STAND

Why we stand for the flag: Gen. Dempsey Martin E. Dempsey Published 5:04 a.m. ET Sept. 18, 2016 | Updated 9:12 a.m. ET Sept. 25, 2017 usatoday.com
“…Life presents plenty of opportunities for us to disagree with one another and seemingly fewer opportunities on which we agree. Standing together during the national anthem at sporting events should be one of those times when we agree, when we focus on the things that bind us together, even as we prepare to let our voices be heard in disagreement about which team is the better team…

It’s important to remember that our military is composed entirely of volunteers. It obviously takes a special kind of patriotism for people to volunteer to risk their life for their country. Theirs is not blind patriotism that pretends there is nothing wrong with the country. Every man and woman in uniform knows we still have work to do to achieve the equality, opportunity and justice for all to which we aspire. But every member of the military also knows that what is right about America is worth defending. And if it’s worth defending, it’s worth honoring…”

Neutral Perspective

Refusing to Stand for the National Anthem: Top 3 Pros and Cons Wednesday, Sep. 27, 2017 | ProCon.org | MORE HEADLINES procon.org
“…People who support refusing to stand for the national anthem argue that athletes are justified in using their celebrity status to bring attention to important issues, and that refusing to stand for the national anthem is an appropriate and effective method of peaceful protest. People who disagree argue that football games are an inappropriate place to engage in political protest, and that not standing for the national anthem shows disrespect for the country and those who proudly support it, some with their lives…”

NOT STAND

High School

Tensions high at Edina High School after lawsuit from conservative group
Tensions high at Edina HS after lawsuit from conservative group
Author: Lou Raguse
Published: 10:10 PM CST December 11, 2017 kare11.com

‘EDINA, Minn. – When she and 10 other Edina High School students sat during the playing of taps at a Veteran’s Day ceremony last month, junior Samira Kalmoi says she knew exactly what she was doing.

“Taps, national anthem, I don’t feel I should be standing for that, because I don’t believe in it,” said Kalmoi, the president of the school’s Black Student Union. “I don’t believe in it, because there is not freedom and justice for all.”

That protest led to verbal and written clashes between students, and last week a lawsuit filed by members of the Young Conservative Club, who claim the district shut down their group and violated their First Amendment rights.

Days later, the two sides still starkly disagree and say there is now added tension in the hallways of Edina High School.

“That was the problem with these students, is that they were attacking other students. And then they played that victim card so that it didn’t look as bad,” Kalmoi said.

“I think the easy way to get at this is to make it a racial thing, and it’s not. And it’s about respecting the rights of protesters and the right to disagree with those protesters,” said Geoff Spades, the father of the president of the school’s Young Conservative Club.

Spades says his son has been harassed every day since the lawsuit was filed.

“He gets threatened on social media, threatened he’s going to get jumped,” Spades said.

But Spades believes the problem at Edina High School goes beyond the Taps protest and how the school handled it. He believes teachers focus on politics from liberal viewpoints in just about every class.

“I’d like to think that if my son goes into a math class, he’s being taught math. And neither his politics nor the teacher’s politics really matter,” Spades said.

Meanwhile, Kalmoi believes families with those frustrations aren’t seeing the viewpoint of minority students.

“They’re blinded by their privilege. That’s what I would say,” Kalmoi said…”

Natives

My decision and my right’ — teen has sat out Pledge of Allegiance for years By Mayra Cuevas, CNN Updated 7:45 PM ET, Fri September 16, 2016 cnn.com
“… (CNN)Long before Colin Kaepernick refused to stand for the national anthem, sparking a national dialogue, there was Leilani Thomas.
Leilani, now 14, has sat out the Pledge of Allegiance since the second grade.
“Most of my teachers, they respected my decision and my right and belief. So they never said anything about it,” she told CNN during a phone interview Friday. “I think the pledge is a lie to me and it’s a lie to my people.”

Leilani and her family are part of the Elem Indian Colony — a Native American tribe in Northern California, where she attends Lower Lake High School as a freshman. …

Thomas was to join the North Dakota’s Standing Rock Sioux Tribe in their fight against the Dakota Access Pipeline when Leilani told him about the situation with the pledge and her grades. He decided to stay and stand by his daughter instead.
But even 1,500 miles away from North Dakota, Leilani says she will find a way to make her voice heard in support of Standing Rock.
“As they say ‘justice for all’– we think that is a lie. What they did to my people not long ago? And not so long ago. They still do it today for example with Standing Rock in North Dakota. I want people to realize what has happened and is still happening to the native people to this day. I have my rights to do so,” she said. ..”

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