My name is Salvador, who is a second generation Filipino American living in Minnesota-U.S.A. My great great grandparents (father’s side) is Spanish, so I would have to say it was “good” that the the “Spanish” colonized the Philippines, but “bad” about the “other stuff” that will be mentioned above.

The Spanish Influence on the Philippines


“Published on May 29, 2012

The Spanish and how they influenced the history and culture of the Philippines.”

“Good”

Advantages of spanish colonization in Philippines? answers.com
“..Spanish colonization in the Philippines brought several advantages, including wealth and monetary prosperity. It also brought the advantage of improved technology to the area. ..”

-British Occupation

Colonialism, how did the PH benefit?
March 31, 2015 8:35 pm manilatimes.net
“…In their tramping around the world, they put in place parliamentary systems of government, legal systems that work, infrastructural administrative systems, postal services and educational systems which, at a glance, appear to be counter to the colonialist model of exploitation, rape and pillage. They also built railways; Argentina, China, Thailand, Chile, Brazil, Mexico (not formal colonies), India, South Africa, Uganda, Malaysia, the USA and Canada. They built roads and established marine passenger transport and air routes. They set up and ran the Chinese customs and postal services for over 100 years even though China was not officially a colony…”

SONA: “Great British Festival,” ipinagdiriwang ngayon sa Metro Manila

-U.S. Occupation

“Legacies of Colonialism”what benefits, if any, there were in colonialism? Give examples. If there were no benefits, explain this view. Examine and explain what you consider to be the most serious… Topic: History enotes.com
“…There were some benefits to colonialism, depending on the country. For example, the United States brought more democracy and economic expansion to the Philippines than would (arguably) have existed if the US had never colonized the islands. As someone who is half-Filipino myself, I am not trying to claim that the US occupation was all for the good. However, the Philippines were, for example, the first country in Asia to have a freely elected national legislature. This, along with the sorts of economic and social (education, hygiene) changes brought by the Americans show that colonialism was not always 100% bad…”

Manila During American Occupation (1920s) – YouTube

-Roads

Kennon Road and Baguio by Ernesto R. Zárate, FPIA gobaguio.com
The epic of Kennon Road is a part of the story of Baguio.
Without it, Baguio would not have survived.
“..La Trinidad, became a foothold to the Cordillera Mountains. Through the years the Spanish tried to institute order, build churches and schools, make trails and introduce the planting of vegetables and coffee…

The coming of the Americans

…As early as 1892, a young American zoologist from Michigan,
Dean Conant Worcester, heard about this fabulous place from one Domingo Sanchez, a member of the Spanish Forestry Bureau. (Worcester would later become a member of the Philippine Commission.) In July 1900, he led a group of Americans on an expedition to the Benguet region and that trip resulted in the birth of Baguio.

The first American explorers were smitten with the weather and landscape and decided that it would be an ideal site for a future city and summer retreat from the sweltering heat of the lowlands. It did not take long for Gov. William Howard Taft (who later became President of the United States) and other officials to agree that this should be the location for the summer capital and health resort of the Philippines…

..Disquieting rumors were also rife as to the practicability of completing the road. There was a difference of opinion between the engineer in charge and one of his immediate subordinates. They could not agree on which route should be followed. The consulting engineer of the commission was thus ordered to make a survey. He reported that the route that was started was the more feasible course, but to complete the project, at least $1,000,000.00 would be needed. Not wanting to relive the experience the Commission had with Engr. Meade, they solicited expert advice, from Colonel Lyman W. V. Kennon, a man of great energy and executive ability, who had had vast experience in engineering work in mountainous country…”


*see Philippines: Baguio City in Benguet Province smiletravelingblog.wordpress.com

…In addition to the roadbed itself, Colonel Kennon constructed 40 bridges—two of which were made of steel, the others of wood. Except for the use of dynamite to blast out solid rock, it must be noted that there were no heavy equipment then—work was done usually with ordinary picks and shovels. This was no small feat in 1905. Still, according to engineering experts, it was the most expensive engineering work at that time, a big drain on the colonial budget….

In other words, what we see and admire as the Zigzag portion of Kennon Road was actually the result of a grave engineering error—a basic blunder where the lower portion of the road did not meet as it should with the upper section. But the Americans did not condemn this mistake—they glorified it. To paraphrase an old Tagalog maxim: “Bato na ginawang ginto.”

Nevertheless, it cannot be denied that the completion of the Kennon Road in 1905, just five years after the American colonial government authorized its construction, opened up Baguio and soon the rest of the Cordillera region to the world. More than that, it spurred the development of Baguio and nearby areas so that in 1920, the city was already a thriving population center.”

