Early this past weekend (“Friday the 13th” November of 2015), I almost hit a deer..again! I was driving south on a county road from Kensington to Cyrus coming back from visiting a friend in Wadena. I usually drive the speed limit (exactly) at night because it’s darker and it’s deer season. I’ve learned in the past during the deer season (I almost a hit a deer that just came out of the ditch going to Morris from Wheaton, Minnesota. I was driving the speed limit too and just nicked the leg as it crossed safely the highway as I tapped on my brakes gently and keep going.) to be more cautious than usual because it’s that time of the year where more deer are running around.

Ironically, I was sharing this past deer story with some folks at Wadena when a friend brought the story up. Some folks present shared to be extra cautious with the abundance of deer by their home in Wadena when going “home”.

As I was driving this county highway towards Cyrus, this deer was about to cross the highway. I slowly moved to my left crossing the median (no cars coming) as I lightly tapped my brakes. The deer decided to just galloped parallel with me driving south on this highway instead of crossing. I was like, “wow, I never seen the deer do that maneuver before”. I thank my Heavenly Father for sparing my car from getting damage as I’ve heard many stories of those that haven’t been fortunate 🙂

Defensive Driving Tips:

Avoiding Deer on the Road: Car Expert Lauren Fix – YouTube

How To Avoid Deer Vehicle Collisions – Steps to take to … – YouTube

MYTH #1: Always swerve to avoid hitting a deer. Actually, police statistics show that most motorist deaths and injuries occur when drivers swerve to avoid hitting the deer and strike a fixed object, such as a tree or another vehicle. It may seem powerless, but simply applying your brakes while you’re buckled up, gripping the steering wheel with both hands, and coming to a controlled stop (if possible) can actually help minimize damage and injuries. MYTH #2: Motorcyclists are not as likely to strike a deer. In fact, motorcyclists are more vulnerable to death or injury in motorcycle-deer crashes. More than 80 percent of all motorcycle-deer crashes involve an injury. MYTH #3: Deer are usually out at dusk. In addition to dusk, you should watch for deer during their prime feeding times; especially at dawn and the first few hours of darkness. Myth #4 – Hunting reduce Deer Vehicle Accident ABSOLUTELY NOT in fact hunting makes deer vehicle accident worse (see last portion below and link) Here are some other tips Allstate recommends: — Be especially cautious when driving on two-lane roads and rural roads. — If you see one deer cross, slow down and watch for others to follow. — Glance continually from the road to the roadside, looking for movement where roads are bordered by fields or natural habitat. — Heed deer crossing signs and reduce speed in deer “hot spots.” — At night, watch for reflection from headlights in the eyes of deer. — If a deer “freezes” in your headlights, turn your lights off and then on. For more information on this and other safety topics, visit http://www.allstate.com.

Car hits animal and how to prevent a car accident – YouTube

*see Defensive Driving Stories goodnewseverybodycom.wordpress.com

Got any similar deer stories on the road?

Good News Automobile
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