Omaha Beach

Saving Private Ryan – Omaha Beach HD – YouTube

Bloody Battlefields: The Story Of Omaha Beach (D-Day Documentary) | Timeline

Timeline – World History Documentaries
Published on Nov 9, 2017
Check out our new website for more incredible history documentaries: HD and ad-free. http://bit.ly/2O6zUsK

On 6th June 1944, thousands of American, British, Commonwealth and German troops went to battle in Normandy.

Content licensed from ITV Studios. Any queries, please contact us at: realstories@littledotstudios.com

“Nightime bomber failed to hit their targets in preparation of the Omaha beach landing” 😦

D-Day: Afternoon on Omaha Beach –
What Hitler Did Wrong
worldwar2history.info/
Converted for the Web from “D-Day: June 6, 1944: The Climactic Battle of World War II” by Stephen E. Ambrose
“There was no German counterattack. Rommel’s plans for fighting the D-Day battle were never put into motion. There were many reasons.

First, German surprise was complete. The Fortitude operation had fixed German attention on the Pas-de-Calais. They were certain it would be the site of the battle, and they had placed the bulk of their panzer divisions north and east of the Seine River, where they were unavailable for counterattack in Normandy….

Rundstedt’s reasoning was sound, his action decisive, his orders clear. But the panzer divisions were not under his command. They were in OKW reserve. To save precious time, Rundstedt had first ordered them to move out, then requested OKW approval. OKW did not approve. At 0730 Jodi informed Rundstedt that the two divisions could not be committed until Hitler gave the order, and Hitler was still sleeping. Rundstedt had to countermand the move-out order. Hitler slept until noon….”

10 Things That Went Badly Wrong on Omaha Beach Sep 4, 2015 Joris Nieuwint warhistoryonline.com

..3. Air Force bombardment failed completely

However, they flew in straight from the sea as opposed to parallel to the coast and, to avoid bombing the assault forces, delayed the release of the bombs thereby missing Omaha beach completely. The defenses were left intact; there were no craters on the beach for cover, and some of the bombs hit inland as far as 3 miles from the beach. (Omaha beach, a flawed victory)….

…5. Limited use of special tanks

..Because of lack of time for training the crews or because they were not available in enough quantity for the British and the Americans, no other special tanks were used on Omaha beach. It is now thought that they would have made a difference….”

7 MINUTES TO LIVE: THE EXTRAORDINARY STORY OF D-DAY VETERAN ANDY ANDREWS Jon Brown | Associate Editor dailycaller.com

“….“There we were, in almost total darkness,” Andy described the four-hour ride across the English Channel to France. “Nobody talking, nobody laughing, nobody shooting craps. Everybody quiet. Most of us praying.” By the dim lights inside the hull of USS Henrico, some of the soldiers were reading tiny New Testaments that the Army had given them. The man next to Andy repeated the Lord’s Prayer about 30 times, he remembered in a 2003 interview obtained by the Caller. “That’s all he could say. I figured that was all the prayer he knew.”

“And at that point, I remembered what my pastor said: ‘God will not send you into uncharted territory without giving you the grace to sustain you there.’ And I thought, ‘Boy, oh boy, I really believe that. I believe God’s going to help me.’”

Andy was among the third wave of soldiers to strike Omaha Beach, sparing him the barrage of machine gunfire that had decimated the two before. Climbing down the rope ladder and landing in one of the Higgins boats that circled the troopships, he rolled into a thick layer of vomit — the miserable expression of seasickness and fear that gripped them all. (RELATED: Here’s The Story Behind The Allied Weather Forecast That Saved D-Day)

..”

*see down below for continued story…

7 Minutes To Live: The Extraordinary Story Of D-Day Veteran Andy Andrews

Daily Caller
Published on Jun 6, 2019
The Daily Caller obtained an interview that 91-year-old Andy gave with the Witness to War Foundation in September 2014, a year-and-a-half before he died. He lucidly recalls the most memorable aspects of his wartime ordeals, making good to the end on a promise he made as a young man.

This D-Day we remember his service throughout WWII, starting with his first battle when he landed on Omaha Beach on June 6, 1944.

