Life Challenge: Cost of being on the “Celebrity Spotlight”?

Musician

Tulisa: The Price of Fame


“..Published on Jul 29, 2014

Documentary which follows the last 12 months in the singer Tulisa Contostavlos’s life. Combining self-shot diary footage with actuality the programme shows what’s it’s really like to be on the receiving end of a tabloid sting and its consequences. The film charts Tulisa’s highs and her lows, her arrest, her charge, state of mind and suicide attempt and her treatment at the hands of the tabloid press as she travels to the brink of disaster before her case collapses and she regains her life and her reputation.

Hard-hitting and harrowing, the film lifts the lid on this episode in the singer’s life and in doing so tells us about the nature of celebrity culture and how it feels to be a major celebrity facing public ruin…”

Update:

Fake Sheikh’ Mazher Mahmood guilty over Tulisa case 5 October 2016 From the section UK bbc.com
“The reporter, 53, was found to have altered evidence in the collapsed drugs trial of singer Tulisa Contostavlos.

His driver, Alan Smith, 67, was also found guilty of the same charge following a trial at the Old Bailey.

Lawyers say 18 other people targeted by Mahmood now plan to bring civil claims against him, which could total £800m.

Some of the individuals were convicted of crimes which, they argued at the time, came as the result of false evidence…”

Celebrities

Johnny Depp On The Cost Of Fame (HD)

Michael Jackson and the ‘extreme’ price of fame updated 8:44 a.m. EDT, Mon June 29, 2009 cnn.com
“..”The public at large has yet to really understand the pressures of childhood celebrity, which, while exciting, always exacts a very heavy price,” Jackson wrote in 2000 in a column for the religious Web site beliefnet. “More than anything, I wished to be a normal little boy. I wanted to build tree houses and go to roller-skating parties. But very early on, this became impossible.”..

“The problem with that is he never really had a personal life. He never had a chance to live.”

For Jackson, the pressures of celebrity “exaggerated and exacerbated” what likely already were some deep emotional and mental wounds, according to Wanis…


Michael Jackson had girlfriends, wanted a normal life, bodyguards claim
Vicki Hyman | NJ Advance Media for NJ.com By Vicki Hyman | NJ Advance Media for NJ.com on March 09, 2010 at 9:40 AM, updated March 09, 2010 at 10:04 AM

Michael Jackson – Price Of Fame (lyrics) 1080p


“..Published on Sep 22, 2012

New Song From Bad 25..”

Brooke Shields: Her Controversial Secrets Revealed 90skidsonly.com
“..In 2012, Brooke went through the most heartbreaking thing she had ever faced – the death of her mother. Brooke’s mom was one of her biggest inspirations, both in her career and personal life. Brooke regretted that her and her late mother never got the chance to talk through their obviously troubled relationship. With Brooke posing nude at just 8-years old and being a teenager when working for Playboy, her childhood was quickly stripped of its innocence, something she felt guilty about when it came to her mom…”

Bible Verses about being Quiet biblestudytools.com

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Spotlight: Who was Michael Jackson (“king of pop music”)?

New MJ Documentary: March, 2017 (Man in the Mirror) with Earnest Valentino


“..Published on Apr 3, 2017

Earnest Valentino makes several appearances as the adult Michael Jackson throughout the Documentary which shows the pain, and suffering Michael Jackson endured while being used, abused, and accused from those he thought were his friends.

This was very difficult for me, and challenging to say the least….”

-Early Life Battles



‘…When the Jackson 5 reached national fame with Motown, Michael was only 11 years old. In short time he and his brothers were touring around the country to audiences that including thousands of adoring female fans. During these road trips, Michael witnessed sexual liaisons between his brothers and female groupies – they often had sex in the same room where he slept. Sometimes his father would sleep with the young women who showed up after performances eager for a connection with the famous family. Joseph warned his sons not to tell their mother about his secret and no matter how much Michael may have wanted to expose his father, for a Jehovah’s Witness, a father’s word is gospel. A key scripture repeated over and over again is the one admonishing children to honor their father and mother in all things. If a child questions their parent, or fails to submit to their direction, it is viewed as a sin against God, so it creates an atmosphere where its seems best to stay quiet and say nothing. Michael expressed disgust by his father’s behavior and betrayal of his mother but said nothing to her about it – he was torn. Disobey his father and God, or lie to his mother – it was an difficult choice he preferred not to make…”

“..Things came to a head over the Thriller video. Michael came up with the concept for the Thriller video after watching the horror-fantasy film An American Werewolf in London. He hired its director, John Landis to direct the 14 min video which included special effects combining illusion with reality. In the video Michael is transformed into a monster who dances with a troupe of ghouls newly emerged from their graves. It was a unique and revolutionary concept and approach to music videos that would transform MTV and the music business generally, but to church elders it was viewed as advocating Satanism and the occult. When they confronted him about it – Michael initially refused to repudiate his work. However, when he was threatened with disfellowshipping – spiritual death – if he failed to comply, Michael became very upset. He called his lawyer – John Branca – and ordered him to destroy the master tapes of the video, which had cost more than one million dollars to produce. After days of back and forth, with Michael repeatedly asserting the tapes had to be destroyed – his lawyer came up with a compromise. He suggested that Michael could place a disclaimer at the beginning of the video stating that it did not reflect Michael’s personal or religious convictions. Michael thought this was a great idea and agreed to do so. The disclaimer, [“Due to my strong personal convictions , I wish to stress that this film in no way endorses a belief in the occult-Michael Jackson“] viewed by millions of people who watched Thriller on MTV – got Michael a reprieve from the church – at least in the short run. However, the issues surrounding the Thriller video was not the only problem Michael faced with church elders…”

‘…Michael: Right, I’m trying to imitate Jesus in the fact that he said to be like children, to love children, to be as pure as children and to make yourself as innocent and to see the world through eyes of wonderment and the whole magical quality of it all – and I love that. And we’ll have like a hundred bald headed children, they all have cancer and they’re all running around…..”

