobel Prize for his discovery.
“..Mario Molina (b. 1943) was the first to realize that chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) could destroy ozone. In the two decades following his discovery, he and his mentor became voices alerting the world to the danger of CFCs and ozone depletion. Their warnings often fell on deaf ears. Once confirmed, however, their findings earned them a Nobel Prize…

Early Life

Molina was born in Mexico City, where his father was a successful lawyer and a diplomat. As a child Molina was fascinated with chemistry and converted one of the family bathrooms to a chemistry laboratory for himself. His aunt, Esther Molina, was a chemist, and she encouraged and mentored the boy by helping him carry out more advanced experiments than normally possible with a child’s chemistry set. Recognizing his passion for science, Molina’s parents sent him to a boarding school in Europe, where they thought his interests would be nurtured…

By 2009 all nations in the United Nations had ratified the original protocol. In 1996 Molina and Rowland were awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry, along with Swedish scientist Paul Crutzen, for the work they had done in helping unravel the mysteries and dangers of CFCs…

Misc

Facts About Hispanics in the United States: Hispanic Heritage Month

Speaking Latino
Published on Sep 9, 2013

Famous Hispanic Americans – YouTube

Hispanic Culture in USA – YouTube

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