Behind the Scenes

Saving Private Ryan’s Omaha Beach – Art of The Scene

Post-D-day Landing

SAVING PRIVATE RYAN Ending PART 1 5 HD

Saving Private Ryan (5/7) Movie CLIP – Private Jackson (1998) HD

Saving Private Ryan (6/7) Movie CLIP – Upham Fails Mellish (1998) HD

Saving Private Ryan (7/7) Movie CLIP – Capt. Miller’s Last Stand (1998) HD

Saving Private Ryan: Final Battle Sequence (Movie Clip)

The True Story Of The Niland Brothers Who Inspired ‘Saving Private Ryan’
By Katie Serena
Published May 7, 2018 Updated June 4, 2019 allthatsinteresting.com
“..The 1998 film, which centers on a group of American soldiers tasked with finding the titular comrade whose three other brothers have been killed so that he can be brought home, received 11 Academy Award nominations and earned praise for its realistic portrayal of World War II…

Upon joining the military, brothers Fritz, Bob, Preston, and Edward Niland of Tonawanda, New York were spread out amongst various units with Fritz and Bob in the 501st and 505th Parachute Infantries, respectively, Preston in the 22nd Infantry, and Edward in the Air Force….

On May 16, 1944, less than a month shy of D-Day, Edward Niland was captured by the Japanese. He had parachuted into the jungles of Burma but had missed his mark. Though he managed to evade them for a while, he was captured by the Japanese and brought to a P.O.W. camp in Burma. After he jumped out of his B-25, the rest of his team never heard from him again and assumed he had been killed in action…

When the War Department heard that three of the four brothers had perished, they decided that the remaining brother needed to be brought home — just like in the film….

In May 1945, the Nilands received word that Edward, presumed dead, had in fact been found alive after the camp where he’d been held in Burma was liberated. Now, a second Niland brother was on his way home.

Though there were now only half as many Niland brothers as there had been at the start of the war, the two that were left spent many of their remaining decades together living back home in Tonawanda, New York…

Moreover, the biggest difference between the true story of Saving Private Ryan and the film is that the latter features a dramatic search and rescue mission conducted by a group of U.S. soldiers. In the case of Fritz Niland, no such group was ever organized and he was instead tracked down by a chaplain…

History Buffs: Saving Private Ryan

Behind the Scenes

7 MINUTES TO LIVE: THE EXTRAORDINARY STORY OF D-DAY VETERAN ANDY ANDREWS Jon Brown | Associate Editor dailycaller.com
‘I Christian, Too’

“Andy’s unit pressed across northern France during the summer of 1944, at last breaking through into Germany by September. “Most of my worst battles were in Germany,” Andy said.

Perhaps the most poignant episode Andy ever recounted took place on the early morning of Nov. 19, 1944, outside Hamich, Germany. During the grisly battle for “Hill 232,” which he described as his most harrowing, the Germans attempted to regain the high ground by attacking an American force of about 35, all but five of whom were killed…

After 30 minutes of silence, during which time Andy thought the soldier was dead, a white handkerchief emerged from the darkness and a frightened voice said, in broken English, “Please, may I surrender?” The soldier crawled over to him, covered in blood and badly wounded by Andy’s bullets.

“I reached down and picked him up,” Andy said, asking in broken German what his name was.

“Heinz,” the boy answered.

“Heinz, that’s a good German name,” Andy replied.

“Are you going to kill me?” Andy remembered Heinz asking as he tossed a look over to Andy’s pistol. Andy said he could never do such a thing because that would be murder, and he was a Christian. “I Christian, too,” Heinz said. They also told each other they had both been drafted…’

BLOODY HAMICH – PART 2 By Ben Hilton · March 30, 2018 16thinfantry.com

Other Beaches

THE D-DAY LANDING BEACHES en.normandie-tourisme.fr
“..Preparations on a vast scale went on for months in southern England. Through superior air power and a campaign of misinformation, the Allies managed to keep the German military from learning about the build-up to the invasion. However, the Germans had fortified the Normandy coast, particularly after Hitler had put the extremely competent Rommel in charge of coastal defences along the French coast in 1943…

D-DAY

Then the major D-Day Landings began in the early morning of 6 June. The Allies had divided the 60-mile coastal stretch chosen for the invasion into five sectors, codenamed Sword, Juno, Gold, Omaha and Utah. On the eastern side, British forces were predominant at Sword and Gold, while Canadians led at Juno. Out west at Omaha and Utah, it was American forces who landed. D-Day has come to be seen as a great triumph, but that didn’t mean the Allies who landed here didn’t encounter tough German resistance and suffer some terrible tragedies from the start….