-Criminal Charges

Michael Jackson child abuse case: New shock revelations from his lawyer and manager By Stefan Kyriazis
PUBLISHED: 12:08, Wed, Jun 22, 2016 | UPDATED: 13:22, Wed, Jun 22, 2016 express.co.uk
“..Michael Jackson’s daughter, Paris, has defended her father against allegations of child pornography, and a new book, Making Michael by Mike Smallcombe, features testimony from over 60 of Michael Jacksons’ colleagues, staff and friends.

It reveals that Micahel may have been drugged by his own investigator to get him out of the country before police could arrest him in 1993.

It also reveals that Michael himself did not want to settle the subsequent court case with Chandler’s family, but Elizabeth Taylor persuaded him to do so.

Plus, Michael’s own lawyer says whether he personally believed the star was guilty of any sexual acts with the young boys he invited to Neverland…

“’I thought that paying a substantial amount of money would forever tarnish his reputation, and injure him professionally. But he was listening to Elizabeth Taylor, and I suspect that she had the attitude where she told him, ‘Michael you’ve got all the money in the world, why do you need a trial?’

“‘He had a very good lawyer in Johnnie Cochran, who was convinced he would have won an acquittal. It’s very tough to lose a case in which you are innocent.””

Jordy Chandler disappears: Boy now aged 36 who sparked Michael Jackson’s pedophile scandal in 1993 cannot be found for deposition in a separate sex abuse case By Dailymail.com Reporters Published: 21:32 EDT, 6 November 2016 | Updated: 03:20 EDT, 7 November 2016
“…Finaldi said Robson wasn’t the only child Jackson, Staikos and his companies lured to Neverland Ranch.

‘(Staikos) would call parents and say, “Hey, he wants to meet you, come down to the ranch,’ Finaldi told the New York Daily News.

Finaldi said the family’s plane tickets and food would be paid for. They would arrive to the ranch in a limousine, and be given gifts from the staff.

‘Make no mistake, Neverland Ranch was nothing but a well-orchestrated trap,’ he told the New York Daily News.

‘It was custom-built to attract kids so he could groom them and decide which to sexually abuse.’

Jackson’s estate called Robson’s allegations ‘less than credible’, but the choreographer said he would never make such public claims for money.

‘The idea that I would make all of this up and put myself, my wife, my son, my entire family through this extremely stressful and painful experience all for money is incomprehensible,’ he said.

‘I’ve lived in silence and denial for 22 years and I can’t spend another moment in that.’
..”

Michael Jackson: The Footage You Were Never Meant To See…

Family

Michael Jackson Rare Funny Moments. Don’t Mess With Michael!


“Published on Oct 16, 2016

Compilation of Rare funny Michael Jackson moments, Also moments Michael Jackson caught acting like a Boss. Don’t mess with Michael Jackson. Rare Clips.

Michael Jackson Private Home Movies HD 720P

-Parents

60 Minutes | Katherine Jackson Interview | A Mother’s Pain [FULL] 1/09/2013

Music

Michael Jackson | Album Discography | AllMusic allmusic.com
Michael Jackson Discography at Discogs discogs.com

Michael Jackson ‎– HIStory – Past, Present And Future – Book I discogs.com

Michael Jackson – HIStory [Disc 1] (Album)

Michael Jackson – You Are Not Alone (Official Video) – YouTube

Music: Karaoke-“You Are Not Alone” (originally from Michael Jackson) by “Crazy Lil Sal” creativemusicartsy.wordpress.com

Music: Karaoke-“Man in the Mirror” by (MJ) Crazy lil’ Sal creativemusicartsy.wordpress.com

Concerts

michael jackson – billie jean live first time moonwalk

Michael Jackson – Smooth Criminal – Live in Munich 1997


“Published on Nov 6, 2014

Michael Jackson – Smooth Criminal – HIStory World Tour Live in Munich 1997
♥♥♥MICHAEL JACKSON♥♥♥”

Michael Jackson – You Are Not Alone – Live Munich 1997 – Widescreen HD

Michael Jackson – They Don’t Care About Us – Live Munich 1997- Widescreen HD

Best of Michael Jackson STAGE FAILS!

Impersonators

Pete Carter as Michael Jackson : Tribute Artist/Impersonator/Look-Alike


“Published on Mar 19, 2013

Pete Carter is a Michael Jackson Tribute Artist based in NJ/NY/PA area.”

Heal the World-“Make it a Better Place”

King of Pop: Michael Jackson-How are you going to help “heal the world…and make it a better place? goodnewseverybodycom.wordpress.com

Any favorite links, footage, etc.. that you would like to be included here..

Good News Music
https://www.facebook.com/groups/505306376183725/

Spotlight: Celebrity-“Prince” Rogers Nelson Tribute

BIO

Prince Biography.com
Music Producer, Songwriter, Musician, Singer(1958–2016)
biography.com
“..Religious Faith

During the same year as his wedding to Testolini, Prince also became a Jehovah’s Witness, embracing the faith after years of study though he was raised as a Seventh-Day Adventist. His mentor as a Witness was bassist Larry Graham, who had played with Sly & the Family Stone and thus was also a major musical influence.

