STATS

Managing the Challenges of Sex Offender Reentry
February 2007 csom.org
Incarceration, Release, and Reincarceration Trends with Sex Offenders

Of the roughly 1.5 million individuals incarcerated in state and federal prisons throughout the United States, it is estimated that approximately 150,000 are imprisoned for a sex offense conviction – 40% for rape, and 60% for other sexual assaults such as lewd acts with children, fondling, molestation, statutory rape, indecent practices, and other related offenses (Harrison & Beck, 2006). Recognizing the variations from state to state, convicted sex offenders represent between 10 and 30 percent of prison populations (see, e.g., Bynum, Huebner, & Burgess-Proctor, 2002; Greenfeld, 1997; Harrison & Beck, 2006)…..

In terms of “staying out,” a recent national study revealed that nearly half of released sex offenders (43%)
were rearrested for at least one new crime – and well over one-third were returned to prison – within three years (Langanet al., 2003).

Returns to prisons were generally not, however, because of new sex crimes. In fact, only 5.1% of the released
sex offenders were rearrested for another sex offense during that period of time, and only 3.5% were reconvicted of another sex crime. The clear majority of sex offenders (71%) were returned to prison for
technical violations of release conditions or were rearrested, and the remaining reincarcerations (23.9%) were the result of new sentences for additional crimes. …

GEOGRAPHICALLY

-Michigan

Judge rules parts of Michigan sex offender law are unconstitutional
Published On: Apr 07 2015 06:22:56 PM EDT Updated On: Apr 07 2015 06:23:33 PM EDT clickondetroit.com
“The ACLU of Michigan has successfully argued that some parts of the law are too vague.”

-Minnesota

Sex Offenders and Predatory Offenders:
Minnesota Criminal and Civil Regulatory Laws
house.leg.state.mn.us
Judge Wants Alternative Structure to Sex Offender Program Updated: 06/17/2015 9:04 PM
Created: 06/17/2015 11:01 AM KSTP.com
By: Jennie Lissarrague
“… However, as of October 2012, the program’s timeline indicated a range of 6-9 years for a “model” client to progress from Phase I through Phase III. Some committed individuals have been confined for more than 20 years.

Comparison to Other States

According to the ruling, Minnesota currently has the lowest rate of release from commitment in the nation and the highest per-capita population of civilly committed sex offenders in the nation.

Only three people have ever been provisionally discharged in the program’s more than 20 years. One returned after violating the conditions of his release and died in the program. Two are now in community-based programs under intense supervision.

A study was published last October on Sex Offender Civil Commitment Programs…
Legal Topics: Sex Offender Statutes, Minnesota, from mn.gov
Minnesota sex offender program is ruled unconstitutional By Chris Serres Star Tribune
June 17, 2015 — 11:43pm startribune.com
“..The ruling sets the stage for what could be a long and bruising battle between the courts and state officials over reforming a system that has been widely criticized for locking up too many sex offenders for too long. Frank called on legislators and the state’s executive leadership to “fashion suitable remedies” in time for an Aug. 10 hearing in his courtroom…”

-Texas

Texas in final stages to allow some sex offenders to deregister from list mrt.com
“…Also, offenders must not be convicted of any crime for which imprisonment for more than one year could be imposed during the registration period; offenders must not be convicted of any sexual crimes during registration; the offender must complete all treatment and must have finished all supervised probation or parole…
..”

HOUSING

Sex Offender Group Home Changes Focus, Neighbors Still Fight it
Posted: Mar 03, 2015 9:52 AM CDT myfoxorlando.com

Housing and Placement – Center for Sex Offender … from csom.org

“…A particularly promising example of managing sex offender housing challenges involves inviting housing representatives to participate proactively in the transition planning process as members of multi–disciplinary teams. The benefits of such an approach are numerous, including the following (Cowan et al., 1999):

Housing officials are more willing to make homes available to reentering sex offenders;
Specific attempts are made to minimize negative sentiment and unnecessary fears among local tenants;
Supervision agencies and law enforcement officials make commitments to provide ongoing support and increased monitoring in those areas where sex offenders are housed after release; and
Greater confidence is instilled with respect to the sex offender management practices in place in the community.
…”

=>Ministries

Phoenix ministry among few places helping sex offenders start anew By Michelle Ye Hee Lee The Republic | azcentral.com Wed Dec 5, 2012 12:59 AM azcentral.com
“…Redeemed Outreach is one of a handful of faith-based organizations in Phoenix where convicted sex offenders can go upon release from prison. The ministry is one model that local and national experts say could help solve the problem of how to successfully reintegrate sex offenders into society without losing track of them on the streets or encouraging recidivism.