D-Day: Archive video of the Normandy landings – YouTube

Utah Beach

WWII Battlefieds: Chapter III: D-Day area Normandy, France Part II ”E …
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ODwj8kzfpE8
“…Objective:

As a result of the crash of a C-47 killing its company commander, Thomas Meehan III, command of Company E, 2nd Battalion, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment of the 101st Airborne Division devolved to the company executive officer, 1st Lt. Richard Winters. After linking up with his parent unit at the hamlet of Le Grand Chemin on the morning of June 6, 1944, Winters was ordered up front away from his company. With minimal instructions of “There’s fire along that hedgerow there. Take care of it,” and no briefing, Winters found himself tasked to destroy a German artillery battery. The battery had initially been reported to be 88 mm guns firing onto causeway exit #2 leading off Utah Beach and disrupting landing forces of the U.S. 4th Infantry Division advancing inland on this route. Several other units had stumbled onto the German position earlier in the morning and had been repulsed.
After a reconnaissance by Winters at about 0830, he collected a team of thirteen men from his own and other companies. Beyond knowledge of the general location of the gun emplacements south of Le Grand Chemin and without information of the other side of the hedgerow, Winters’ team attacked Brecourt Manor, located three miles southwest of Utah Beach and north of the village of Sainte-Marie-du-Mont. There he discovered No. 6 Battery of the 90th Artillery Regiment, consisting of four 105 mm howitzers connected by trenches and defended by a platoon of soldiers.
Winters held that the unit was part of the 6th Fallschirmjägerregiment (6th Parachute Regiment) with emplaced MG42 machine guns. The 1st Battalion of the 6th had been ordered to Sainte Marie-du-Mont from Carentan during the afternoon but arrived after dark. The 1st Company 919th Grenadier Regiment (709th Infantry Division) was posted at Sainte Marie-du-Mont and was responsible for the area. Elements of 1058th Grenadier Regiment (91st Luftlandedivision) were defending throughout the vicinity, and the artillery was part of this division also. The 795th Georgian Battalion, attached to the 709th ID, was to the northwest at Turqueville but is less likely to have been present because of terrain difficulties. Whichever unit defended the battery, the U.S. paratroopers were opposed by approximately sixty German soldiers.
The crew originally assigned to the four 105mm guns had apparently deserted during the night of the airborne landings. Oberstleutnant Frederich von der Heydte of the German 6th Parachute Regiment, upon discovering they had been abandoned while observing the landings at Utah Beach, traveled to Carentan where he ordered his 1st Battalion to find men and work on the artillery battery.”

Battle:

Upon arrival at the battery location, Winters made his plan. He positioned a pair of M1919 .30 caliber machine guns for covering fire and sent several soldiers (2nd Lt. Lynn D. Compton, Pvt. Donald Malarkey and Sgt. William J. Guarnere) to one flank to destroy a machine gun position with grenades and provide covering fire.
While the trenches connecting the artillery positions provided the Germans with an easy way to supply and reinforce the guns, they also proved to be their biggest weakness. After destroying the first gun position, Winters and the rest of his team used the trenches as covered approaches to attack the remaining guns in turn. Each gun was destroyed by placing a block of TNT down its barrel and using German stick grenades to set off the charges.
Reinforcements from Company D, led by 2nd Lt. Ronald C. Speirs, arrived to complete the assault on the fourth and last gun. Speirs had a reputation as an excellent and extremely aggressive officer and he led his men against the last gun position by running outside the trenches and exposing themselves to enemy fire.
After the four guns were disabled, Winters’ team came under heavy machine-gun fire from Brécourt Manor and withdrew. He had discovered a German map in one gun position that was marked with the locations of all German artillery and machine gun positions throughout that area of the Cotentin Peninsula. This was an invaluable piece of intelligence, and once Winters returned to Le Grand Chemin passed it on to the 2nd Battalion intelligence officer (S-2) (and close personal friend) Lt. Lewis Nixon. Nixon, realizing this to be an essential piece of intelligence, ran the 3 miles to Utah Beach and passed the information up the chain of command. Command was so thrilled with the information provided by Nixon and Winters that it sent the first two tanks to reach Utah Beach to support the paratroopers

AVweb Normandy Visit Brecourt Manor – YouTube

Utah Beach – Brecourt Manor – YouTube

Juno Beach

Canadian Army in Normandy Campaign

Canadian D-Day 75 ceremony held on Juno Beach | FULL

Before D-Day’s Normandy Landing!