Prince was believed to have taken part in what’s referred to as field service for his faith, having once visited a Jewish couple in Eden Prairie, Minnesota and leaving behind a copy of the Witness publication The Watchtower. His language and performance sensibilities changed somewhat, with some fans questioning how some of the conservative aspects of his religion jibed with the explicit nature of past songs. Contradicting the rock/soul persona, others have pointed out that Prince has historically had songs that were clearly Christian in nature, as seen with “The Ladder,” “The Holy River,” “The Cross” and “God,” the gospel B-side to the single “Purple Rain.” ..”
Prince
Biography

“..Prince Rogers Nelson was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota, to Mattie Shaw, a jazz singer and social worker, and John L. Nelson, a lyricist and pianist. His father’s stage name was “Prince Rogers”. His parents were both from African-American families from Louisiana. They separated during his youth, which lead him to move back and forth. Prince had a troubled relationship with his step-father which lead him to run away from home. Prince was adopted by a family called the Andersons. Prince soon after became friends with the Anderson’s son, Andre Anderson (Cymone) together along with Charles Smith they joined a band called Grand Central. The band later renamed themselves Champagne and were a fairly successful live band, however soon diminished…”

PRINCE THE MAN BEHIND THE MUSIC ~ FULL DOCUMENTARY 2016
“Published on May 8, 2016

New upload 2016. Do we really know the man behind the music?This Documentary film, explores how Prince – showman, artist, enigma – revolutionised the perception of black music in the 1980s with worldwide hits such as 1999, Kiss, Raspberry Beret and Alphabet Street. He became a global sensation with the release of the Oscar-winning, semi-autobiographical movie Purple Rain in 1984, embarking on an incredible journey of musical self-discovery that continued right up to his passing in April 2016, aged 57.

This documentary primarily focuses on Prince’s creative and commercial output during the 1980’s, with anecdotes provided by several of the key collaborators of the era, some great insight is provided into the inner workings of the 1980’s Purple Reign.

Packed with live performance and studio footage, rare photographs and new interviews with friends, confidants, fellow musicians and other people close to Prince, the program sheds light on one of the industry’s most innovative and influential artists.

From the psychedelic Around the World in a Day to his masterpiece album Sign O’ the Times and experiments with hip-hop and jazz, Prince was one of most ambitious and prolific songwriters of his generation. He tested the boundaries of taste and decency with explicit sexual lyrics and stage shows during his early career and in the 1990s fought for ownership of his name and control of his music, played out in a public battle with his former label, Warner. Highly regarded as one of the most flamboyant live performers ever, Prince was a controversial and famously elusive creative force.

THE TRUTH IS OUT THERE.

THANK YOU FOR CHECKING US OUT. STOP BY ANYTIME!

Let US know what is on YOUR MIND.

FEEL FREE TO SUBSCRIBE and (SHARE) our Videos.
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LIKE US ON FACEBOOK
https://www.facebook.com/theRAWweb.”

Sal: I had a chance to attend a concert at First Avenue during my early college years. I don’t remember the band that was performing, but it was a cool weekend late night hangout with some college friends.

ABOUT | First Avenue first-avenue.com

“MUSICIANS

We’re proud to foster relationships with artists and musicians at all stages in their careers, whether it’s playing their first show at the 7th St Entry, selling out multiple nights in the Mainroom, or shooting one of the greatest music films of all time in our room (Purple Rain, if you couldn’t guess).

By presenting local acts almost every night of the week at the 7th St Entry, First Avenue has been the launching pad for local bands like Atmosphere, Hüsker Dü, the Replacements, Semisonic, Soul Asylum and more.

First Avenue has additionally been a stepping stone for national musicians including Joe Cocker, U2, Eminem, Tina Turner, Black Flag, The Ramones, Depeche Mode, Bo Diddley, Lucinda Williams, Metallica and, of course, Prince. Working with bands like these, First Avenue strives to support the best that live music has to offer…”

The first time PRINCE ever played PURPLE RAIN caught on this extremely rare video will give you ALL THE PRINCE FEELS! news.iheart.com
“This Facebook user posted this extremely rare video footage of the first time PRINCE performed his career-defining epic PURPLE RAIN in 1983 at First Avenue Minneapolis.

The video, which will bring any PRINCE fan all sorts of feels, contains some amazing commentary about the song, the recording process, and little tidbits which tell the ‘story behind the song’ which really is the defining work of an artist whom was called home too soon.

It’s got over FOUR MILLION views. Feel free to add a few more.

Read more: http://news.iheart.com/onair/toby-knapp-41816/the-first-time-prince-ever-played-14636207/#ixzz4f69yTaTf
..”

Prince Memorial Aerial Drone footage Paisley Park, First Avenue Club, Lake Minnetonka, Purple Rain


“Published on Aug 22, 2016

Aerial drone footage of Prince’s home, Paisley Park. Drone footage of First Avenue Club in Minneapolis. Paisley Park is a gathering place for mourners of Prince. Drone footage shows Paisley Park and includes history, stats and points of interest. Drone footage of First Avenue Club shows the relationship between Prince, Purple Rain and the historic music venue.

Aerial drone footage filmed with a DJI Phantom 4.”

Music

Prince | Album Discography | AllMusic allmusic.com
Prince Albums princevault.com

Prince And The Revolution ‎– Purple Rain discogs.com

Prince ~ Purple Rain Live ~ American Music Awards 1985 ~ HQ

When Doves Cry by Prince songfacts.com
“.. Prince wrote this song for his movie Purple Rain. In the film, the song plays under a montage after his character loses his girl (Apollonia) to his rival (Morris – Morris Day of The Time). We see Prince riding his motorcycle along with shots of intimate moments with Apollonia. In the movie, Prince has a difficult relationship with his father, who beats his mom. Scenes of his father come in on the lyrics where Prince calls him “demanding.”