Zigzaging Kennon Road, Baguio City, Philippines

DEBATE

-Christianized?
*see Religion: What is Christianity? goodnewseverybodycom.wordpress.com

Spanish Influence on Language, Culture, and Philippine History filipinokastila.tripod.com
“..The Filipino populace embraced Spanish Roman Catholic Christianity almost unquestioningly. The Spanish authorities congregated the scattered Filipino population into clustered village settlements, where they could more easily be instructed and Christianized under a friar’s eye. This policy paved the way for the emergence of the present system of politico-territorial organization of villages, towns, and provinces. At the same time, the compact villages which were literally under the bells of the Roman Catholic Church permitted the regular clergy to wake up the villagers each day, summon them to mass, and subject them to religious indoctrination or cathechismal instruction. This process enabled the Church to play a central role in the lives of the people because it touched every aspect of their existence from birth to growth to marriage to adulthood to death. Whether the natives clearly understood the tenets and dogmas of the Roman Catholic Church is of course another matter. Some scholars claim that the Spaniards only superficially Christianized the Filipinos, most of whom learned to recite the prayers and chants by rote, without any idea as to their meaning. Some native inhabitants became only nominal Christians. At any rate, there is no denying the fact that many Filipinos defended the Catholic faith devotedly. ..”
CHRISTIANITY IN THE PHILIPPINES Professor Susan Russell
Department of Anthropology seasite.niu.edu

“…Christianity in the Philippines Today:

Christianity in the Philippines today, unlike during the Spanish period, is a mixture of nationalistic efforts by local peoples to ‘Filipinize’ Roman Catholicism and the efforts of a variety of Protestant missionizing successes. In the American colonial period, 1900-1946, a lot of Protestant teachers and missionaries came to the Philippines to ‘purify’ what they viewed as the incorrect or ‘syncretic’ characteristics of charismatic blends of Filipino Roman Catholicism. The Aglipayans were among the first to try to Filipinize Roman Catholicism and were popular in the early part of American colonial rule. The Iglesia ni Kristo is another Filipino-founded sect that has found strong support among well-to-do Filipinos.

In remoter parts of the Philippines, where Spanish colonialism and Roman Catholicism never penetrated until the beginning of the 20th century, a variety of Christian missionaries compete for new converts. Seventh Day Adventists and Jehovah’s Witnesses typically go door-to-door, spreading the specific messages that their sects support. In traditional, staunchly Roman Catholic areas, their missionizing efforts and attacks on syncretic forms of Roman Catholicism are often unwelcome. In areas where Roman Catholicism is still fairly recent, the missionaries carry messages that are more carefully listened to by local Filipinos. What was once a truly Roman Catholic country in terms of the population has given way to a variety of forms of Christianity.

In the Luzon highlands, for example, where many indigenous ethno-linguistic groups resisted Spanish rule, Roman Catholic or Anglican priests today have a fairly comfortable accommodation with indigenous forms of ritual and belief. Local peoples follow traditional customs related to burial rites, but often invite Christian priests to celebrate the last rites or formal burial rites in addition. The advantage of this kind of syncretism is that people’s beliefs and support for their traditions are not lost, but simply accommodated with beliefs and practices associated with the newer religion. Many recent Protestant missionaries, in contrast, fail to recognize the value of supporting indigenous customs, and simply attack local religious practices as evil. Their meager success in attracting converts speaks to the need for understanding the context in which American religious practice can flourish…”

Catholicism in the Philippines rlp.hds.harvard.edu

“..By his second term in office, Marcos blamed Catholic priests, many of whom were now openly criticizing him, for fomenting student and leftist protests against his rule. As elsewhere in the world, the Catholic Church in the Philippines was profoundly impacted by Vatican II and was working more closely with impoverished Filipinos on basic issues of social justice. Marcos worked to discredit the Catholic Church, accusing it of sympathizing with Filipino communists. To heighten his own Catholic credentials, he invited Pope Paul VI to the Philippines, though the Pope himself was unwilling to play the role assigned to him and both he and the Church made a clear and concerted effort to sideline Marcos and his wife from official functions…”
*see Deep Thought: What are considered “idols”? goodnewseverybodycom.wordpress.com
What are the positive and negative effects of spanish contributions in the Philippines? answers.yahoo.com
“Let’s answer this via the timeline. First and foremost, the colonization of the Spaniards introduced the Philippines to the “modern world”. As a matter of fact, the Philippines wasn’t even a country when the Spaniards came. It was just a series of islands with different tribes living in different “barangays.” BUT they did have a form of organization. The positive effect simply is that the coming of the Spaniards, aside from bringing together the 1000+ islands under one flag, helped the Philippines become a modern country. The Europeans were at the forefront of progress and modernity at the time. Clearly, one negative effect was the maltreatment of the Spaniards (most particularly the friars) towards the Indios. But a positive effect that grew out of that was the birth of Nationalism, which Rizal and the other ilustrados brought into fruition. Now fast-forward to today. If you notice how divided the nation is in terms of social classes (the poor are the majority in terms of numbers but are the minority in terms of power while the rich are the complete opposite), as well as the corruption, it all goes back to the Spanish colonial times. The way the friars and the Spanish government ran the country is still the same way people run the country today. It’s whoever has the money has the power. Don’t get me wrong, I think it’s unfair to blame the Spaniards for it, since the Philippines has gone this far already. All I’m saying is that corruption, this hacienda mentality, goes all the way back to the Spanish colonial period. I hope this answers your question.
By the way, I think the Church, originally wasn’t so good, but at the same time it wasn’t so bad either. The Spaniards used it to “brainwash” the Indios into doing what they (the colonizers) wanted (e.g. the friars were one of the most corrupt people during the Spanish colonial period but no one could touch them because they were “God’s servants”). But the Church also brought the people together and now is part of the beautiful and colorful Filipino culture…”- DJA · 6 years ago …