The Blimps: The Defenders Of The Skies In Two World Wars INSTANT ARTICLESMILITARY VEHICLESWORLD WAR IIJan 11, 2017 Nikola Budanovic warhistoryonline.com
“..By 1918 London had developed a 50-mile net made of barrage balloons, providing protection against the most advanced German bombers at the time. Many reports from the period state that captured German pilots were terrified of the net. The only effective counter-measure were wire cutters installed on the wings of an aircraft. However, such measures would not be developed before the outbreak of WWII.

..”

D-Day Blimps over war ships archival footage – YouTube

JUNE 6, 1944: ARTIFICIAL HARBOR PAVES THE WAY FOR NORMANDY INVASION AUTHOR: TONY LONGTONY LONG 06.06.1206:30 AM JUNE 6, 2012 wired.com
“…Enter Mulberry Harbor (or, more correctly in this case, “harbour”). Mulberry, a British inspiration born out of the Dieppe debacle, was a massive artificial harbor, prefabricated in England and towed across the English Channel for assembly off the invasion beaches. The harbor consisted of several elements, including massive reinforced concrete caissons, breakwaters, a floating roadway and piers. Block ships were sunk off the Normandy coast to create protection from the open sea.

Two harbors were built and operational within three days of the invasion: Mulberry A for the Americans at Omaha Beach and Mulberry B serving the British and Canadians at Arromanches. A heavy storm destroyed the American harbor on June 19 but Mulberry B remained in use for eight months. In the first 100 days following D-Day, the harbor landed over 2.5 million men, 500,000 vehicles and 4 million tons of supplies for the Battle of Normandy…”

The Secret Invention That Made D-Day Possible | INTEL

Forces TV
Published on Jun 7, 2019
As much as the success of D-Day was down to the bravery of soldiers… it was made possible by inventions and new machines. These Mulberry Harbours were a real World War 2 engineering victory.

More Mulberry: https://www.forces.net/d-day/mulberry…
Forces Net D-Day Hub: http://forces.net/dday

Operation Overlord & Neptune (D-Day documentary)

How Astronomy Helped Turn the Tide for the Allies on D-Day By Mike Wall 3 days ago Science & Astronomy space.com
Planners used knowledge of moon phases and tides.
“…The success of this bold and dramatic maneuver, known as the D-Day invasion, helped turn the tide of World War II. And astronomy helped make it happen, according to celestial sleuth Donald Olson.

..

“A spring invasion in May or June was ideal, because that would leave the entire summer for the Allied forces to drive back the German forces before bad weather set in with the coming of fall and winter,” Olson said. “Invasion preparations weren’t complete by May, so General Dwight D. Eisenhower [commander of the Allied forces in northwest Europe] postponed the assault until June.”

…”

After D-Day’s Normandy Landing

UTAH Beach Infantry

Normandy — D-Day — 6 June 1944
Brécourt Manor, Sainte-Marie-du-Mont, Angoville au Plain, Carentan, and Mont Saint-Michel
cromwell-intl.com

Band Of Brothers – All The Interviews With The Soilders Of Easy Company

Elliott Walsh
Published on Dec 15, 2012
All the interviews with the soldiers from the amazing tv series Band Of Brothers. I’ve never had any direct experience of war and I found these interviews really compelling and deeply moving.

Band of Brothers Memorial at Brécourt, Normandy – YouTube

Rhodiola
Published on May 20, 2017
This is a memorial site to the Easy Company attack on the Brécourt Manor Gun Battery.
The gun site was across the field behind the tree line.

After D-Day an American hospital was later set up in this field.

Easy company 101st airborne division.

Caen City

D-Day: French resentment over Allied bombing of Caen – YouTube

Post-War Overall

D-Day Tours Normandy. The landing beaches, the … – YouTube

Archive for the ‘The True Origins of WWII’ Category ironlight.wordpress.com
“..Intentionally or otherwise, the BBC misses the mark with respect to its peripheral mention of Joseph Goebbels and National Socialist propaganda (allegedly inspired by Bernays, which is rubbish)… But in this day and age, I could hardly expect otherwise. To their deserved credit, they do manage to get much correct and, in the course of their exploration, come much closer to certain forbidden truths than they likely intended. Thoughtfully counterbalance the information presented through this documentary with what you’ve (hopefully) already studied of the occupied news and entertainment media, the Neoconservative movement, the Zionist Power Configuration (Z.P.C.), the Frankfurt School/Political Correctness, the international “bankster gangsters”, and the chief proponents and beneficiaries of the wars of the last 100 years (as well as the unseen catalysts, historical deceptions, and false-flags which, more often than not, lead us there), and the value of its core-message will more than triple. -W..””

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