The film is semi-autobiographical, but how much is based on real life remains a mystery, as Prince rarely gave interviews and didn’t talk about his personal life. In the movie, the song expresses his fear of becoming like his parents. When the doves cry, that’s his musical refuge – the barrage of keyboards in the chorus represents the doves crying…”
Prince and The Revolution – When Doves Cry

Prince and The Revolution – When Doves Cry from Matze on Vimeo.

MISC


10 Surprising Facts About Prince
mentalfloss.com
“…2. HE WAS A JEHOVAH’S WITNESS.

Baptized in 2001, Prince was a devout Jehovah’s Witness; he even went door-to-door. In October 2003, a woman in Eden Prairie, Minnesota opened her door to discover the famously shy artist and his bassist, former Sly and the Family Stone member Larry Graham, standing in front of her home. “My first thought is ‘Cool, cool, cool. He wants to use my house for a set. I’m glad! Demolish the whole thing! Start over!,'” the woman told The Star Tribune. “Then they start in on this Jehovah’s Witnesses stuff. I said, ‘You know what? You’ve walked into a Jewish household, and this is not something I’m interested in.’ He says, ‘Can I just finish?’ Then the other guy, Larry Graham, gets out his little Bible and starts reading scriptures about being Jewish and the land of Israel.”..”

Death

Prince: how did he die and what happened to his money? The big questions, a year after his death By Ben Bryant 21 April 2017 • 5:54pm telegraph.co.uk
How, exactly, did Prince die?
“..
Prince died on April 21, 2016, in a lift in his Paisley Park home in Carver County, Minneapolis, from an overdose of a powerful opioid painkiller.

A one-page autopsy report recorded his death as an accident and said “The decedent self-administered fentanyl”.

Many friends, relatives, and former girlfriends said they never saw him take drugs, although some – including his ex-wife – have said that in hindsight there were warning signs of his addiction.

There may have been other contributing factors that led to his death, but if so they could remain secret for a long time. Under Minnesota law the full autopsy report can be kept secret for up to 30 years unless the next of kin agree to release it. The question of who provided Prince with the drugs remains open, and the investigation is still active, according to Minnesota police.
..”

*see Overcoming your own addictions
Sorry, Prince is not in “a better place.” Certainly not yet. adventistreview.org
Letting God’s word speak in a moment of loss.
“…While it may be a long time before Prince, the musician, is forgotten, the fact is there really is “no further reward” awaiting him, at least not yet. His relationship with God is known best only to God right now, and anything we can say about what awaits Mr. Nelson in the future is mere speculation…”

Health Question: Wasn’t Prince “too” healthy to have died early? goodnewshealthandfitness.wordpress.com

PRINCE: “I don’t believe ANY of the stories that they told me” (about Prince’s death) says cousin


SanfordWatch
“Published on Feb 11, 2017

HLN’s “How it REALLY Happened, with Hill Harper – Prince: The End” (FULL EPISODE). FEATURES: Interviews with Andre’ Cymone, Pepe’ Willie, Owen Husney, Van Jones, Charles Chazz Smith and many more. WHAT REALLY HAPPENED TO PRINCE AND WHY???”

Tributes

Paisley Park

Paisley Park Visit Outside (April 2017)

-Mural

Good News Music
https://www.facebook.com/groups/505306376183725/

Spotlight: Who was Martin Luther King Jr.?

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. drmartinlutherkingjr.com
The Greatest Orator For Peace And Love
“..The ultimate weakness of violence
is that it is a descending spiral,
begetting the very thing it seeks to destroy.
Instead of diminishing evil, it multiplies it.
Through violence you may murder the liar,
but you cannot murder the lie, nor establish the truth.
Through violence you murder the hater,
but you do not murder hate.
In fact, violence merely increases hate….
Returning violence for violence multiples violence,
adding deeper darkness to a night already devoid of stars.
Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that.
Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that.
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr…”

Martin Luther King, Jr. – Mini Bio


“Uploaded on Jan 8, 2010

A short biography of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. He is widely considered the most influential leader of the American civil rights movement. He fought to overturn Jim Crow segregation laws and eliminate social and economic differences between blacks and whites. King’s speeches and famous quotes continue to inspire millions today.

20 Interesting Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Facts todayifoundout.com
“1) His name was originally Michael, not Martin. His father was also Michael King, hence why Martin Luther King Jr. was originally named Michael King Jr. However, after a trip to Germany in 1931, Michael King Sr. changed his own name in homage to historic German theologian Martin Luther. Michael King Jr. was two years old at the time and King Sr. made the decision to change his son’s name to Martin Luther as well….

3) King wasn’t the only one to die at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis on April 4, 1968. After he was killed, one of the hotel workers, Lorraine Bailey (who was also the wife of the motel owner and who it was named after), upon seeing King get shot, had a heart attack and later died from this.

4) Also on the day King was killed, he was out on the balcony for a smoke. While you’ll be hard pressed to find a picture of him smoking, he smoked regularly, though had a habit of hiding this partially due to the stigma, particularly within the church at the time, but also because he didn’t want his kids to take up smoking, and so didn’t like pictures of himself doing it, nor did he like to smoke when they were around. …

7) He almost didn’t become a minister. After graduating from college, he still had serious doubts about Christianity and the Bible and told his father (who was a Baptist minister, as his grandfather had also been) that he didn’t want to be a minister and instead was considering becoming a doctor or a lawyer. He later decided that the Bible had “many profound truths which one cannot escape” and chose to become a minister, entering seminary at Crozer Theological Seminary in Pennsylvania. …

10) King convinced “Uhura” on Star Trek, Nichelle Nichols (who incidentally later went on to work for NASA), to continue on with the role after the first season. Nichols stated he told her not to leave the show because she was not only playing a black person as a main character on TV, but she was also playing a character that didn’t conform to the stereotypical black person of the day, usually portrayed. Rather, Uhura was portrayed as an intelligent member of the crew and an equal to those around her….”