Moriarty’s ministry is a little of everything: halfway house, rehabilitation center, workforce-training program, religious refuge.

Here, a resident is not judged for his crime, beaten up, or labeled an “S.O.” (shorthand for sex offender). Instead, all receive shelter, clothing, food, camaraderie and a chance to try to turn their lives around. Anyone is welcome, regardless of criminal history.

It is a no-nonsense place. The pastors run a disciplined program designed to help newly released sex offenders, many under state or county supervision, structure their daily routines and lead faithful lives. “Amen” and “God bless” are part of the everyday vernacular.

Everyone must follow the rules. No drugs, alcohol, smoking, profanity, stealing, fighting, threats or porn allowed. Phone access and TV watching is limited. Everyone must attend and be on time for church services, Bible studies and meals. Music must have Christian lyrics and is played only after 4 p.m. and through earphones.

The eight-month “discipleship” program has three phases that, if successful, help inmates rebuild personal relationships, find spirituality and rejoin society.

At first, outside contacts are restricted as the participants immerse themselves in Bible studies and personal introspection and improvement, including substance-abuse and anger-management counseling. Next, they get job training and help finding work. Room, personal-hygiene items, food, bedding and counseling are free.

Once participants find employment, they must donate one-third of their earnings to the ministry. The goal is to transition into their own housing, after which they are encouraged to continue helping others like themselves.

Redeemed Outreach offers offenders fresh out of prison help in navigating the world outside the walls. There is plenty to take care of, whether registering with various agencies to comply with the law or relearning the basics of life on the outside. Even elementary tasks can seem daunting to those who went to prison up to two decades ago, before the arrival of things like smartphones.

Participants hear about Redeemed Outreach through other prisoners, a prison chaplain or ministry pastors who preach in the prison yard. Arthur Diaz, for example, heard about the ministry in prison. He is a Level 3 sex offender, convicted of attempted sexual assault, kidnapping and failure to register.

Diaz, now trying to live a drug-free life, recalled how he first landed at one of the ministry’s properties. He’d borrowed enough money to buy a one-way, light-rail ride there. He was parched as he came down from a methamphetamine high.

“I got to the church and I told them I was thirsty. They gave me water, they gave me food,” Diaz said. “Since I’m here, I don’t have to worry about where to sleep, what to eat.”

The living situation is modest. Many sleep in bunk beds. All share a kitchen. But to those who would otherwise sleep on the streets, Redeemed Outreach is a safe haven.

“We should look at them as being human beings first,” said Autumn Freeman, a Maricopa County probation officer who has clients living at Redeemed Outreach.

Freeman often faces difficulties helping sex offenders on probation find housing because crime-free housing laws limit how many offenders a landlord can rent to at one location. One of Freeman’s clients was registered to a Phoenix bus stop.

TREATMENT

WPTZ Exclusive: Richard Laws speaks about his attempts to get treatment while incarcerated
Richard Laws sits down with WPTZ’s Jarred Hill

UPDATED 9:50 AM EDT Apr 20, 2015 wptz.com

Since the first announcement that a violent sex offender was set to be released after more than two decades in prison, officials have said Richard Laws showed no interest in completing sex offender treatment while in state custody, but court documents and Laws himself, raise the question of whether that’s entirely the case.”

Rehabilitating Sex Offenders

“Uploaded on May 30, 2007

We go behind bars at a federal prison for an exclusive one-on-one interview with a convicted sex offender. The story focuses on a rehabilitation program called SOAR, where a team of psychologists work intensely to help these felons change.”
-21 Week program (Successful.Offenders.Accountability.Rehab.), which 2 of 157 that completed the program “returned”

Sex Offender Accountability and Responsibility (SOAR)
correctionalinnovation.com
/North Carolina /Sex Offender Accountability and Responsibility (SOAR)
“…provides cognitive treatment for sexual offenders. To be enrolled in the program, the offender must be 21, convicted of a sexual felony, admit guilt, have no disabling mental illnesses, and have at least a 6th grade reading level. Additionally, offenders must voluntarily participate in intensive highly interactive therapy sessions, and be infraction free for at least one year. The program lasts 20 weeks with meetings 5 times a week serving approximately 56 offenders. A psychological services coordinator, 2 staff psychologists, a contractual psychologist, and a processing assistant are needed for this program. The Office of Research & Planning has formally evaluated the program. Needed materials and resources include videotapes and office supplies. The program costs $333,942.00 a year…”

Good News Sociology
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