Effects Of Spanish Colonization In The Philippines Free … studymode.com
Conflict in Philippines: The After-Effects of Colonization
History Day

by Mark Reniel Zarsadias on 29 May 2013 prezi.com

-U.S. Occupation

American Influences in the Philippines – YouTube
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cyGwnCj8RVg
*education system, colonial mentality, resources taken, etc…

Impact of American Colonization in the Philippines

American Colonial Period

ADVANTAGES AND DISADVANTAGES OF IMPERIALISM IN THE PHILIPPINES

“Bad”

10 Reasons Why Life Was Better In Pre-Colonial Philippines
By FilipiKnow | 11/11/2014 filipiknow.net
“While Filipinos nowadays are fairly knowledgeable of the Spanish, American, and Japanese eras in the Philippines, the same cannot be said when it comes to the country’s pre-colonial era. Which is a shame actually, because even before the coming of the three foreign races, our ancestors were pretty much living in a veritable paradise….”

-U.S. Occupation

Colonial Mentality, “Damaged Culture,” IMSCF of Filipinos: Its Roots thefilipinomind.com
“…Americanized: conditioned to knowingly or unknowingly think and analyze economic and political issues in his own homeland (and abroad) from the American point of view.

In the long-run, his alienated heart and mind brought to the Filipino and the homeland only ever-deepening poverty, and its consequent illiteracy, hunger and damaged culture. ..”
US War Crimes in the Phillipines – world future fund worldfuturefund.org
“…For all the talk of bringing “civilization” to the Philippines, American commanders responded to the Filipino insurgency with the utmost brutality. Over the course of the next decade, and especially in the first few years of the conflict, it became commonplace for entire villages to be burned and whole populations to be imprisoned in concentration camps. No mercy was accorded to Filipino prisoner, a large number of whom were shot. This certainly was not in keeping with the spirit of “benevolent assimilation” proclaimed by President McKinley.

From Liberators to Killers: American Attitudes Toward Filipinos

The attitudes of American commanders involved in pacifying the Philippines are remarkable for both their disdain for the people they had allegedly “liberated” and their willingness to resort to the most ruthless methods in suppressing resistance. For example, General J.M. Bell, wrote in December 1901:..”

The Filipino-American War 1899-1902 – YouTube

The Philippine American War in 4 Minutes – YouTube

The Philippine American War-The Shocking Truth
https://youtu.be/bN2wrZGcs8s
“OurPlanetExplained
Published on Jun 25, 2016
Hi my name is Joshua Petrikat. This video is about the shocking truth of the Philippine-American War. Many textbooks including the one used for the school I went to purposely hid this topic because of facts that embarrass the United States and contradict what the US originally said about foreign policy. In this video I talk about many ignored and hidden facts of the Philippine-American War and prove that textbooks often hide this part of American history. The series Hidden History will be a new regular series where I will talk about history that is usually not covered in history books. This is my first video for this series so I hope you will enjoy it. Please share, like, and subscribe!

-Japanese

CULTURAL BRIDGE PRODUCTIONS:
Amerikanitos, life during the japanese occupation of the philippines
johnsheaodonnell.com
“..[The Japanese invasion of Luzon consisted of air attacks from December 9 through the 12th. On the evening of the twelfth, the Japanese were reported to be landing at Vigan in Northern Luzon and Japanese naval forces were sited off Pangasinan Province heading south.]

After a while we were informed that it wasn’t safe underneath the house because the Japanese might parachute to the ground. We could hear gunfire, but I didn’t know what was happening. We decided to abandon the house and go sleep outside with numerous other families (about fifty) on the grass away from the houses and other buildings. There were lots of rumors about deaths of soldiers and everyone was praying. We heard that gas masks were being distributed at the community store so I went to get some for our family. When I arrived, I was told that each family was only to receive one gas mask so I went back to where our family was and told my mother. She told me, “Don’t take one then. If only one will live, the rest will die. We might as well all die together. So we’ll pray, and God will protect us.” ..”

*see GoodnewsEverybody.com Filipino: Military-Spanish-American War, World War II History, etc.. asian.goodnewseverybody.com

Philippine History World War 2 and Japanese Occupation – YouTube

MISC.

Philippine independence declared history.com
“June 12th 1898-This Day in History..”

What are your thoughts? Any other sources that can support any of the sides above?

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