*see Nichelle Nichols imdb.com
“..was born Grace Nichols on December 28, 1932 in Robbins, Illinois. She began her show business career at age 16 as a singer with Duke Ellington in a ballet she created for one of his compositions and later sang with his band. After switching to acting, she was twice nominated for the Sarah Siddons Award for best actress in “The …..”

SPEECHES

The Archive | The Martin Luther King Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social … thekingcenter.org

“..There are nearly a million documents associated with the life of Martin Luther King Jr. These pages will present a more dynamic view than is often seen of Dr. King’s life and times. The documents reveal the scholar, the father, and the pastor. Through these papers we see the United States of America at one of its most vulnerable, most honest and perhaps most human moments in history. There are letters bearing the official marks of royalty and the equally regal compositions of children. You will see speeches, telegrams, scribbled notes, patient admonitions and urgent pleas. This spotlight shows you a glimpse of the remarkable history within this collection…”
The Speeches of Martin Luther King Jr. npr.org
Remembering Key Addresses, Sermons by the Civil Rights Leader
Martin Luther King, Jr. | National Archives archives.gov

“..Martin Luther King, Jr.

On August 28, 1963, Martin Luther King Jr., delivered a speech to a massive group of civil rights marchers gathered around the Lincoln memorial in Washington DC. The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom brought together the nations most prominent civil rights leaders, along with tens of thousands of marchers, to press the United States government for equality. The culmination of this event was the influential and most memorable speech of Dr. King’s career. Popularly known as the “I have a Dream” speech, the words of Martin Luther King, Jr. influenced the Federal government to take more direct actions to more fully realize racial equality.

Mister Maestro, Inc., and Twentieth Century Fox Records Company recorded the speech and offered the recording for sale. Dr. King and his attorneys claimed that the speech was copyrighted and the recording violated that copyright. The court found in favor of Dr. King. Among the papers filed in the case and available at the National Archives at New York City is a deposition given by Martin Luther King, Jr. and signed in his own hand…”

Martin Luther King – I Have A Dream Speech – August 28, 1963 (Full Speech)


“Published on Jan 21, 2013

Subscribe
-~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
I Have a Dream Speech
Martin Luther King’s Address at March on Washington
August 28, 1963. Washington, D.C.
..”

Related:

My Country ‘Tis of Thee (arr. D. Willcocks) — Washington National Cathedral Choir , from youtube.com

Martin Luther King Speaks! “I’ve Been to the Mountaintop” (Full) , from youtube.com
“Published on Jun 10, 2015

Martin Luther King Speaks! “I’ve Been to the Mountaintop” (Full)
3 April 1968 Memphis, Tennessee. Would would become King’s final speech, he talks in support of striking Memphis sanitation workers.

Martin Luther King’s Final Speech: ‘I’ve Been to the Mountaintop’ — The Full Text By THE REV MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. MEMPHIS, Tenn., April 3, 1968 abcnews.go.com

Thank you very kindly, my friends. As I listened to Ralph Abernathy and his eloquent and generous introduction and then thought about myself, I wondered who he was talking about. It’s always good to have your closest friend and associate to say something good about you. And Ralph Abernathy is the best friend that I have in the world. I’m delighted to see each of you here tonight in spite of a storm warning. You reveal that you are determined to go on anyhow.

Something is happening in Memphis; something is happening in our world. And you know, if I were standing at the beginning of time, with the possibility of taking a kind of general and panoramic view of the whole of human history up to now, and the Almighty said to me, “Martin Luther King, which age would you like to live in?” I would take my mental flight by Egypt and I would watch God’s children in their magnificent trek from the dark dungeons of Egypt through, or rather across the Red Sea, through the wilderness on toward the promised land. And in spite of its magnificence, I wouldn’t stop there.

I would move on by Greece and take my mind to Mount Olympus. And I would see Plato, Aristotle, Socrates, Euripides and Aristophanes assembled around the Parthenon. And I would watch them around the Parthenon as they discussed the great and eternal issues of reality. But I wouldn’t stop there.

I would go on, even to the great heyday of the Roman Empire. And I would see developments around there, through various emperors and leaders. But I wouldn’t stop there.

I would even come up to the day of the Renaissance, and get a quick picture of all that the Renaissance did for the cultural and aesthetic life of man. But I wouldn’t stop there.

I would even go by the way that the man for whom I am named had his habitat. And I would watch Martin Luther as he tacked his ninety-five theses on the door at the church of Wittenberg. But I wouldn’t stop there. I would come on up even to 1863, and watch a vacillating President by the name of Abraham Lincoln finally come to the conclusion that he had to sign the Emancipation Proclamation. But I wouldn’t stop there.

I would even come up to the early thirties, and see a man grappling with the problems of the bankruptcy of his nation. And come with an eloquent cry that we have nothing to fear but “fear itself.” But I wouldn’t stop there. Strangely enough, I would turn to the Almighty, and say, “If you allow me to live just a few years in the second half of the 20th century, I will be happy.”

Now that’s a strange statement to make, because the world is all messed up. The nation is sick. Trouble is in the land; confusion all around. That’s a strange statement. But I know, somehow, that only when it is dark enough can you see the stars. And I see God working in this period of the twentieth century in a way that men, in some strange way, are responding. Something is happening in our world. The masses of people are rising up. And wherever they are assembled today, whether they are in Johannesburg, South Africa; Nairobi, Kenya; Accra, Ghana; New York City; Atlanta, Georgia; Jackson, Mississippi; or Memphis, Tennessee — the cry is always the same: “We want to be free.”

And another reason that I’m happy to live in this period is that we have been forced to a point where we are going to have to grapple with the problems that men have been trying to grapple with through history, but the demands didn’t force them to do it. Survival demands that we grapple with them. Men, for years now, have been talking about war and peace. But now, no longer can they just talk about it. It is no longer a choice between violence and nonviolence in this world; it’s nonviolence or nonexistence. That is where we are today.

And also in the human rights revolution, if something isn’t done, and done in a hurry, to bring the colored peoples of the world out of their long years of poverty, their long years of hurt and neglect, the whole world is doomed. Now, I’m just happy that God has allowed me to live in this period to see what is unfolding. And I’m happy that He’s allowed me to be in Memphis.

I can remember — I can remember when Negroes were just going around as Ralph has said, so often, scratching where they didn’t itch, and laughing when they were not tickled. But that day is all over. We mean business now, and we are determined to gain our rightful place in God’s world.

And that’s all this whole thing is about. We aren’t engaged in any negative protest and in any negative arguments with anybody. We are saying that we are determined to be men. We are determined to be people. We are saying — We are saying that we are God’s children. And that we are God’s children, we don’t have to live like we are forced to live.

Now, what does all of this mean in this great period of history? It means that we’ve got to stay together. We’ve got to stay together and maintain unity. You know, whenever Pharaoh wanted to prolong the period of slavery in Egypt, he had a favorite, favorite formula for doing it. What was that? He kept the slaves fighting among themselves. But whenever the slaves get together, something happens in Pharaoh’s court, and he cannot hold the slaves in slavery. When the slaves get together, that’s the beginning of getting out of slavery. Now let us maintain unity.

Secondly, let us keep the issues where they are. The issue is injustice. The issue is the refusal of Memphis to be fair and honest in its dealings with its public servants, who happen to be sanitation workers. Now, we’ve got to keep attention on that. That’s always the problem with a little violence. You know what happened the other day, and the press dealt only with the window-breaking. I read the articles. They very seldom got around to mentioning the fact that one thousand, three hundred sanitation workers are on strike, and that Memphis is not being fair to them, and that Mayor Loeb is in dire need of a doctor. They didn’t get around to that.

Now we’re going to march again, and we’ve got to march again, in order to put the issue where it is supposed to be — and force everybody to see that there are thirteen hundred of God’s children here suffering, sometimes going hungry, going through dark and dreary nights wondering how this thing is going to come out. That’s the issue. And we’ve got to say to the nation: We know how it’s coming out. For when people get caught up with that which is right and they are willing to sacrifice for it, there is no stopping point short of victory. We aren’t going to let any mace stop us. We are masters in our nonviolent movement in disarming police forces; they don’t know what to do. I’ve seen them so often. I remember in Birmingham, Alabama, when we were in that majestic struggle there, we would move out of the 16th Street Baptist Church day after day; by the hundreds we would move out. And Bull Connor would tell them to send the dogs forth, and they did come; but we just went before the dogs singing, “Ain’t gonna let nobody turn me around.”

Bull Connor next would say, “Turn the fire hoses on.” And as I said to you the other night, Bull Connor didn’t know history. He knew a kind of physics that somehow didn’t relate to the transphysics that we knew about. And that was the fact that there was a certain kind of fire that no water could put out. And we went before the fire hoses; we had known water. If we were Baptist or some other denominations, we had been immersed. If we were Methodist, and some others, we had been sprinkled, but we knew water. That couldn’t stop us.

And we just went on before the dogs and we would look at them; and we’d go on before the water hoses and we would look at it, and we’d just go on singing “Over my head I see freedom in the air.” And then we would be thrown in the paddy wagons, and sometimes we were stacked in there like sardines in a can. And they would throw us in, and old Bull would say, “Take ’em off,” and they did; and we would just go in the paddy wagon singing, “We Shall Overcome.”

And every now and then we’d get in jail, and we’d see the jailers looking through the windows being moved by our prayers, and being moved by our words and our songs. And there was a power there which Bull Connor couldn’t adjust to; and so we ended up transforming Bull into a steer, and we won our struggle in Birmingham. Now we’ve got to go on in Memphis just like that. I call upon you to be with us when we go out Monday.

Now about injunctions: We have an injunction and we’re going into court tomorrow morning to fight this illegal, unconstitutional injunction. All we say to America is, “Be true to what you said on paper.” If I lived in China or even Russia, or any totalitarian country, maybe I could understand some of these illegal injunctions. Maybe I could understand the denial of certain basic First Amendment privileges, because they hadn’t committed themselves to that over there.

But somewhere I read of the freedom of assembly. Somewhere I read of the freedom of speech.

Somewhere I read of the freedom of press. Somewhere I read that the greatness of America is the right to protest for right. And so just as I say, we aren’t going to let dogs or water hoses turn us around, we aren’t going to let any injunction turn us around. We are going on.

We need all of you. And you know what’s beautiful to me is to see all of these ministers of the Gospel. It’s a marvelous picture. Who is it that is supposed to articulate the longings and aspirations of the people more than the preacher? Somehow the preacher must have a kind of fire shut up in his bones. And whenever injustice is around he tell it. Somehow the preacher must be an Amos, and saith, “When God speaks who can but prophesy?” Again with Amos, “Let justice roll down like waters and righteousness like a mighty stream.” Somehow the preacher must say with Jesus, “The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, because he hath anointed me,” and he’s anointed me to deal with the problems of the poor.”

And I want to commend the preachers, under the leadership of these noble men: James Lawson, one who has been in this struggle for many years; he’s been to jail for struggling; he’s been kicked out of Vanderbilt University for this struggle, but he’s still going on, fighting for the rights of his people. Reverend Ralph Jackson, Billy Kiles; I could just go right on down the list, but time will not permit.

But I want to thank all of them. And I want you to thank them, because so often, preachers aren’t concerned about anything but themselves. And I’m always happy to see a relevant ministry.

It’s all right to talk about “long white robes over yonder,” in all of its symbolism. But ultimately people want some suits and dresses and shoes to wear down here! It’s all right to talk about “streets flowing with milk and honey,” but God has commanded us to be concerned about the slums down here, and his children who can’t eat three square meals a day. It’s all right to talk about the new Jerusalem, but one day, God’s preacher must talk about the new New York, the new Atlanta, the new Philadelphia, the new Los Angeles, the new Memphis, Tennessee. This is what we have to do.

Now the other thing we’ll have to do is this: Always anchor our external direct action with the power of economic withdrawal. Now, we are poor people. Individually, we are poor when you compare us with white society in America. We are poor. Never stop and forget that collectively — that means all of us together — collectively we are richer than all the nations in the world, with the exception of nine. Did you ever think about that?

After you leave the United States, Soviet Russia, Great Britain, West Germany, France, and I could name the others, the American Negro collectively is richer than most nations of the world. We have an annual income of more than thirty billion dollars a year, which is more than all of the exports of the United States, and more than the national budget of Canada. Did you know that? That’s power right there, if we know how to pool it.

We don’t have to argue with anybody. We don’t have to curse and go around acting bad with our words. We don’t need any bricks and bottles. We don’t need any Molotov cocktails. We just need to go around to these stores, and to these massive industries in our country, and say, “God sent us by here, to say to you that you’re not treating his children right. And we’ve come by here to ask you to make the first item on your agenda fair treatment, where God’s children are concerned.

Now, if you are not prepared to do that, we do have an agenda that we must follow. And our agenda calls for withdrawing economic support from you.”

And so, as a result of this, we are asking you tonight, to go out and tell your neighbors not to buy Coca-Cola in Memphis. Go by and tell them not to buy Sealtest milk. Tell them not to buy — what is the other bread? — Wonder Bread. And what is the other bread company, Jesse? Tell them not to buy Hart’s bread. As Jesse Jackson has said, up to now, only the garbage men have been feeling pain; now we must kind of redistribute the pain.

We are choosing these companies because they haven’t been fair in their hiring policies; and we are choosing them because they can begin the process of saying they are going to support the needs and the rights of these men who are on strike. And then they can move on town — downtown and tell Mayor Loeb to do what is right.

But not only that, we’ve got to strengthen black institutions. I call upon you to take your money out of the banks downtown and deposit your money in Tri-State Bank. We want a “bank-in” movement in Memphis. Go by the savings and loan association. I’m not asking you something that we don’t do ourselves at SCLC. Judge Hooks and others will tell you that we have an account here in the savings and loan association from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

We are telling you to follow what we are doing. Put your money there. You have six or seven black insurance companies here in the city of Memphis. Take out your insurance there. We want to have an “insurance-in.”

Now these are some practical things that we can do. We begin the process of building a greater economic base. And at the same time, we are putting pressure where it really hurts. I ask you to follow through here.

Now, let me say as I move to my conclusion that we’ve got to give ourselves to this struggle until the end.

Nothing would be more tragic than to stop at this point in Memphis. We’ve got to see it through. And when we have our march, you need to be there. If it means leaving work, if it means leaving school — be there. Be concerned about your brother. You may not be on strike. But either we go up together, or we go down together.

Let us develop a kind of dangerous unselfishness. One day a man came to Jesus, and he wanted to raise some questions about some vital matters of life. At points he wanted to trick Jesus, and show him that he knew a little more than Jesus knew and throw him off base…. Now that question could have easily ended up in a philosophical and theological debate. But Jesus immediately pulled that question from mid-air, and placed it on a dangerous curve between Jerusalem and Jericho. And he talked about a certain man, who fell among thieves. You remember that a Levite and a priest passed by on the other side.

They didn’t stop to help him. And finally a man of another race came by. He got down from his beast, decided not to be compassionate by proxy. But he got down with him, administered first aid, and helped the man in need. Jesus ended up saying, this was the good man, this was the great man, because he had the capacity to project the “I” into the “thou,” and to be concerned about his brother.

Now you know, we use our imagination a great deal to try to determine why the priest and the Levite didn’t stop. At times we say they were busy going to a church meeting, an ecclesiastical gathering, and they had to get on down to Jerusalem so they wouldn’t be late for their meeting. At other times we would speculate that there was a religious law that “One who was engaged in religious ceremonials was not to touch a human body twenty-four hours before the ceremony.” And every now and then we begin to wonder whether maybe they were not going down to Jerusalem — or down to Jericho, rather to organize a “Jericho Road Improvement Association.”

That’s a possibility. Maybe they felt that it was better to deal with the problem from the causal root, rather than to get bogged down with an individual effect.

But I’m going to tell you what my imagination tells me. It’s possible that those men were afraid. You see, the Jericho road is a dangerous road. I remember when Mrs. King and I were first in Jerusalem. We rented a car and drove from Jerusalem down to Jericho. And as soon as we got on that road, I said to my wife, “I can see why Jesus used this as the setting for his parable.” It’s a winding, meandering road. It’s really conducive for ambushing. You start out in Jerusalem, which is about 1200 miles — or rather 1200 feet above sea level. And by the time you get down to Jericho, fifteen or twenty minutes later, you’re about 2200 feet below sea level. That’s a dangerous road. In the days of Jesus it came to be known as the “Bloody Pass.”

And you know, it’s possible that the priest and the Levite looked over that man on the ground and wondered if the robbers were still around. Or it’s possible that they felt that the man on the ground was merely faking. And he was acting like he had been robbed and hurt, in order to seize them over there, lure them there for quick and easy seizure. And so the first question that the priest asked — the first question that the Levite asked was, “If I stop to help this man, what will happen to me?” But then the Good Samaritan came by. And he reversed the question: “If I do not stop to help this man, what will happen to him?”

*see Luke 10

That’s the question before you tonight. Not, “If I stop to help the sanitation workers, what will happen to my job. Not, “If I stop to help the sanitation workers what will happen to all of the hours that I usually spend in my office every day and every week as a pastor?” The question is not, “If I stop to help this man in need, what will happen to me?” The question is, “If I do not stop to help the sanitation workers, what will happen to them?” That’s the question.

Let us rise up tonight with a greater readiness. Let us stand with a greater determination. And let us move on in these powerful days, these days of challenge to make America what it ought to be. We have an opportunity to make America a better nation. And I want to thank God, once more, for allowing me to be here with you. You know, several years ago, I was in New York City autographing the first book that I had written. And while sitting there autographing books, a demented black woman came up.

The only question I heard from her was, “Are you Martin Luther King?” And I was looking down writing, and I said, “Yes.” And the next minute I felt something beating on my chest. Before I knew it I had been stabbed by this demented woman. I was rushed to Harlem Hospital. It was a dark Saturday afternoon. And that blade had gone through, and the X-rays revealed that the tip of the blade was on the edge of my aorta, the main artery. And once that’s punctured, your drowned in your own blood — that’s the end of you.

It came out in the New York Times the next morning, that if I had merely sneezed, I would have died. Well, about four days later, they allowed me, after the operation, after my chest had been opened, and the blade had been taken out, to move around in the wheel chair in the hospital.

They allowed me to read some of the mail that came in, and from all over the states and the world, kind letters came in. I read a few, but one of them I will never forget. I had received one from the President and the Vice-President. I’ve forgotten what those telegrams said. I’d received a visit and a letter from the Governor of New York, but I’ve forgotten what that letter said. But there was another letter that came from a little girl, a young girl who was a student at the White Plains High School. And I looked at that letter, and I’ll never forget it. It said simply,

“Dear Dr. King, I am a ninth-grade student at the White Plains High School.”

And she said,

“While it should not matter, I would like to mention that I’m a white girl. I read in the paper of your misfortune, and of your suffering. And I read that if you had sneezed, you would have died. And I’m simply writing you to say that I’m so happy that you didn’t sneeze.”

And I want to say tonight — I want to say tonight that I too am happy that I didn’t sneeze. Because if I had sneezed, I wouldn’t have been around here in 1960, when students all over the South started sitting-in at lunch counters. And I knew that as they were sitting in, they were really standing up for the best in the American dream, and taking the whole nation back to those great wells of democracy which were dug deep by the Founding Fathers in the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution.

If I had sneezed, I wouldn’t have been around here in 1961, when we decided to take a ride for freedom and ended segregation in inter-state travel.

If I had sneezed, I wouldn’t have been around here in 1962, when Negroes in Albany, Georgia, decided to straighten their backs up. And whenever men and women straighten their backs up, they are going somewhere, because a man can’t ride your back unless it is bent.

If I had sneezed — If I had sneezed I wouldn’t have been here in 1963, when the black people of Birmingham, Alabama, aroused the conscience of this nation, and brought into being the Civil Rights Bill.

If I had sneezed, I wouldn’t have had a chance later that year, in August, to try to tell America about a dream that I had had.

If I had sneezed, I wouldn’t have been down in Selma, Alabama, to see the great Movement there.

If I had sneezed, I wouldn’t have been in Memphis to see a community rally around those brothers and sisters who are suffering.

I’m so happy that I didn’t sneeze.

And they were telling me –. Now, it doesn’t matter, now. It really doesn’t matter what happens now. I left Atlanta this morning, and as we got started on the plane, there were six of us.

The pilot said over the public address system, “We are sorry for the delay, but we have Dr. Martin Luther King on the plane. And to be sure that all of the bags were checked, and to be sure that nothing would be wrong with on the plane, we had to check out everything carefully. And we’ve had the plane protected and guarded all night.”

And then I got into Memphis. And some began to say the threats, or talk about the threats that were out. What would happen to me from some of our sick white brothers?

Well, I don’t know what will happen now. We’ve got some difficult days ahead. But it really doesn’t matter with me now, because I’ve been to the mountaintop. And I don’t mind.

Like anybody, I would like to live a long life. Longevity has its place. But I’m not concerned about that now. I just want to do God’s will. And He’s allowed me to go up to the mountain. And I’ve looked over. And I’ve seen the Promised Land. I may not get there with you. But I want you to know tonight, that we, as a people, will get to the promised land!

And so I’m happy, tonight.

I’m not worried about anything.

I’m not fearing any man.

Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord.

Tribute

-Music

“We Shall Overcome” (“trying” to ) Play by Piano (October 28th 2010) , from youtube.com

Learned anything new? What else do you know that wasn’t mentioned about MLK Jr.? What are some ways “we” can keep his dream alive?

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